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politicalbetting.com » Blog Archive » On the 2nd anniversary of TMay calling GE2017 fewer are predic

SystemSystem Posts: 6,666
edited April 14 in General

imagepoliticalbetting.com » Blog Archive » On the 2nd anniversary of TMay calling GE2017 fewer are predicting an early election now

https://betdata.io/no-deal-brexit“>Betdata.io chart of movement on the Betfair exchange

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Comments

  • BenpointerBenpointer Posts: 7,939
    First, unlike the Tories at the moment!
  • BenpointerBenpointer Posts: 7,939
    Can't argue with Mike's header. We seem to be facing long-term lingering limbo.
  • TheuniondivvieTheuniondivvie Posts: 13,977
    Green text to honour Celtic's inexorable progress to the treble treble?
  • HYUFDHYUFD Posts: 52,143
    Although if May's Deal does pass in the next few months, the chances of a general election increase with the DUP likely to back a VONC, even with a permanent Customs Union added to the Deal
  • viewcodeviewcode Posts: 7,886
    edited April 14
    @isam

    You've never watched "Yes Minister" or "Star Trek"???

    :( :( :(

  • isamisam Posts: 25,352
    viewcode said:

    @Isam

    You've never watched "Yes Minister" or "Star Trek"???

    :( :( :(

    No.

    And only Star Wars (once) out of that series of films, never watched Superman either. I don’t like sci fi at all really.
  • viewcodeviewcode Posts: 7,886
    isam said:

    viewcode said:

    @Isam

    You've never watched "Yes Minister" or "Star Trek"???

    :( :( :(

    No.

    And only Star Wars (once) out of that series of films, never watched Superman either. I don’t like sci fi at all really.
    Oh, OK
  • The_TaxmanThe_Taxman Posts: 1,167
    Another interesting angle on GE 2019 is that it could be the third time voters had gone to the polls this year. I say this as the local elections followed by likely European elections and finally an autumn GE will have sapped the willpower of even the politically engaged to the end.


    A GE is not in the interests of any mainstream party other than arguably the Labour party and SNP for divergent reasons. TIG are not ready for one, the Lib Dems still stumble along under a clapped out leader and the Tories have abandoned any competence and are a liability to the economy.
  • isamisam Posts: 25,352
    viewcode said:

    isam said:

    viewcode said:

    @Isam

    You've never watched "Yes Minister" or "Star Trek"???

    :( :( :(

    No.

    And only Star Wars (once) out of that series of films, never watched Superman either. I don’t like sci fi at all really.
    Oh, OK
    Cool Hand Luke and Hombre about 200 times each though 😳
  • CarlottaVanceCarlottaVance Posts: 33,283
    Corbyn tells Pelosi (arms unfolded) how it is:

  • rottenboroughrottenborough Posts: 20,668
    edited April 14
    It's Sanders, Harris, Biden, Buttigieg, O'Rouke and then no one on BF.

    Wow.
  • viewcodeviewcode Posts: 7,886
    isam said:

    viewcode said:

    isam said:

    viewcode said:

    @Isam

    You've never watched "Yes Minister" or "Star Trek"???

    :( :( :(

    No.

    And only Star Wars (once) out of that series of films, never watched Superman either. I don’t like sci fi at all really.
    Oh, OK
    Cool Hand Luke and Hombre about 200 times each though 😳
    I won't be challenging you to an egg-eating competition then... :)
  • williamglennwilliamglenn Posts: 26,976

    Corbyn tells Pelosi (arms unfolded) how it is:

    He must have run out of characters to add "...in all its forms".
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 42,246
    I suppose with Brexit pushed back, and thus moment of absolute decision which could break Labour (but will definitely break the Tories) which might precipitate enough chaos for a GE to occur, has also been pushed back.

    Still, it's funny how the polling collapse from the Tories might save them, for a time, by showing them what will happen to them. It's worth noting when May was at least potentially able to pass her deal on time their polling was doing just fine, though it's not a direct correlation.
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 42,246
    eristdoof said:

    kle4 said:

    isam said:

    kle4 said:

    Did he also explain how it quickly changed into such a party and yet it has not dented their chances of winning power at an election at all? Because someone could take a different lesson from that to the one Ian Austin would want them to take.
    Or since the TIGGERS left how they’re leading in all the polls?
    Well in fairness shortly after the Tiggers left the Tories had big leads in the polls all of a sudden, but yes, that Labour are very well placed should worry anyone who thinks Labour are turning into such a party as described, since let's be honest, without facing electoral consequences for bad behaviour no party will think it particularly urgent to deal with, and externals will not shun them either.
    It seems to me that Labour are doing badly in the polls when the current situation in the tory party is taken into consideration.
    That's true, but they only need to do less badly than the Tories to get by.
  • rottenboroughrottenborough Posts: 20,668
    "During an exit interview with President Barack Obama in November, 2016, just weeks after the election, David Remnick asked who would be the leaders of the Democratic Party and the contenders to oppose Trump in 2020. Obama mentioned people like Kamala Harris, of California, and Tim Kaine, of Virginia, along with a very surprising figure: Pete Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Indiana, who was only thirty-five at the time."

    New Yorker magazine.

  • kle4kle4 Posts: 42,246
    edited April 14
    Get Brexit wrapped up, then go, ministers tell May

    What the bloody heck do they think she has been trying to do?! She even promised to go once it was done, and even that did not unlock the votes needed.
  • BarnesianBarnesian Posts: 4,081
    edited April 14
    Could a VONC by Labour succeed in the short term? The Tories have a nominal majority of 3 including the DUP. Would any Tory MPs be motivated to vote against their own party in a VONC (or abstain) before defecting to the Brexit Party?

    If so, then I foresee a VONC in May after the locals, a minority Labour government in July, a second referendum in October, and revoke before 31 October.
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 42,246

    "During an exit interview with President Barack Obama in November, 2016, just weeks after the election, David Remnick asked who would be the leaders of the Democratic Party and the contenders to oppose Trump in 2020. Obama mentioned people like Kamala Harris, of California, and Tim Kaine, of Virginia, along with a very surprising figure: Pete Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Indiana, who was only thirty-five at the time."

    New Yorker magazine.

    I know very little of american politics, but true or not I assume being perceived as an Obama annointed candidate would be quite useful, particularly for someone until now unknown nationally.

    His boldness has to be admired.
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 42,246
    edited April 14
    Scott_P said:
    "We were leading in the polls when the PM was trying to pass her deal. We stopped her. Now we are losing in the polls. It must be her fault!"

    I kid, she is a major problem not that this plotting is frontpage worthy news, but it is amusing how she got zero credit for them being in the lead against Labour, but I bet they think it all her fault now they are behind.
  • williamglennwilliamglenn Posts: 26,976
    kle4 said:

    Get Brexit wrapped up, then go, ministers tell May

    What the bloody heck do they think she has been trying to do?! She even promised to go once it was done, and even that did not unlock the votes needed.
    Now that she's broken past March 29th, whole new avenues have opened up for her to kick the can.
  • rottenboroughrottenborough Posts: 20,668
    kle4 said:

    "During an exit interview with President Barack Obama in November, 2016, just weeks after the election, David Remnick asked who would be the leaders of the Democratic Party and the contenders to oppose Trump in 2020. Obama mentioned people like Kamala Harris, of California, and Tim Kaine, of Virginia, along with a very surprising figure: Pete Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Indiana, who was only thirty-five at the time."

    New Yorker magazine.

    I know very little of american politics, but true or not I assume being perceived as an Obama annointed candidate would be quite useful, particularly for someone until now unknown nationally.

    His boldness has to be admired.
    Yep. Although:

  • rottenboroughrottenborough Posts: 20,668
    Barnesian said:

    Could a VONC by Labour succeed in the short term? The Tories have a nominal majority of 3 including the DUP. Would any Tory MPs be motivated to vote against their own party in a VONC (or abstain) before defecting to the Brexit Party?

    If so, then I foresee a VONC in May after the locals, a minority Labour government in July, a second referendum in October, and revoke before 31 October.

    Jezza must lie awake at nights, thinking of how he might call in a few favours from old times from Sinn Fein.
  • HYUFDHYUFD Posts: 52,143
    Barnesian said:

    Could a VONC by Labour succeed in the short term? The Tories have a nominal majority of 3 including the DUP. Would any Tory MPs be motivated to vote against their own party in a VONC (or abstain) before defecting to the Brexit Party?

    If so, then I foresee a VONC in May after the locals, a minority Labour government in July, a second referendum in October, and revoke before 31 October.

    No, firstly as the Tories are still likely to win the locals and secondly hardline ERGers will only VONC the government if Deal plus Customs Union passes the Commons by which time it would already be law anyway.

    If the Brexit Party wins the Euro elections, as is very possible, I also highly doubt MPs are going to vote for a second referendum or revoke
  • MikeSmithsonMikeSmithson Posts: 5,039

    Barnesian said:

    Could a VONC by Labour succeed in the short term? The Tories have a nominal majority of 3 including the DUP. Would any Tory MPs be motivated to vote against their own party in a VONC (or abstain) before defecting to the Brexit Party?

    If so, then I foresee a VONC in May after the locals, a minority Labour government in July, a second referendum in October, and revoke before 31 October.

    Jezza must lie awake at nights, thinking of how he might call in a few favours from old times from Sinn Fein.
    I don't think that the SNP or the Lib Dems would enthusiastically support a vote of no confidence initiated by Corbyn. He is just electoral poison and they wouldn't want to see to be doing anything that allowed him to become Prime Minister
  • OblitusSumMeOblitusSumMe Posts: 6,749

    kle4 said:

    "During an exit interview with President Barack Obama in November, 2016, just weeks after the election, David Remnick asked who would be the leaders of the Democratic Party and the contenders to oppose Trump in 2020. Obama mentioned people like Kamala Harris, of California, and Tim Kaine, of Virginia, along with a very surprising figure: Pete Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Indiana, who was only thirty-five at the time."

    New Yorker magazine.

    I know very little of american politics, but true or not I assume being perceived as an Obama annointed candidate would be quite useful, particularly for someone until now unknown nationally.

    His boldness has to be admired.
    Yep. Although:

    At first glance it looks like the census has South Bend, Indiana as ~40% Black or Hispanic, so you do wonder why they aren't there.
  • NickPalmerNickPalmer Posts: 12,054
    kle4 said:

    Get Brexit wrapped up, then go, ministers tell May

    What the bloody heck do they think she has been trying to do?! She even promised to go once it was done, and even that did not unlock the votes needed.
    Lol. I think 6 months of nudging the can while Tories debate whether or not to force her out now and then decide maybe not sounds...rather nice. For Labour.
  • BarnesianBarnesian Posts: 4,081
    HYUFD said:

    Barnesian said:

    Could a VONC by Labour succeed in the short term? The Tories have a nominal majority of 3 including the DUP. Would any Tory MPs be motivated to vote against their own party in a VONC (or abstain) before defecting to the Brexit Party?

