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politicalbetting.com » Blog Archive » Corbyn’s first PMQs buzzword bingo

SystemSystem Posts: 5,841
edited September 2015 in General

imagepoliticalbetting.com » Blog Archive » Corbyn’s first PMQs buzzword bingo

These betting markets often appear to exist purely to fund the bookies’ bonus fund and I’m not sure I can see any value here, Punch and Judy at 5/1 might be the one to go for. Perhaps PBers might be more successful in identifying the value in this market.

Read the full story here


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Comments

  • DaemonBarberDaemonBarber Posts: 1,626
    edited September 2015
    Gotta be refugees innit?
  • TOPPINGTOPPING Posts: 12,733
    Comrades.

    bolted on.
  • JEOJEO Posts: 3,656

    Estobar said:

    Estobar said:

    Aside from the obvious by-election losses that could bring down Cameron before 2020: remember, it may only take 5 losses to fell him, there's another possibility.

    Suppose Corbyn does campaign for NO together with a sizeable chunk of the new Corbynistas. Allied with UKIP and the Tory eurosceptics this makes the NO vote suddenly a very attractive betting option.

    It also makes for another route whereby Cameron could be forced out. Can you imagine him campaigning to stay in, losing the vote and staying on?

    Corbyn campaigning to leave might cause more problems for the Labour Party than it would for Cameron and the Conservatives. Far more Labour MPs and supporters are wedded to the European project than Conservative MPs.

    I mean, it might even force thoroughly pro-EU Nick to divert from the party line. Or, given his recent behaviour, perhaps not ... :)
    No, I agree with that except that for Corbyn it's not a do or die issue for him and his party. It's not him that has stuck his neck on the block over a European vote. If Corbyn's true to his word, that people can say what the hell they like (wtf?!! Yay!) then it won't matter to Labour. Those who want to campaign No can, those who don't, won't. But for Cameron, losing the vote would mean stepping down I think?
    I think you're underestimating the affection within Labour, and particularly the PLP, for Europe.

    As for Cameron: I can see why some on the left might have wet dreams over Cameron resigning over a lost EU referendum, but it might not happen - it would depend on how it is played. And as I said the other day, there's always the chance that Cameron recommends a 'leave' vote.

    The only parties not particularly endangered by the referendum are the Lib Dems - who are consistently for staying in - and the SNP. There are dragons awaiting everyone else.
    I know no-one is predicting it, but if Cameron simply came out and said "Unfortunately, there are now major dangers to remaining in the EU, and unfortunately, there is a serious unwillingness to reform. We must remain close trading partners and allies, but union is no longer tenable" then he would cause Leave to win by a landslide.

    He would then be in control to negotiate a new trade treaty. If the UK then continued to grow (as it did after the ERM drop-out unexpectedly), while the EU stagnated under Euro and migrant problems, then he would be looked back on as one of the real big beasts of Tory Prime Ministers. Labour, Corbynista and Blairite alike, would be left floundering as they had to adjust to the new circumstances.
  • New kind of politics looks value.
  • New kind of politics looks tempting at sixes.
  • New kind of politics looks value.

    Snap!!
  • Is this a market on what Corbyn might say, or on what anyone might say in PMQs? The website is not clear.
  • Media
  • dr_spyndr_spyn Posts: 8,918
    Thatcher.
  • Is this a market on what Corbyn might say, or on what anyone might say in PMQs? The website is not clear.

    The market is

    "Which exact words or phrases will Corbyn use in his first PMQs"
  • ArtistArtist Posts: 1,399
    Considering the limited time he gets to speak, probably none of the above.
  • AndyJSAndyJS Posts: 21,869
    The ICM poll is identical to the general election result except for a 1% swing from Greens to Labour.
  • MTimTMTimT Posts: 6,658
    JEO said:

    Estobar said:

    Estobar said:

    Aside from the obvious by-election losses that could bring down Cameron before 2020: remember, it may only take 5 losses to fell him, there's another possibility.