    If so, then I foresee a VONC in May after the locals, a minority Labour government in July, a second referendum in October, and revoke before 31 October.

    No, firstly as the Tories are still likely to win the locals and secondly hardline ERGers will only VONC the government if Deal plus Customs Union passes the Commons by which time it would already be law anyway.

    If the Brexit Party wins the Euro elections, as is very possible, I also highly doubt MPs are going to vote for a second referendum or revoke
    Labour will win the Euro elections. But if the Brexit party does well, and I think it will, it may well tempt some extreme Tory Brexiteers to defect to it.
  • BarnesianBarnesian Posts: 4,081

    Barnesian said:

    Could a VONC by Labour succeed in the short term? The Tories have a nominal majority of 3 including the DUP. Would any Tory MPs be motivated to vote against their own party in a VONC (or abstain) before defecting to the Brexit Party?

    If so, then I foresee a VONC in May after the locals, a minority Labour government in July, a second referendum in October, and revoke before 31 October.

    Jezza must lie awake at nights, thinking of how he might call in a few favours from old times from Sinn Fein.
    I don't think that the SNP or the Lib Dems would enthusiastically support a vote of no confidence initiated by Corbyn. He is just electoral poison and they wouldn't want to see to be doing anything that allowed him to become Prime Minister
    Disagree. They don't need to enthusiastically support a VONC. They just need to support it. I suspect both the SNP and LibDems would prefer a Corbyn minority government that they control to the current mess. Corbyn's Labour is less electoral poison than the Tories as you can see from the polls.
  • BarnesianBarnesian Posts: 4,081
    Barnesian said:

    HYUFD said:

    Barnesian said:

    Could a VONC by Labour succeed in the short term? The Tories have a nominal majority of 3 including the DUP. Would any Tory MPs be motivated to vote against their own party in a VONC (or abstain) before defecting to the Brexit Party?

    If so, then I foresee a VONC in May after the locals, a minority Labour government in July, a second referendum in October, and revoke before 31 October.

    No, firstly as the Tories are still likely to win the locals and secondly hardline ERGers will only VONC the government if Deal plus Customs Union passes the Commons by which time it would already be law anyway.

    If the Brexit Party wins the Euro elections, as is very possible, I also highly doubt MPs are going to vote for a second referendum or revoke
    Labour will win the Euro elections. But if the Brexit party does well, and I think it will, it may well tempt some extreme Tory Brexiteers to defect to it.
    His sister already has.
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 42,246
    Barnesian said:

    Barnesian said:

    Could a VONC by Labour succeed in the short term? The Tories have a nominal majority of 3 including the DUP. Would any Tory MPs be motivated to vote against their own party in a VONC (or abstain) before defecting to the Brexit Party?

    If so, then I foresee a VONC in May after the locals, a minority Labour government in July, a second referendum in October, and revoke before 31 October.

    Jezza must lie awake at nights, thinking of how he might call in a few favours from old times from Sinn Fein.
    I don't think that the SNP or the Lib Dems would enthusiastically support a vote of no confidence initiated by Corbyn. He is just electoral poison and they wouldn't want to see to be doing anything that allowed him to become Prime Minister
    Disagree. They don't need to enthusiastically support a VONC. They just need to support it. I suspect both the SNP and LibDems would prefer a Corbyn minority government that they control to the current mess. Corbyn's Labour is less electoral poison than the Tories as you can see from the polls.
    Bit of a short term judgement. COrbyn's Labour was somehow well behind the tories only 2 months ago, and they weren't exactly a picture of unity or good governance then either. Not that I expect the Tories to have a massive turnaround, but 'electoral poison' seems to overplay a definite but still pretty rapid trend.
  • williamglennwilliamglenn Posts: 26,976
    Barnesian said:

    Barnesian said:

    HYUFD said:

    Barnesian said:

    Could a VONC by Labour succeed in the short term? The Tories have a nominal majority of 3 including the DUP. Would any Tory MPs be motivated to vote against their own party in a VONC (or abstain) before defecting to the Brexit Party?

    If so, then I foresee a VONC in May after the locals, a minority Labour government in July, a second referendum in October, and revoke before 31 October.

    No, firstly as the Tories are still likely to win the locals and secondly hardline ERGers will only VONC the government if Deal plus Customs Union passes the Commons by which time it would already be law anyway.

    If the Brexit Party wins the Euro elections, as is very possible, I also highly doubt MPs are going to vote for a second referendum or revoke
    Labour will win the Euro elections. But if the Brexit party does well, and I think it will, it may well tempt some extreme Tory Brexiteers to defect to it.
    His sister already has.
    They promised a load of celebrity candidates, so if Rees-Mogg's sister is the best they can do things can't be going that well.
  • brokenwheelbrokenwheel Posts: 1,760
    Barnesian said:

    HYUFD said:

    Barnesian said:

    Could a VONC by Labour succeed in the short term? The Tories have a nominal majority of 3 including the DUP. Would any Tory MPs be motivated to vote against their own party in a VONC (or abstain) before defecting to the Brexit Party?

    If so, then I foresee a VONC in May after the locals, a minority Labour government in July, a second referendum in October, and revoke before 31 October.

    No, firstly as the Tories are still likely to win the locals and secondly hardline ERGers will only VONC the government if Deal plus Customs Union passes the Commons by which time it would already be law anyway.

    If the Brexit Party wins the Euro elections, as is very possible, I also highly doubt MPs are going to vote for a second referendum or revoke
    Labour will win the Euro elections. But if the Brexit party does well, and I think it will, it may well tempt some extreme Tory Brexiteers to defect to it.
    It isn't entirely clear if Farage intends to contest a GE; the strategy behind The Brexit Party is clearly more suited to a European Parliament election. I can only see defectors moving if the Tory Party continues to bleed voteshare and Brexit start to significantly gain in Westminster polling.
  • HYUFDHYUFD Posts: 52,143

    kle4 said:

    "During an exit interview with President Barack Obama in November, 2016, just weeks after the election, David Remnick asked who would be the leaders of the Democratic Party and the contenders to oppose Trump in 2020. Obama mentioned people like Kamala Harris, of California, and Tim Kaine, of Virginia, along with a very surprising figure: Pete Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Indiana, who was only thirty-five at the time."

    New Yorker magazine.

    I know very little of american politics, but true or not I assume being perceived as an Obama annointed candidate would be quite useful, particularly for someone until now unknown nationally.

    His boldness has to be admired.
    Yep. Although:

    Plus the fact O'Rourke is also running splits the young, fresh faced candidate vote, which may actually boost Biden and Sanders (though whichever of them wins could pick one of them as their VP nominee)
  • BarnesianBarnesian Posts: 4,081

    Barnesian said:

    HYUFD said:

    Barnesian said:

    Could a VONC by Labour succeed in the short term? The Tories have a nominal majority of 3 including the DUP. Would any Tory MPs be motivated to vote against their own party in a VONC (or abstain) before defecting to the Brexit Party?

    If so, then I foresee a VONC in May after the locals, a minority Labour government in July, a second referendum in October, and revoke before 31 October.

    No, firstly as the Tories are still likely to win the locals and secondly hardline ERGers will only VONC the government if Deal plus Customs Union passes the Commons by which time it would already be law anyway.

    If the Brexit Party wins the Euro elections, as is very possible, I also highly doubt MPs are going to vote for a second referendum or revoke
    Labour will win the Euro elections. But if the Brexit party does well, and I think it will, it may well tempt some extreme Tory Brexiteers to defect to it.
    It isn't entirely clear if Farage intends to contest a GE; the strategy behind The Brexit Party is clearly more suited to a European Parliament election. I can only see defectors moving if the Tory Party continues to bleed voteshare and Brexit start to significantly gain in Westminster polling.
    Yes - but it only takes two defectors for the Tories to lose a VONC.
  • rottenboroughrottenborough Posts: 20,668

    Barnesian said:

    Barnesian said:

    HYUFD said:

    Barnesian said:

    Could a VONC by Labour succeed in the short term? The Tories have a nominal majority of 3 including the DUP. Would any Tory MPs be motivated to vote against their own party in a VONC (or abstain) before defecting to the Brexit Party?

    If so, then I foresee a VONC in May after the locals, a minority Labour government in July, a second referendum in October, and revoke before 31 October.

    No, firstly as the Tories are still likely to win the locals and secondly hardline ERGers will only VONC the government if Deal plus Customs Union passes the Commons by which time it would already be law anyway.

    If the Brexit Party wins the Euro elections, as is very possible, I also highly doubt MPs are going to vote for a second referendum or revoke
    Labour will win the Euro elections. But if the Brexit party does well, and I think it will, it may well tempt some extreme Tory Brexiteers to defect to it.
    His sister already has.
    They promised a load of celebrity candidates, so if Rees-Mogg's sister is the best they can do things can't be going that well.
    No doubt someone who was once on Emmerdale will be announced after Easter.
  • HYUFDHYUFD Posts: 52,143
    Barnesian said:

    HYUFD said:

    Barnesian said:

    Could a VONC by Labour succeed in the short term? The Tories have a nominal majority of 3 including the DUP. Would any Tory MPs be motivated to vote against their own party in a VONC (or abstain) before defecting to the Brexit Party?

    If so, then I foresee a VONC in May after the locals, a minority Labour government in July, a second referendum in October, and revoke before 31 October.

    No, firstly as the Tories are still likely to win the locals and secondly hardline ERGers will only VONC the government if Deal plus Customs Union passes the Commons by which time it would already be law anyway.

    If the Brexit Party wins the Euro elections, as is very possible, I also highly doubt MPs are going to vote for a second referendum or revoke
    Labour will win the Euro elections. But if the Brexit party does well, and I think it will, it may well tempt some extreme Tory Brexiteers to defect to it.
    I would not be so sure, if Leavers see it as a protest vote over the fact we have not left yet the Brexit Party could well beat both the Tories and Labour.

    I suspect the Brexit Party will only be sustained beyond the Euro elections though if we still have not left the EU by the next general election or Brexit has been revoked, someone like Boris as Tory leader could easily win Brexit Party voters back to the Tories
  • rottenboroughrottenborough Posts: 20,668
    Buttigieg now shorter than Biden for Dem nominee.
  • FoxyFoxy Posts: 7,809
    Barnesian said:

    Barnesian said:

    Could a VONC by Labour succeed in the short term? The Tories have a nominal majority of 3 including the DUP. Would any Tory MPs be motivated to vote against their own party in a VONC (or abstain) before defecting to the Brexit Party?

    If so, then I foresee a VONC in May after the locals, a minority Labour government in July, a second referendum in October, and revoke before 31 October.

    Jezza must lie awake at nights, thinking of how he might call in a few favours from old times from Sinn Fein.
    I don't think that the SNP or the Lib Dems would enthusiastically support a vote of no confidence initiated by Corbyn. He is just electoral poison and they wouldn't want to see to be doing anything that allowed him to become Prime Minister
    Disagree. They don't need to enthusiastically support a VONC. They just need to support it. I suspect both the SNP and LibDems would prefer a Corbyn minority government that they control to the current mess. Corbyn's Labour is less electoral poison than the Tories as you can see from the polls.
    Yes, and no way would or could LD or SNP survive voting to support the government, no matter how much they loathe Corbyn.
  • rottenboroughrottenborough Posts: 20,668
    HYUFD said:

    kle4 said:

    "During an exit interview with President Barack Obama in November, 2016, just weeks after the election, David Remnick asked who would be the leaders of the Democratic Party and the contenders to oppose Trump in 2020. Obama mentioned people like Kamala Harris, of California, and Tim Kaine, of Virginia, along with a very surprising figure: Pete Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Indiana, who was only thirty-five at the time."

    New Yorker magazine.

    I know very little of american politics, but true or not I assume being perceived as an Obama annointed candidate would be quite useful, particularly for someone until now unknown nationally.

    His boldness has to be admired.
    Yep. Although:

    Plus the fact O'Rourke is also running splits the young, fresh faced candidate vote, which may actually boost Biden and Sanders (though whichever of them wins could pick one of them as their VP nominee)
    Biden-Buttigieg has a certain ring to it.
  • OblitusSumMeOblitusSumMe Posts: 6,749
    HYUFD said:

    Barnesian said:

    HYUFD said:

    Barnesian said:

    Could a VONC by Labour succeed in the short term? The Tories have a nominal majority of 3 including the DUP. Would any Tory MPs be motivated to vote against their own party in a VONC (or abstain) before defecting to the Brexit Party?

    If so, then I foresee a VONC in May after the locals, a minority Labour government in July, a second referendum in October, and revoke before 31 October.

    No, firstly as the Tories are still likely to win the locals and secondly hardline ERGers will only VONC the government if Deal plus Customs Union passes the Commons by which time it would already be law anyway.

    If the Brexit Party wins the Euro elections, as is very possible, I also highly doubt MPs are going to vote for a second referendum or revoke
    Labour will win the Euro elections. But if the Brexit party does well, and I think it will, it may well tempt some extreme Tory Brexiteers to defect to it.
    I would not be so sure, if Leavers see it as a protest vote over the fact we have not left yet the Brexit Party could well beat both the Tories and Labour.

    I suspect the Brexit Party will only be sustained beyond the Euro elections though if we still have not left the EU by the next general election or Brexit has been revoked, someone like Boris as Tory leader could easily win Brexit Party voters back to the Tories
    Watch Farage. He abandoned UKIP to their fate after the Brexit referendum. If he decides that his job is done at some point then it is a fair surmise that he anticipates his latest vehicle for self-aggrandisement crashing and burning and doesn't want to be at the helm when it does so.
  • brendan16brendan16 Posts: 1,846
    edited April 15
    Big announcement today from the Government that they are to consult on ending no fault section 21 evictions of private tenants by their landlord. Scotland and Wales are doing the same. This will provide tenants who pay their rent with more security (i.e. they can't just be chucked out on the street with barely 8 weeks notice) and further discourage buy to let - thus hopefully helping first time buyers in a meaningful way (i.e. less competition and cheaper house prices?).

    Clearly the Tories are slowly working out that the party of home ownership won't be a party of government much longer if most people rent!

    Of course the devil will be in the detail - landlords will still be able to evict if they can 'provide a good reason' (e.g. the property is up for sale).

    https://www.theguardian.com/society/2019/apr/15/short-notice-evictions-face-axe-in-tenant-rights-victory?CMP=share_btn_link
  • viewcodeviewcode Posts: 7,886
    Those who believe that "no deal" is an impossibility may wish to listen to this program, in which a Mr Andrew Mackay of Tain in Scotland believes that all that is necessary is for the UK Parliament to amend the deal and the EU will automatically accept it on pain of not receiving the money. I don't know what to say to this gentleman, I really don't. Still, here is the interview so you can make your own mind up: https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/p076dy4v
  • viewcodeviewcode Posts: 7,886
    brendan16 said:

    Big announcement today from the Government that they are to consult on ending no fault section 21 evictions of private tenants by their landlord. Scotland and Wales are doing the same. This will provide tenants who pay their rent with more security (i.e. they can't just be chucked out on the street with barely 8 weeks notice) and further discourage buy to let - thus hopefully helping first time buyers in a meaningful way (i.e. less competition and cheaper house prices?).

    Clearly the Tories are slowly working out that the party of home ownership won't be a party of government much longer if most people rent!

    Of course the devil will be in the detail - landlords will still be able to evict if they can 'provide a good reason' (e.g. the property is up for sale).

    https://www.theguardian.com/society/2019/apr/15/short-notice-evictions-face-axe-in-tenant-rights-victory?CMP=share_btn_link

    Well, that's the rental market f****d. This government just does not know how to do business.
  • edmundintokyoedmundintokyo Posts: 10,815
    viewcode said:

    Those who believe that "no deal" is an impossibility may wish to listen to this program, in which a Mr Andrew Mackay of Tain in Scotland believes that all that is necessary is for the UK Parliament to amend the deal and the EU will automatically accept it on pain of not receiving the money. I don't know what to say to this gentleman, I really don't. Still, here is the interview so you can make your own mind up: https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/p076dy4v

    Is that this guy who has invented an amazing green energy system based on extracting heat from wind but nobody is interested in using it?
    https://twitter.com/andrewhmackay

    It must suck when you've worked out easy ways to solve all the problems but nobody will listen to you.
  • rcs1000rcs1000 Posts: 24,875
    brendan16 said:

    Big announcement today from the Government that they are to consult on ending no fault section 21 evictions of private tenants by their landlord. Scotland and Wales are doing the same. This will provide tenants who pay their rent with more security (i.e. they can't just be chucked out on the street with barely 8 weeks notice) and further discourage buy to let - thus hopefully helping first time buyers in a meaningful way (i.e. less competition and cheaper house prices?).

    Clearly the Tories are slowly working out that the party of home ownership won't be a party of government much longer if most people rent!

    Of course the devil will be in the detail - landlords will still be able to evict if they can 'provide a good reason' (e.g. the property is up for sale).

    https://www.theguardian.com/society/2019/apr/15/short-notice-evictions-face-axe-in-tenant-rights-victory?CMP=share_btn_link

    The problem with laws like this is that when landlords want to get rid of tenants they simply start acting like complete c*nts. So, now they'll be shit at doing repairs, especially in common areas. They'll abuse their right to check things in the apartment. In other words, they'll do everything they legally can to make you go.

    If you look at places with really strong tenant protections, what you see are shitty landlords. The rental sector doesn't stop existing - but bad landlords drive out good.

    It's the classic law of unintended consequences.
  • rcs1000rcs1000 Posts: 24,875

    kle4 said:

    "During an exit interview with President Barack Obama in November, 2016, just weeks after the election, David Remnick asked who would be the leaders of the Democratic Party and the contenders to oppose Trump in 2020. Obama mentioned people like Kamala Harris, of California, and Tim Kaine, of Virginia, along with a very surprising figure: Pete Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Indiana, who was only thirty-five at the time."

    New Yorker magazine.

    I know very little of american politics, but true or not I assume being perceived as an Obama annointed candidate would be quite useful, particularly for someone until now unknown nationally.

    His boldness has to be admired.
    Yep. Although:

    This would be South Bend, Indiana, the home of Notre Dame. (Of which Jed Bartlett was a fictional alum, IIRC.)
  • rcs1000rcs1000 Posts: 24,875
    Yet another European country with four parties in the 15-25% vote range.
  • rcs1000rcs1000 Posts: 24,875

    viewcode said:

    Those who believe that "no deal" is an impossibility may wish to listen to this program, in which a Mr Andrew Mackay of Tain in Scotland believes that all that is necessary is for the UK Parliament to amend the deal and the EU will automatically accept it on pain of not receiving the money. I don't know what to say to this gentleman, I really don't. Still, here is the interview so you can make your own mind up: https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/p076dy4v

    Is that this guy who has invented an amazing green energy system based on extracting heat from wind but nobody is interested in using it?
    https://twitter.com/andrewhmackay

    It must suck when you've worked out easy ways to solve all the problems but nobody will listen to you.
    Entropy's a bitch.
  • Sean_FSean_F Posts: 26,830
    The only thing in common between the modern UK and 1930's Germany is that both are located in Northern Europe.
  • Sean_FSean_F Posts: 26,830
    kle4 said:

    Scott_P said:
    "We were leading in the polls when the PM was trying to pass her deal. We stopped her. Now we are losing in the polls. It must be her fault!"

    I kid, she is a major problem not that this plotting is frontpage worthy news, but it is amusing how she got zero credit for them being in the lead against Labour, but I bet they think it all her fault now they are behind.
    One poster was correct that she needs to produce a picture book about Brexit for some of her MP's.

    "What does Barney the Brexit Dog say?" "Voting against Brexit means that Brexit doesn't happen"

    Mark Francois' single brain cell then starts whirring into life.

    "Oh right. Now I get it."

  • Sean_FSean_F Posts: 26,830
    brendan16 said:

    Big announcement today from the Government that they are to consult on ending no fault section 21 evictions of private tenants by their landlord. Scotland and Wales are doing the same. This will provide tenants who pay their rent with more security (i.e. they can't just be chucked out on the street with barely 8 weeks notice) and further discourage buy to let - thus hopefully helping first time buyers in a meaningful way (i.e. less competition and cheaper house prices?).

    Clearly the Tories are slowly working out that the party of home ownership won't be a party of government much longer if most people rent!

    Of course the devil will be in the detail - landlords will still be able to evict if they can 'provide a good reason' (e.g. the property is up for sale).

    https://www.theguardian.com/society/2019/apr/15/short-notice-evictions-face-axe-in-tenant-rights-victory?CMP=share_btn_link

    People will just stop letting out property, if they cannot get it back at the end of the term.
  • rcs1000rcs1000 Posts: 24,875
    Sean_F said:

    The only thing in common between the modern UK and 1930's Germany is that both are located in Northern Europe.
    That's so not true.

    Both "Germany" and the "United Kingdom" contain "e", "m" and "n".

    Also, in both cases the Head of State is getting on a bit. And their spouses probably shouldn't be driving.

    There have been interesting struggles between the Executive and the Legislature too. Although there's not been any rush to give Mrs May emergency powers yet.
  • eekeek Posts: 3,387
    Sean_F said:

    brendan16 said:

    Big announcement today from the Government that they are to consult on ending no fault section 21 evictions of private tenants by their landlord. Scotland and Wales are doing the same. This will provide tenants who pay their rent with more security (i.e. they can't just be chucked out on the street with barely 8 weeks notice) and further discourage buy to let - thus hopefully helping first time buyers in a meaningful way (i.e. less competition and cheaper house prices?).

    Clearly the Tories are slowly working out that the party of home ownership won't be a party of government much longer if most people rent!

    Of course the devil will be in the detail - landlords will still be able to evict if they can 'provide a good reason' (e.g. the property is up for sale).

    https://www.theguardian.com/society/2019/apr/15/short-notice-evictions-face-axe-in-tenant-rights-victory?CMP=share_btn_link

    People will just stop letting out property, if they cannot get it back at the end of the term.
    Will they? That’s almost identical to the typically btler’s viewpoint that a property disappears into smoke as they sell it (no it’s bought by someone else who will rent it out or by someone who rented who will no longer need to rent somewhere)
  • OldKingColeOldKingCole Posts: 14,485
    brendan16 said:

    Big announcement today from the Government that they are to consult on ending no fault section 21 evictions of private tenants by their landlord. Scotland and Wales are doing the same. This will provide tenants who pay their rent with more security (i.e. they can't just be chucked out on the street with barely 8 weeks notice) and further discourage buy to let - thus hopefully helping first time buyers in a meaningful way (i.e. less competition and cheaper house prices?).

    Clearly the Tories are slowly working out that the party of home ownership won't be a party of government much longer if most people rent!

    Of course the devil will be in the detail - landlords will still be able to evict if they can 'provide a good reason' (e.g. the property is up for sale).

    https://www.theguardian.com/society/2019/apr/15/short-notice-evictions-face-axe-in-tenant-rights-victory?CMP=share_btn_link

    As of this moment it's a consultation document. It does smack of a knee-jerk reaction to a problem, though. Clearly good tenants need protection from bad landlords, but the reverse also applies.

    Why does renting apparently work so well in Germany (for example) but not so well here?
  • rcs1000rcs1000 Posts: 24,875
    eek said:

    Sean_F said:

    brendan16 said:

    Big announcement today from the Government that they are to consult on ending no fault section 21 evictions of private tenants by their landlord. Scotland and Wales are doing the same. This will provide tenants who pay their rent with more security (i.e. they can't just be chucked out on the street with barely 8 weeks notice) and further discourage buy to let - thus hopefully helping first time buyers in a meaningful way (i.e. less competition and cheaper house prices?).

    Clearly the Tories are slowly working out that the party of home ownership won't be a party of government much longer if most people rent!

    Of course the devil will be in the detail - landlords will still be able to evict if they can 'provide a good reason' (e.g. the property is up for sale).

    https://www.theguardian.com/society/2019/apr/15/short-notice-evictions-face-axe-in-tenant-rights-victory?CMP=share_btn_link

    People will just stop letting out property, if they cannot get it back at the end of the term.
    Will they? That’s almost identical to the typically btler’s viewpoint that a property disappears into smoke as they sell it (no it’s bought by someone else who will rent it out or by someone who rented who will no longer need to rent somewhere)
    The problem is not that demand for rented accommodation disappears (there are always going to be good reasons to rent rather than own), simply that legislation like this results in good landlords leaving the industry to be replaced by unscrupulous ones.

    Is there anyone, anywhere in the world, who had a good experience with a rent controlled apartment landlord?

    The answer is... err... no. Because good landlords sell to bad landlords, who attempt to get rid of their tenants via unscrupulous methods. Now, this legislation isn't so severe. But it's heading in that direction. Landlords will now use rent increases to get rid of tenants they don't want. So, there will be legislation enacted to limit landlords flexibility to raise rents.

    The cycle only ends when people (eventually) realise that getting in the way of willing buyer, willing seller only makes things worse.
  • StreeterStreeter Posts: 163
    Sean_F said:

    kle4 said:

    Scott_P said:
    "We were leading in the polls when the PM was trying to pass her deal. We stopped her. Now we are losing in the polls. It must be her fault!"

    I kid, she is a major problem not that this plotting is frontpage worthy news, but it is amusing how she got zero credit for them being in the lead against Labour, but I bet they think it all her fault now they are behind.
    One poster was correct that she needs to produce a picture book about Brexit for some of her MP's.

    "What does Barney the Brexit Dog say?" "Voting against Brexit means that Brexit doesn't happen"

    Mark Francois' single brain cell then starts whirring into life.

    "Oh right. Now I get it."

    Francois doesn’t think May’s Brexit means Brexit.

    Try again.
  • Casino_RoyaleCasino_Royale Posts: 28,073
    rcs1000 said:

    eek said:

    Sean_F said:

    brendan16 said:

    Big announcement today from the Government that they are to consult on ending no fault section 21 evictions of private tenants by their landlord. Scotland and Wales are doing the same. This will provide tenants who pay their rent with more security (i.e. they can't just be chucked out on the street with barely 8 weeks notice) and further discourage buy to let - thus hopefully helping first time buyers in a meaningful way (i.e. less competition and cheaper house prices?).

    Clearly the Tories are slowly working out that the party of home ownership won't be a party of government much longer if most people rent!

    Of course the devil will be in the detail - landlords will still be able to evict if they can 'provide a good reason' (e.g. the property is up for sale).

    https://www.theguardian.com/society/2019/apr/15/short-notice-evictions-face-axe-in-tenant-rights-victory?CMP=share_btn_link

    People will just stop letting out property, if they cannot get it back at the end of the term.
    Will they? That’s almost identical to the typically btler’s viewpoint that a property disappears into smoke as they sell it (no it’s bought by someone else who will rent it out or by someone who rented who will no longer need to rent somewhere)
    The problem is not that demand for rented accommodation disappears (there are always going to be good reasons to rent rather than own), simply that legislation like this results in good landlords leaving the industry to be replaced by unscrupulous ones.

    Is there anyone, anywhere in the world, who had a good experience with a rent controlled apartment landlord?

    The answer is... err... no. Because good landlords sell to bad landlords, who attempt to get rid of their tenants via unscrupulous methods. Now, this legislation isn't so severe. But it's heading in that direction. Landlords will now use rent increases to get rid of tenants they don't want. So, there will be legislation enacted to limit landlords flexibility to raise rents.

    The cycle only ends when people (eventually) realise that getting in the way of willing buyer, willing seller only makes things worse.
    Wet policies like this are part of the Conservatives craven fear of the appeal of Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour to young voters.

    They don’t have the courage to explain why the current system is superior so they just give ground.
  • nielhnielh Posts: 1,285
    rcs1000 said:

    eek said:

    Sean_F said:

    brendan16 said:

    Big announcement today from the Government that they are to consult on ending no fault section 21 evictions of private tenants by their landlord. Scotland and Wales are doing the same. This will provide tenants who pay their rent with more security (i.e. they can't just be chucked out on the street with barely 8 weeks notice) and further discourage buy to let - thus hopefully helping first time buyers in a meaningful way (i.e. less competition and cheaper house prices?).

    Clearly the Tories are slowly working out that the party of home ownership won't be a party of government much longer if most people rent!

    Of course the devil will be in the detail - landlords will still be able to evict if they can 'provide a good reason' (e.g. the property is up for sale).

    https://www.theguardian.com/society/2019/apr/15/short-notice-evictions-face-axe-in-tenant-rights-victory?CMP=share_btn_link

    People will just stop letting out property, if they cannot get it back at the end of the term.
    Will they? That’s almost identical to the typically btler’s viewpoint that a property disappears into smoke as they sell it (no it’s bought by someone else who will rent it out or by someone who rented who will no longer need to rent somewhere)
    The problem is not that demand for rented accommodation disappears (there are always going to be good reasons to rent rather than own), simply that legislation like this results in good landlords leaving the industry to be replaced by unscrupulous ones.

    Is there anyone, anywhere in the world, who had a good experience with a rent controlled apartment landlord?

    The answer is... err... no. Because good landlords sell to bad landlords, who attempt to get rid of their tenants via unscrupulous methods. Now, this legislation isn't so severe. But it's heading in that direction. Landlords will now use rent increases to get rid of tenants they don't want. So, there will be legislation enacted to limit landlords flexibility to raise rents.

    The cycle only ends when people (eventually) realise that getting in the way of willing buyer, willing seller only makes things worse.
    I'm not sure that there is this clear line between good and bad landlords. This is a myth that is perpetrated by organisations like the Landlords Association. I think that both landlords and tenants are largely motivated by self interest.

    One likely consequence is that private sector landlords will withdraw from the market when there is more regulation. As there is less supply, this will put rents up.
  • logical_songlogical_song Posts: 6,794
    Streeter said:

    Sean_F said:

    kle4 said:

    Scott_P said:
    "We were leading in the polls when the PM was trying to pass her deal. We stopped her. Now we are losing in the polls. It must be her fault!"

    I kid, she is a major problem not that this plotting is frontpage worthy news, but it is amusing how she got zero credit for them being in the lead against Labour, but I bet they think it all her fault now they are behind.
    One poster was correct that she needs to produce a picture book about Brexit for some of her MP's.

    "What does Barney the Brexit Dog say?" "Voting against Brexit means that Brexit doesn't happen"

    Mark Francois' single brain cell then starts whirring into life.

    "Oh right. Now I get it."

    Francois doesn’t think May’s Brexit means Brexit.

    Try again.
    Francois doesn’t think.
    May’s Brexit means Brexit.

    Fixed it for you.
  • Morris_DancerMorris_Dancer Posts: 48,591
    Good morning, everyone.

    F1: post-race analysis of China up here:
    http://enormo-haddock.blogspot.com/2019/04/china-post-race-analysis-2019.html

    Ironic that there's all the PR tosh about the thousandth race, yet it was far less interesting than the 999th was or the 1001st is likely to be.
  • Casino_RoyaleCasino_Royale Posts: 28,073
    Sean_F said:

    kle4 said:

    Scott_P said:
    "We were leading in the polls when the PM was trying to pass her deal. We stopped her. Now we are losing in the polls. It must be her fault!"

    I kid, she is a major problem not that this plotting is frontpage worthy news, but it is amusing how she got zero credit for them being in the lead against Labour, but I bet they think it all her fault now they are behind.
    One poster was correct that she needs to produce a picture book about Brexit for some of her MP's.

    "What does Barney the Brexit Dog say?" "Voting against Brexit means that Brexit doesn't happen"

    Mark Francois' single brain cell then starts whirring into life.

    "Oh right. Now I get it."

    Are you sure he’s that well developed?
  • Casino_RoyaleCasino_Royale Posts: 28,073
    nielh said:

    rcs1000 said:

    eek said:

    Sean_F said:

    brendan16 said:

    Big announcement today from the Government that they are to consult on ending no fault section 21 evictions of private tenants by their landlord. Scotland and Wales are doing the same. This will provide tenants who pay their rent with more security (i.e. they can't just be chucked out on the street with barely 8 weeks notice) and further discourage buy to let - thus hopefully helping first time buyers in a meaningful way (i.e. less competition and cheaper house prices?).

    Clearly the Tories are slowly working out that the party of home ownership won't be a party of government much longer if most people rent!

    Of course the devil will be in the detail - landlords will still be able to evict if they can 'provide a good reason' (e.g. the property is up for sale).

    https://www.theguardian.com/society/2019/apr/15/short-notice-evictions-face-axe-in-tenant-rights-victory?CMP=share_btn_link

    People will just stop letting out property, if they cannot get it back at the end of the term.
    Will they? That’s almost identical to the typically btler’s viewpoint that a property disappears into smoke as they sell it (no it’s bought by someone else who will rent it out or by someone who rented who will no longer need to rent somewhere)
    The problem is not that demand for rented accommodation disappears (there are always going to be good reasons to rent rather than own), simply that legislation like this results in good landlords leaving the industry to be replaced by unscrupulous ones.

    Is there anyone, anywhere in the world, who had a good experience with a rent controlled apartment landlord?

    The answer is... err... no. Because good landlords sell to bad landlords, who attempt to get rid of their tenants via unscrupulous methods. Now, this legislation isn't so severe. But it's heading in that direction. Landlords will now use rent increases to get rid of tenants they don't want. So, there will be legislation enacted to limit landlords flexibility to raise rents.

    The cycle only ends when people (eventually) realise that getting in the way of willing buyer, willing seller only makes things worse.
    I'm not sure that there is this clear line between good and bad landlords. This is a myth that is perpetrated by organisations like the Landlords Association. I think that both landlords and tenants are largely motivated by self interest.

    One likely consequence is that private sector landlords will withdraw from the market when there is more regulation. As there is less supply, this will put rents up.
    To withdraw you have to sell.

    Very hard to sell at the moment.
  • OldKingColeOldKingCole Posts: 14,485
    nielh said:

    rcs1000 said:

    eek said:

    Sean_F said:

    brendan16 said:

    Big announcement today from the Government that they are to consult on ending no fault section 21 evictions of private tenants by their landlord. Scotland and Wales are doing the same. This will provide tenants who pay their rent with more security (i.e. they can't just be chucked out on the street with barely 8 weeks notice) and further discourage buy to let - thus hopefully helping first time buyers in a meaningful way (i.e. less competition and cheaper house prices?).

    Clearly the Tories are slowly working out that the party of home ownership won't be a party of government much longer if most people rent!

    Of course the devil will be in the detail - landlords will still be able to evict if they can 'provide a good reason' (e.g. the property is up for sale).

    https://www.theguardian.com/society/2019/apr/15/short-notice-evictions-face-axe-in-tenant-rights-victory?CMP=share_btn_link

    People will just stop letting out property, if they cannot get it back at the end of the term.
    Will they? That’s almost identical to the typically btler’s viewpoint that a property disappears into smoke as they sell it (no it’s bought by someone else who will rent it out or by someone who rented who will no longer need to rent somewhere)
    The problem is not that demand for rented accommodation disappears (there are always going to be good reasons to rent rather than own), simply that legislation like this results in good landlords leaving the industry to be replaced by unscrupulous ones.

    Is there anyone, anywhere in the world, who had a good experience with a rent controlled apartment landlord?

    The answer is... err... no. Because good landlords sell to bad landlords, who attempt to get rid of their tenants via unscrupulous methods. Now, this legislation isn't so severe. But it's heading in that direction. Landlords will now use rent increases to get rid of tenants they don't want. So, there will be legislation enacted to limit landlords flexibility to raise rents.

    The cycle only ends when people (eventually) realise that getting in the way of willing buyer, willing seller only makes things worse.
    I'm not sure that there is this clear line between good and bad landlords. This is a myth that is perpetrated by organisations like the Landlords Association. I think that both landlords and tenants are largely motivated by self interest.

    One likely consequence is that private sector landlords will withdraw from the market when there is more regulation. As there is less supply, this will put rents up.
    So we'll have a housing situation where both prices and rents are high.

    For some reason, that doesn't seem like a very good thing.
  • rcs1000rcs1000 Posts: 24,875
    nielh said:

    rcs1000 said:

    eek said:

    Sean_F said:

    brendan16 said:

    Big announcement today from the Government that they are to consult on ending no fault section 21 evictions of private tenants by their landlord. Scotland and Wales are doing the same. This will provide tenants who pay their rent with more security (i.e. they can't just be chucked out on the street with barely 8 weeks notice) and further discourage buy to let - thus hopefully helping first time buyers in a meaningful way (i.e. less competition and cheaper house prices?).

    Clearly the Tories are slowly working out that the party of home ownership won't be a party of government much longer if most people rent!

    Of course the devil will be in the detail - landlords will still be able to evict if they can 'provide a good reason' (e.g. the property is up for sale).

    https://www.theguardian.com/society/2019/apr/15/short-notice-evictions-face-axe-in-tenant-rights-victory?CMP=share_btn_link

    People will just stop letting out property, if they cannot get it back at the end of the term.
    Will they? That’s almost identical to the typically btler’s viewpoint that a property disappears into smoke as they sell it (no it’s bought by someone else who will rent it out or by someone who rented who will no longer need to rent somewhere)
    The problem is not that demand for rented accommodation disappears (there are always going to be good reasons to rent rather than own), simply that legislation like this results in good landlords leaving the industry to be replaced by unscrupulous ones.

    Is there anyone, anywhere in the world, who had a good experience with a rent controlled apartment landlord?

    The answer is... err... no. Because good landlords sell to bad landlords, who attempt to get rid of their tenants via unscrupulous methods. Now, this legislation isn't so severe. But it's heading in that direction. Landlords will now use rent increases to get rid of tenants they don't want. So, there will be legislation enacted to limit landlords flexibility to raise rents.

    The cycle only ends when people (eventually) realise that getting in the way of willing buyer, willing seller only makes things worse.
    I'm not sure that there is this clear line between good and bad landlords. This is a myth that is perpetrated by organisations like the Landlords Association. I think that both landlords and tenants are largely motivated by self interest.

    One likely consequence is that private sector landlords will withdraw from the market when there is more regulation. As there is less supply, this will put rents up.
    Of course there's no clear line, and it's a continuum. But I've had shitty, evil landlords in time as a renter, and conscientious, honest ones, and everything in between.
  • IanB2IanB2 Posts: 16,802

    kle4 said:

    Get Brexit wrapped up, then go, ministers tell May

    What the bloody heck do they think she has been trying to do?! She even promised to go once it was done, and even that did not unlock the votes needed.
    Lol. I think 6 months of nudging the can while Tories debate whether or not to force her out now and then decide maybe not sounds...rather nice. For Labour.
    Although I think Labour is losing its fear that a popular replacement might be able to snatch a majority; the Tories are starting to look like losers under any leader.
  • logical_songlogical_song Posts: 6,794

    viewcode said:

    Those who believe that "no deal" is an impossibility may wish to listen to this program, in which a Mr Andrew Mackay of Tain in Scotland believes that all that is necessary is for the UK Parliament to amend the deal and the EU will automatically accept it on pain of not receiving the money. I don't know what to say to this gentleman, I really don't. Still, here is the interview so you can make your own mind up: https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/p076dy4v

    Is that this guy who has invented an amazing green energy system based on extracting heat from wind but nobody is interested in using it?
    https://twitter.com/andrewhmackay

    It must suck when you've worked out easy ways to solve all the problems but nobody will listen to you.
    A dormant company according to Companies House.
  • nielhnielh Posts: 1,285

    brendan16 said:

    Big announcement today from the Government that they are to consult on ending no fault section 21 evictions of private tenants by their landlord. Scotland and Wales are doing the same. This will provide tenants who pay their rent with more security (i.e. they can't just be chucked out on the street with barely 8 weeks notice) and further discourage buy to let - thus hopefully helping first time buyers in a meaningful way (i.e. less competition and cheaper house prices?).

    Clearly the Tories are slowly working out that the party of home ownership won't be a party of government much longer if most people rent!

    Of course the devil will be in the detail - landlords will still be able to evict if they can 'provide a good reason' (e.g. the property is up for sale).

    https://www.theguardian.com/society/2019/apr/15/short-notice-evictions-face-axe-in-tenant-rights-victory?CMP=share_btn_link

    As of this moment it's a consultation document. It does smack of a knee-jerk reaction to a problem, though. Clearly good tenants need protection from bad landlords, but the reverse also applies.

    Why does renting apparently work so well in Germany (for example) but not so well here?
    The problem is rooted in the overall supply of housing. IE: far from enough housing being built for many years, lots of low quality substandard housing.

    However, it clearly doesn't make sense that people can be evicted at 1 or even 2 months notice. Most European countries I know have 6 months or a year on long term contracts. If you have kids and they are attending local schools etc, their lives can be usurped at 2 months notice.

  • IanB2IanB2 Posts: 16,802

    HYUFD said:

    Barnesian said:

    HYUFD said:

    Barnesian said:

    Could a VONC by Labour succeed in the short term? The Tories have a nominal majority of 3 including the DUP. Would any Tory MPs be motivated to vote against their own party in a VONC (or abstain) before defecting to the Brexit Party?

    If so, then I foresee a VONC in May after the locals, a minority Labour government in July, a second referendum in October, and revoke before 31 October.

    No, firstly as the Tories are still likely to win the locals and secondly hardline ERGers will only VONC the government if Deal plus Customs Union passes the Commons by which time it would already be law anyway.

    If the Brexit Party wins the Euro elections, as is very possible, I also highly doubt MPs are going to vote for a second referendum or revoke
    Labour will win the Euro elections. But if the Brexit party does well, and I think it will, it may well tempt some extreme Tory Brexiteers to defect to it.
    I would not be so sure, if Leavers see it as a protest vote over the fact we have not left yet the Brexit Party could well beat both the Tories and Labour.

    I suspect the Brexit Party will only be sustained beyond the Euro elections though if we still have not left the EU by the next general election or Brexit has been revoked, someone like Boris as Tory leader could easily win Brexit Party voters back to the Tories
    Watch Farage. He abandoned UKIP to their fate after the Brexit referendum. If he decides that his job is done at some point then it is a fair surmise that he anticipates his latest vehicle for self-aggrandisement crashing and burning and doesn't want to be at the helm when it does so.
    Farage's recent speeches are mapping out a bigger objective than securing Brexit, talking of breaking the two party system for good. Of course this is Farage, so who knows how long his interest will sustain. But it does indicate a current intention to carry through to the next GE.

    Meanwhile despite all the talk of his new outfit topping the poll, it has yet to establish itself as the principal challenger and is still below ukip in most polls. I doubt they have much of a ground campaign given no organisation and a support base that tends toward the elderly. Not everyone watches politics programmes avidly on television. So they have just over a month to achieve rather a lot.
  • nielhnielh Posts: 1,285

    nielh said:

    rcs1000 said:

    eek said:

    Sean_F said:

    brendan16 said:

    Big announcement today from the Government that they are to consult on ending no fault section 21 evictions of private tenants by their landlord. Scotland and Wales are doing the same. This will provide tenants who pay their rent with more security (i.e. they can't just be chucked out on the street with barely 8 weeks notice) and further discourage buy to let - thus hopefully helping first time buyers in a meaningful way (i.e. less competition and cheaper house prices?).

    Clearly the Tories are slowly working out that the party of home ownership won't be a party of government much longer if most people rent!

    Of course the devil will be in the detail - landlords will still be able to evict if they can 'provide a good reason' (e.g. the property is up for sale).

    https://www.theguardian.com/society/2019/apr/15/short-notice-evictions-face-axe-in-tenant-rights-victory?CMP=share_btn_link

    People will just stop letting out property, if they cannot get it back at the end of the term.
    The problem is not that demand for rented accommodation disappears (there are always going to be good reasons to rent rather than own), simply that legislation like this results in good landlords leaving the industry to be replaced by unscrupulous ones.

    Is there anyone, anywhere in the world, who had a good experience with a rent controlled apartment landlord?

    The answer is... err... no. Because good landlords sell to bad landlords, who attempt to get rid of their tenants via unscrupulous methods. Now, this legislation isn't so severe. But it's heading in that direction. Landlords will now use rent increases to get rid of tenants they don't want. So, there will be legislation enacted to limit landlords flexibility to raise rents.

    The cycle only ends when people (eventually) realise that getting in the way of willing buyer, willing seller only makes things worse.
    I'm not sure that there is this clear line between good and bad landlords. This is a myth that is perpetrated by organisations like the Landlords Association. I think that both landlords and tenants are largely motivated by self interest.

    One likely consequence is that private sector landlords will withdraw from the market when there is more regulation. As there is less supply, this will put rents up.
    To withdraw you have to sell.

    Very hard to sell at the moment.
    If renting out the place becomes too risky and a money pit due to regulation, then you have no alternative option, and there is always a price you can sell at.
  • If landlords sell it is either to other landlords or renters. If it is to landlords there are the same number of houses to rent, no change. If a renter becomes an owner, it will tend to be a renter who is richer than the average renter. With one less house in the market and one less tenant, and the average renter slighty poorer, rents go down not up.
  • OldKingColeOldKingCole Posts: 14,485
    nielh said:

    brendan16 said:

    Big announcement today from the Government that they are to consult on ending no fault section 21 evictions of private tenants by their landlord. Scotland and Wales are doing the same. This will provide tenants who pay their rent with more security (i.e. they can't just be chucked out on the street with barely 8 weeks notice) and further discourage buy to let - thus hopefully helping first time buyers in a meaningful way (i.e. less competition and cheaper house prices?).

    Clearly the Tories are slowly working out that the party of home ownership won't be a party of government much longer if most people rent!

    Of course the devil will be in the detail - landlords will still be able to evict if they can 'provide a good reason' (e.g. the property is up for sale).

    https://www.theguardian.com/society/2019/apr/15/short-notice-evictions-face-axe-in-tenant-rights-victory?CMP=share_btn_link

    As of this moment it's a consultation document. It does smack of a knee-jerk reaction to a problem, though. Clearly good tenants need protection from bad landlords, but the reverse also applies.

    Why does renting apparently work so well in Germany (for example) but not so well here?
    The problem is rooted in the overall supply of housing. IE: far from enough housing being built for many years, lots of low quality substandard housing.

    However, it clearly doesn't make sense that people can be evicted at 1 or even 2 months notice. Most European countries I know have 6 months or a year on long term contracts. If you have kids and they are attending local schools etc, their lives can be usurped at 2 months notice.

    Quite. One wouldn't think there was a housing shortage here in Mid & N Essex. Around Colchester and Chelmsford there are substantial developments.
  • rcs1000 said:

    eek said:

    Sean_F said:

    brendan16 said:

    Big announcement today from the Government that they are to consult on ending no fault section 21 evictions of private tenants by their landlord. Scotland and Wales are doing the same. This will provide tenants who pay their rent with more security (i.e. they can't just be chucked out on the street with barely 8 weeks notice) and further discourage buy to let - thus hopefully helping first time buyers in a meaningful way (i.e. less competition and cheaper house prices?).

    Clearly the Tories are slowly working out that the party of home ownership won't be a party of government much longer if most people rent!

    Of course the devil will be in the detail - landlords will still be able to evict if they can 'provide a good reason' (e.g. the property is up for sale).

    https://www.theguardian.com/society/2019/apr/15/short-notice-evictions-face-axe-in-tenant-rights-victory?CMP=share_btn_link

    People will just stop letting out property, if they cannot get it back at the end of the term.
    Will they? That’s almost identical to the typically btler’s viewpoint that a property disappears into smoke as they sell it (no it’s bought by someone else who will rent it out or by someone who rented who will no longer need to rent somewhere)
    The problem is not that demand for rented accommodation disappears (there are always going to be good reasons to rent rather than own), simply that legislation like this results in good landlords leaving the industry to be replaced by unscrupulous ones.

    Is there anyone, anywhere in the world, who had a good experience with a rent controlled apartment landlord?

    The answer is... err... no. Because good landlords sell to bad landlords, who attempt to get rid of their tenants via unscrupulous methods. Now, this legislation isn't so severe. But it's heading in that direction. Landlords will now use rent increases to get rid of tenants they don't want. So, there will be legislation enacted to limit landlords flexibility to raise rents.

    The cycle only ends when people (eventually) realise that getting in the way of willing buyer, willing seller only makes things worse.
    Wet policies like this are part of the Conservatives craven fear of the appeal of Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour to young voters.

    They don’t have the courage to explain why the current system is superior so they just give ground.
    The current system is superior for the older Conservative voting landlords yes but not the younger tenants who have no security!
  • IanB2IanB2 Posts: 16,802
    edited April 15
    Having rented for a short period a few years back, I think the government proposals are very welcome. That's assuming they actually get round to doing anything afterwards, and this isn't another consultation that goes nowhere. If you've been a good tenant and looked after a property it is shocking to get a letter out of the blue giving you just a few weeks to move house, and as others have said it doesnt work this way in most of Europe.
  • RogerRoger Posts: 10,822
    edited April 15
    l
    Sean_F said:

    kle4 said:

    Scott_P said:
    "We were leading in the polls when the PM was trying to pass her deal. We stopped her. Now we are losing in the polls. It must be her fault!"

    I kid, she is a major problem not that this plotting is frontpage worthy news, but it is amusing how she got zero credit for them being in the lead against Labour, but I bet they think it all her fault now they are behind.
    One poster was correct that she needs to produce a picture book about Brexit for some of her MP's.

    "What does Barney the Brexit Dog say?" "Voting against Brexit means that Brexit doesn't happen"

    Mark Francois' single brain cell then starts whirring into life.

    "Oh right. Now I get it."

    There was once a family called Brexit. Mummy Brexit Daddy Brexit and Billy Brexit and they all lived in a little house in tiny village. One day some new neigbours moved in speaking a language that the Brexits couldn't understand.

    Mummy Brexit didn't like this so she got Daddy Brexit to drive a little white van around the village with a big sign saying 'Go away neigbours you aren't wanted here'.

    Daddy Brexit had left school when he was very young so he wasn't very clever and everybody called him 'thicko'. He loved driving this van because it was so very very white......

    One day Billy was walking to school
  • The housing "shortage" is not solely about the number of houses, the bigger impact on society is the cost of housing. This has been driven up by large numbers of private landlords over the last 30 years speculating on cheap and loose credit, subsidised by the government.

    The government is rightly trying to re-balance this through changing tax reliefs, banning tenants fees and now removing/limiting no fault evictions.
  • JosiasJessopJosiasJessop Posts: 23,180
    Roger said:

    l

    Sean_F said:

    kle4 said:

    Scott_P said:
    "We were leading in the polls when the PM was trying to pass her deal. We stopped her. Now we are losing in the polls. It must be her fault!"

    I kid, she is a major problem not that this plotting is frontpage worthy news, but it is amusing how she got zero credit for them being in the lead against Labour, but I bet they think it all her fault now they are behind.
    One poster was correct that she needs to produce a picture book about Brexit for some of her MP's.

    "What does Barney the Brexit Dog say?" "Voting against Brexit means that Brexit doesn't happen"

    Mark Francois' single brain cell then starts whirring into life.

    "Oh right. Now I get it."

    There was once a family called Brexit. Mummy Brexit Daddy Brexit and Billy Brexit and they all lived in a little house in tiny village. One day some new neigbours moved in speaking a language that the Brexits couldn't understand.

    Mummy Brexit didn't like this so she got Daddy Brexit to drive a little white van around the village with a big sign saying 'Go away neigbours you aren't wanted here'.

    Daddy Brexit had left school when he was very young so he wasn't very clever and everybody called him 'thicko'. He loved driving this van because it was so very very white......

    One day Billy was walking to school
    And the final family member was Roger Brexit, who could not complete a story or use a quote system. ;)
  • tlg86tlg86 Posts: 10,370

    The housing "shortage" is not solely about the number of houses, the bigger impact on society is the cost of housing. This has been driven up by large numbers of private landlords over the last 30 years speculating on cheap and loose credit, subsidised by the government.

    The government is rightly trying to re-balance this through changing tax reliefs, banning tenants fees and now removing/limiting no fault evictions.

    Far simpler to raise interest rates.
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 17,394

    Roger said:

    l

    Sean_F said:

    kle4 said:

    Scott_P said:
    "We were leading in the polls when the PM was trying to pass her deal. We stopped her. Now we are losing in the polls. It must be her fault!"

    I kid, she is a major problem not that this plotting is frontpage worthy news, but it is amusing how she got zero credit for them being in the lead against Labour, but I bet they think it all her fault now they are behind.
    One poster was correct that she needs to produce a picture book about Brexit for some of her MP's.

    "What does Barney the Brexit Dog say?" "Voting against Brexit means that Brexit doesn't happen"

    Mark Francois' single brain cell then starts whirring into life.

    "Oh right. Now I get it."

    There was once a family called Brexit. Mummy Brexit Daddy Brexit and Billy Brexit and they all lived in a little house in tiny village. One day some new neigbours moved in speaking a language that the Brexits couldn't understand.

    Mummy Brexit didn't like this so she got Daddy Brexit to drive a little white van around the village with a big sign saying 'Go away neigbours you aren't wanted here'.

    Daddy Brexit had left school when he was very young so he wasn't very clever and everybody called him 'thicko'. He loved driving this van because it was so very very white......

    One day Billy was walking to school
    And the final family member was Roger Brexit, who could not complete a story or use a quote system. ;)
    The ERG are the ones who have comprehensively rogered Brexit.
  • RogerRoger Posts: 10,822

    Roger said:

    l

    Sean_F said:

    kle4 said:

    Scott_P said:
    "We were leading in the polls when the PM was trying to pass her deal. We stopped her. Now we are losing in the polls. It must be her fault!"

    I kid, she is a major problem not that this plotting is frontpage worthy news, but it is amusing how she got zero credit for them being in the lead against Labour, but I bet they think it all her fault now they are behind.
    One poster was correct that she needs to produce a picture book about Brexit for some of her MP's.

    "What does Barney the Brexit Dog say?" "Voting against Brexit means that Brexit doesn't happen"

    Mark Francois' single brain cell then starts whirring into life.

    "Oh right. Now I get it."

    There was once a family called Brexit. Mummy Brexit Daddy Brexit and Billy Brexit and they all lived in a little house in tiny village. One day some new neigbours moved in speaking a language that the Brexits couldn't understand.

    Mummy Brexit didn't like this so she got Daddy Brexit to drive a little white van around the village with a big sign saying 'Go away neigbours you aren't wanted here'.

    Daddy Brexit had left school when he was very young so he wasn't very clever and everybody called him 'thicko'. He loved driving this van because it was so very very white......

    One day Billy was walking to school
    And the final family member was Roger Brexit, who could not complete a story or use a quote system. ;)
    Just a synopsis and a couple of paragraphs! What do you expect-Harry Potter?
  • OldKingColeOldKingCole Posts: 14,485

    The housing "shortage" is not solely about the number of houses, the bigger impact on society is the cost of housing. This has been driven up by large numbers of private landlords over the last 30 years speculating on cheap and loose credit, subsidised by the government.

    The government is rightly trying to re-balance this through changing tax reliefs, banning tenants fees and now removing/limiting no fault evictions.

    But it's doing it piecemeal. That's the problem. Someone, somewhere, should be sitting down and doing a thorough review, not 'fixing' the immediate problem. Unquestionably there's a place for a rented sector; for example, my granddaughter and her (new, so no question of moving in together) boyfriend both live in rented accommodation because they don't know yet where they are going to settle down.
  • JosiasJessopJosiasJessop Posts: 23,180
    Roger said:

    Roger said:

    l

    Sean_F said:

    kle4 said:

    Scott_P said:
    "We were leading in the polls when the PM was trying to pass her deal. We stopped her. Now we are losing in the polls. It must be her fault!"

    I kid, she is a major problem not that this plotting is frontpage worthy news, but it is amusing how she got zero credit for them being in the lead against Labour, but I bet they think it all her fault now they are behind.
    One poster was correct that she needs to produce a picture book about Brexit for some of her MP's.

    "What does Barney the Brexit Dog say?" "Voting against Brexit means that Brexit doesn't happen"

    Mark Francois' single brain cell then starts whirring into life.

    "Oh right. Now I get it."

    There was once a family called Brexit. Mummy Brexit Daddy Brexit and Billy Brexit and they all lived in a little house in tiny village. One day some new neigbours moved in speaking a language that the Brexits couldn't understand.

    Mummy Brexit didn't like this so she got Daddy Brexit to drive a little white van around the village with a big sign saying 'Go away neigbours you aren't wanted here'.

    Daddy Brexit had left school when he was very young so he wasn't very clever and everybody called him 'thicko'. He loved driving this van because it was so very very white......

    One day Billy was walking to school
    And the final family member was Roger Brexit, who could not complete a story or use a quote system. ;)
    Just a synopsis and a couple of paragraphs! What do you expect-Harry Potter?
    I wondered if you'd left it at a thirty-second ad length, like the old Bisto ad serials. Tune in next month to see how Daddy Brexit is caught in bed with Madam Europhile, whilst Mummy Brexit is caught shoplifting product A because it's so darned good.
  • tlg86 said:

    The housing "shortage" is not solely about the number of houses, the bigger impact on society is the cost of housing. This has been driven up by large numbers of private landlords over the last 30 years speculating on cheap and loose credit, subsidised by the government.

    The government is rightly trying to re-balance this through changing tax reliefs, banning tenants fees and now removing/limiting no fault evictions.

    Far simpler to raise interest rates.
    Raising rates would obviously help with the price of housing, but would have wider impacts too. It "feels" to me like rates have been too low this decade but given the number of central bankers who agree they should stay very low, there is a fair chance I am missing something.

    The changes on tenants fees and the proposal for removing no fault evictions are clearly a step in the right direction.
  • Casino_RoyaleCasino_Royale Posts: 28,073
    nielh said:

    nielh said:

    rcs1000 said:

    eek said:

    Sean_F said:

    brendan16 said:

    Big announcement today from the Government that they are to consult on ending no fault section 21 evictions of private tenants by their landlord. Scotland and Wales are doing the same. This will provide tenants who pay their rent with more security (i.e. they can't just be chucked out on the street with barely 8 weeks notice) and further discourage buy to let - thus hopefully helping first time buyers in a meaningful way (i.e. less competition and cheaper house prices?).

    Clearly the Tories are slowly working out that the party of home ownership won't be a party of government much longer if most people rent!

    Of course the devil will be in the detail - landlords will still be able to evict if they can 'provide a good reason' (e.g. the property is up for sale).

    https://www.theguardian.com/society/2019/apr/15/short-notice-evictions-face-axe-in-tenant-rights-victory?CMP=share_btn_link

    People will just stop letting out property, if they cannot get it back at the end of the term.
    The problem is not that demand for rented accommodation disappears (there are always going to be good reasons to rent rather than own), simply that legislation like this results in good landlords leaving the industry to be replaced by unscrupulous ones.

    Is there anyone, anywhere in the world, who had a good experience with a rent controlled apartment landlord?

    The answer is... err... no. Because good landlords sell to bad landlords, who attempt to get rid of their tenants via unscrupulous methods. Now, this legislation isn't so severe. But it's heading in that direction. Landlords will now use rent increases to get rid of tenants they don't want. So, there will be legislation enacted to limit landlords flexibility to raise rents.

    The cycle only ends when people (eventually) realise that getting in the way of willing buyer, willing seller only makes things worse.
    I'm not sure that there is this clear line between good and bad landlords. This is a myth that is perpetrated by organisations like the Landlords Association. I think that both landlords and tenants are largely motivated by self interest.

    One likely consequence is that private sector landlords will withdraw from the market when there is more regulation. As there is less supply, this will put rents up.
    To withdraw you have to sell.

    Very hard to sell at the moment.
    If renting out the place becomes too risky and a money pit due to regulation, then you have no alternative option, and there is always a price you can sell at.
    You have to take a big haircut to sell quickly and in a hurry.
  • RogerRoger Posts: 10,822

    Roger said:

    Roger said:

    l

    Sean_F said:

    kle4 said:

    Scott_P said:
    "We were leading in the polls when the PM was trying to pass her deal. We stopped her. Now we are losing in the polls. It must be her fault!"

    I kid, she is a major problem not that this plotting is frontpage worthy news, but it is amusing how she got zero credit for them being in the lead against Labour, but I bet they think it all her fault now they are behind.
    One poster was correct that she needs to produce a picture book about Brexit for some of her MP's.

    "What does Barney the Brexit Dog say?" "Voting against Brexit means that Brexit doesn't happen"

    Mark Francois' single brain cell then starts whirring into life.

    "Oh right. Now I get it."

    There was once a family called Brexit. Mummy Brexit Daddy Brexit and Billy Brexit and they all lived in a little house in tiny village. One day some new neigbours moved in speaking a language that the Brexits couldn't understand.

    Mummy Brexit didn't like this so she got Daddy Brexit to drive a little white van around the village with a big sign saying 'Go away neigbours you aren't wanted here'.

    Daddy Brexit had left school when he was very young so he wasn't very clever and everybody called him 'thicko'. He loved driving this van because it was so very very white......

    One day Billy was walking to school
    And the final family member was Roger Brexit, who could not complete a story or use a quote system. ;)
    Just a synopsis and a couple of paragraphs! What do you expect-Harry Potter?
    I wondered if you'd left it at a thirty-second ad length, like the old Bisto ad serials. Tune in next month to see how Daddy Brexit is caught in bed with Madam Europhile, whilst Mummy Brexit is caught shoplifting product A because it's so darned good.
    Not a bad idea. At least the next generation could learn from a very early age why their parents were reduced to penury
  • Casino_RoyaleCasino_Royale Posts: 28,073

    rcs1000 said:

    eek said:

    Sean_F said:

    brendan16 said:

    Big announcement today from the Government that they are to consult on ending no fault section 21 evictions of private tenants by their landlord. Scotland and Wales are doing the same. This will provide tenants who pay their rent with more security (i.e. they can't just be chucked out on the street with barely 8 weeks notice) and further discourage buy to let - thus hopefully helping first time buyers in a meaningful way (i.e. less competition and cheaper house prices?).

    Clearly the Tories are slowly working out that the party of home ownership won't be a party of government much longer if most people rent!

    Of course the devil will be in the detail - landlords will still be able to evict if they can 'provide a good reason' (e.g. the property is up for sale).

    https://www.theguardian.com/society/2019/apr/15/short-notice-evictions-face-axe-in-tenant-rights-victory?CMP=share_btn_link

    People will just stop letting out property, if they cannot get it back at the end of the term.
    Will they? That’s almost identical to the typically btler’s viewpoint that a property disappears into smoke as they sell it (no it’s bought by someone else who will rent it out or by someone who rented who will no longer need to rent somewhere)
    The problem is not that demand for rented accommodation disappears (there are always going to be good reasons to rent rather than own), simply that legislation like this results in good landlords leaving the industry to be replaced by unscrupulous ones.

    Is there anyone, anywhere in the world, who had a good experience with a rent controlled apartment landlord?

    The answer is... err... no. Because good landlords sell to bad landlords, who attempt to get rid of their tenants via unscrupulous methods. Now, this legislation isn't so severe. But it's heading in that direction. Landlords will now use rent increases to get rid of tenants they don't want. So, there will be legislation enacted to limit landlords flexibility to raise rents.

    The cycle only ends when people (eventually) realise that getting in the way of willing buyer, willing seller only makes things worse.
    Wet policies like this are part of the Conservatives craven fear of the appeal of Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour to young voters.

    They don’t have the courage to explain why the current system is superior so they just give ground.
    The current system is superior for the older Conservative voting landlords yes but not the younger tenants who have no security!
    It’s a problem fairly localised to London, and a couple of other urban cities.

    The root cause is under supply of rental properties and overpriced properties for sale.
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 17,394
    Roger said:

    Roger said:

    l

    Sean_F said:

    kle4 said:

    Scott_P said:
    "We were leading in the polls when the PM was trying to pass her deal. We stopped her. Now we are losing in the polls. It must be her fault!"

    I kid, she is a major problem not that this plotting is frontpage worthy news, but it is amusing how she got zero credit for them being in the lead against Labour, but I bet they think it all her fault now they are behind.
    One poster was correct that she needs to produce a picture book about Brexit for some of her MP's.

    "What does Barney the Brexit Dog say?" "Voting against Brexit means that Brexit doesn't happen"

    Mark Francois' single brain cell then starts whirring into life.

    "Oh right. Now I get it."

    There was once a family called Brexit. Mummy Brexit Daddy Brexit and Billy Brexit and they all lived in a little house in tiny village. One day some new neigbours moved in speaking a language that the Brexits couldn't understand.

    Mummy Brexit didn't like this so she got Daddy Brexit to drive a little white van around the village with a big sign saying 'Go away neigbours you aren't wanted here'.

    Daddy Brexit had left school when he was very young so he wasn't very clever and everybody called him 'thicko'. He loved driving this van because it was so very very white......

    One day Billy was walking to school
    And the final family member was Roger Brexit, who could not complete a story or use a quote system. ;)
    Just a synopsis and a couple of paragraphs! What do you expect-Harry Potter?
    Witch storyline were you planning to develop further?
  • noneoftheabovenoneoftheabove Posts: 86
    edited April 15

    The housing "shortage" is not solely about the number of houses, the bigger impact on society is the cost of housing. This has been driven up by large numbers of private landlords over the last 30 years speculating on cheap and loose credit, subsidised by the government.

    The government is rightly trying to re-balance this through changing tax reliefs, banning tenants fees and now removing/limiting no fault evictions.

    But it's doing it piecemeal. That's the problem. Someone, somewhere, should be sitting down and doing a thorough review, not 'fixing' the immediate problem. Unquestionably there's a place for a rented sector; for example, my granddaughter and her (new, so no question of moving in together) boyfriend both live in rented accommodation because they don't know yet where they are going to settle down.
    They are doing it piecemeal as every change gets attacked as if we are moving to ban private ownership (generally with fake sympathy for renters that rents will go up and conditions will go down). If they tried to do all of it together it would not have got through parliament.
  • Morris_DancerMorris_Dancer Posts: 48,591
    Mr. Jessop, no-one has ever accused Morris Dancer of using the quote system incorrectly :D

    As an aside, it remains the case that patronising people and starting a persuasion attempt with "Listen, stupid person who has been behaving idiotically..." is unlikely to convince them you're right. [Regardless of whether you are right or not].

    If we do have another referendum it'd be madness, and may happen, for Remain After All to focus on "You were fooled, dummies. Listen to the wisdom we generously pour upon thee!"
  • eekeek Posts: 3,387




    You have to take a big haircut to sell quickly and in a hurry.

    Yep - I've always found it strange how many landlords were happy to pay the asking price (or bid above the asking price) for what was a business / investment. Any sane would have tried to pay as little as possible...
  • RogerRoger Posts: 10,822
    ydoethur said:

    Roger said:

    Roger said:

    l

    Sean_F said:

    kle4 said:

    Scott_P said:
    "We were leading in the polls when the PM was trying to pass her deal. We stopped her. Now we are losing in the polls. It must be her fault!"

    I kid, she is a major problem not that this plotting is frontpage worthy news, but it is amusing how she got zero credit for them being in the lead against Labour, but I bet they think it all her fault now they are behind.
    One poster was correct that she needs to produce a picture book about Brexit for some of her MP's.

    "What does Barney the Brexit Dog say?" "Voting against Brexit means that Brexit doesn't happen"

    Mark Francois' single brain cell then starts whirring into life.

    "Oh right. Now I get it."

    There was once a family called Brexit. Mummy Brexit Daddy Brexit and Billy Brexit and they all lived in a little house in tiny village. One day some new neigbours moved in speaking a language that the Brexits couldn't understand.

    Mummy Brexit didn't like this so she got Daddy Brexit to drive a little white van around the village with a big sign saying 'Go away neigbours you aren't wanted here'.

    Daddy Brexit had left school when he was very young so he wasn't very clever and everybody called him 'thicko'. He loved driving this van because it was so very very white......

    One day Billy was walking to school
    And the final family member was Roger Brexit, who could not complete a story or use a quote system. ;)
    Just a synopsis and a couple of paragraphs! What do you expect-Harry Potter?
    Witch storyline were you planning to develop further?
    No holes barred. Hog warts and all
  • Morris_DancerMorris_Dancer Posts: 48,591
    Mr. Roger, this reminds me of the excerpt from the first Potter book, in which 'wand' is replaced with 'wang'. It fits alarmingly well.
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 17,394
    Roger said:

    ydoethur said:

    Roger said:

    Roger said:

    l

    Sean_F said:

    kle4 said:

    Scott_P said:
    "We were leading in the polls when the PM was trying to pass her deal. We stopped her. Now we are losing in the polls. It must be her fault!"

    I kid, she is a major problem not that this plotting is frontpage worthy news, but it is amusing how she got zero credit for them being in the lead against Labour, but I bet they think it all her fault now they are behind.
    One poster was correct that she needs to produce a picture book about Brexit for some of her MP's.

    "What does Barney the Brexit Dog say?" "Voting against Brexit means that Brexit doesn't happen"

    Mark Francois' single brain cell then starts whirring into life.

    "Oh right. Now I get it."

    There was once a family called Brexit. Mummy Brexit Daddy Brexit and Billy Brexit and they all lived in a little house in tiny village. One day some new neigbours moved in speaking a language that the Brexits couldn't understand.

    Mummy Brexit didn't like this so she got Daddy Brexit to drive a little white van around the village with a big sign saying 'Go away neigbours you aren't wanted here'.

    Daddy Brexit had left school when he was very young so he wasn't very clever and everybody called him 'thicko'. He loved driving this van because it was so very very white......

    One day Billy was walking to school
    And the final family member was Roger Brexit, who could not complete a story or use a quote system. ;)
    Just a synopsis and a couple of paragraphs! What do you expect-Harry Potter?
    Witch storyline were you planning to develop further?
    No holes barred. Hog warts and all
    No weasleying your way out of it. That was the Ron answer, and I will keep harrying you until I get a proper reply.
  • isamisam Posts: 25,352
    edited April 15
    ydoethur said:

    Roger said:

    Roger said:

    l

    Sean_F said:

    kle4 said:

    Scott_P said:
    "We were leading in the polls when the PM was trying to pass her deal. We stopped her. Now we are losing in the polls. It must be her fault!"

    I kid, she is a major problem not that this plotting is frontpage worthy news, but it is amusing how she got zero credit for them being in the lead against Labour, but I bet they think it all her fault now they are behind.
    One poster was correct that she needs to produce a picture book about Brexit for some of her MP's.

    "What does Barney the Brexit Dog say?" "Voting against Brexit means that Brexit doesn't happen"

    Mark Francois' single brain cell then starts whirring into life.

    "Oh right. Now I get it."

    There was once a family called Brexit. Mummy Brexit Daddy Brexit and Billy Brexit and they all lived in a little house in tiny village. One day some new neigbours moved in speaking a language that the Brexits couldn't understand.

    Mummy Brexit didn't like this so she got Daddy Brexit to drive a little white van around the village with a big sign saying 'Go away neigbours you aren't wanted here'.

    Daddy Brexit had left school when he was very young so he wasn't very clever and everybody called him 'thicko'. He loved driving this van because it was so very very white......

    One day Billy was walking to school
    And the final family member was Roger Brexit, who could not complete a story or use a quote system. ;)
    Just a synopsis and a couple of paragraphs! What do you expect-Harry Potter?
    Witch storyline were you planning to develop further?
    The old king in the big,rich city far, far away ignored the Brexits and left them to continue their miserable life while his courtiers portrayed everyone who disagreed with him as evil
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 17,394
    isam said:

    ydoethur said:

    Roger said:

    Roger said:

    l

    Sean_F said:

    kle4 said:

    Scott_P said:
    "We were leading in the polls when the PM was trying to pass her deal. We stopped her. Now we are losing in the polls. It must be her fault!"

    I kid, she is a major problem not that this plotting is frontpage worthy news, but it is amusing how she got zero credit for them being in the lead against Labour, but I bet they think it all her fault now they are behind.
    One poster was correct that she needs to produce a picture book about Brexit for some of her MP's.

    "What does Barney the Brexit Dog say?" "Voting against Brexit means that Brexit doesn't happen"

    Mark Francois' single brain cell then starts whirring into life.

    "Oh right. Now I get it."

    There was once a family called Brexit. Mummy Brexit Daddy Brexit and Billy Brexit and they all lived in a little house in tiny village. One day some new neigbours moved in speaking a language that the Brexits couldn't understand.

    Mummy Brexit didn't like this so she got Daddy Brexit to drive a little white van around the village with a big sign saying 'Go away neigbours you aren't wanted here'.

    Daddy Brexit had left school when he was very young so he wasn't very clever and everybody called him 'thicko'. He loved driving this van because it was so very very white......

    One day Billy was walking to school
    And the final family member was Roger Brexit, who could not complete a story or use a quote system. ;)
    Just a synopsis and a couple of paragraphs! What do you expect-Harry Potter?
    Witch storyline were you planning to develop further?
    The old king in the big,rich city far, far away ignored the Brexits and left them to continue their miserable life while his courtiers portrayed everyone who disagreed with him as evil
    Are you saying he made them farage for nuts and berries?
  • Yes, London has a more extreme problem than other cities, and in some parts of the country things are fine. London and the South East is around a quarter of the population, add in the regional towns and cities where its a problem and you are probably up to 35-45% of the population live in places where the gap between earnings and house prices is too big.

    For young people that % will be higher as they naturally tend to live in cities, especially those where there are more and better jobs.
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