    Suppose Corbyn does campaign for NO together with a sizeable chunk of the new Corbynistas. Allied with UKIP and the Tory eurosceptics this makes the NO vote suddenly a very attractive betting option.

    It also makes for another route whereby Cameron could be forced out. Can you imagine him campaigning to stay in, losing the vote and staying on?

    Corbyn campaigning to leave might cause more problems for the Labour Party than it would for Cameron and the Conservatives. Far more Labour MPs and supporters are wedded to the European project than Conservative MPs.

    I mean, it might even force thoroughly pro-EU Nick to divert from the party line. Or, given his recent behaviour, perhaps not ... :)
    No, I agree with that except that for Corbyn it's not a do or die issue for him and his party. It's not him that has stuck his neck on the block over a European vote. If Corbyn's true to his word, that people can say what the hell they like (wtf?!! Yay!) then it won't matter to Labour. Those who want to campaign No can, those who don't, won't. But for Cameron, losing the vote would mean stepping down I think?
    I think you're underestimating the affection within Labour, and particularly the PLP, for Europe.

    As for Cameron: I can see why some on the left might have wet dreams over Cameron resigning over a lost EU referendum, but it might not happen - it would depend on how it is played. And as I said the other day, there's always the chance that Cameron recommends a 'leave' vote.

    The only parties not particularly endangered by the referendum are the Lib Dems - who are consistently for staying in - and the SNP. There are dragons awaiting everyone else.
    I know no-one is predicting it, but if Cameron simply came out and said "Unfortunately, there are now major dangers to remaining in the EU, and unfortunately, there is a serious unwillingness to reform. We must remain close trading partners and allies, but union is no longer tenable" then he would cause Leave to win by a landslide.

    He would then be in control to negotiate a new trade treaty. If the UK then continued to grow (as it did after the ERM drop-out unexpectedly), while the EU stagnated under Euro and migrant problems, then he would be looked back on as one of the real big beasts of Tory Prime Ministers. Labour, Corbynista and Blairite alike, would be left floundering as they had to adjust to the new circumstances.
    100% agree
  • tysontyson Posts: 4,370
    edited September 2015
    "I know no-one is predicting it, but if Cameron simply came out and said "Unfortunately, there are now major dangers to remaining in the EU, and unfortunately, there is a serious unwillingness to reform. We must remain close trading partners and allies, but union is no longer tenable" then he would cause Leave to win by a landslide."

    @JosiasJessop

    If Cameron said that there would be a run on Sterling, all our pension pots and investments would half overnight, the banks would likely need further bailing out following another run, house prices will crash, most sane companies will make announcements to re-locate and we would be plunged into a terrifying depression that would well and truly bankrupt us. Oh- and he would make the Tories unelectable for a 100 years.

    On the positive side, it would sort out the refugee problem since no sane soul would want to come and live here. In fact conversely, swarms of destitute Brits might try their luck and take to their dinghies and plot a course for Dunkirk at the dead of night.

    JEO said:

    Estobar said:

    Estobar said:

    Aside from the obvious by-election losses that could bring down Cameron before 2020: remember, it may only take 5 losses to fell him, there's another possibility.

    Suppose Corbyn does campaign for NO together with a sizeable chunk of the new Corbynistas. Allied with UKIP and the Tory eurosceptics this makes the NO vote suddenly a very attractive betting option.

    It also makes for another route whereby Cameron could be forced out. Can you imagine him campaigning to stay in, losing the vote and staying on?

    Corbyn campaigning to leave might cause more problems for the Labour Party than it would for Cameron and the Conservatives. Far more Labour MPs and supporters are wedded to the European project than Conservative MPs.

    I mean, it might even force thoroughly pro-EU Nick to divert from the party line. Or, given his recent behaviour, perhaps not ... :)
    I know no-one is predicting it, but if Cameron simply came out and said "Unfortunately, there are now major dangers to remaining in the EU, and unfortunately, there is a serious unwillingness to reform. We must remain close trading partners and allies, but union is no longer tenable" then he would cause Leave to win by a landslide.

    He would then be in control to negotiate a new trade treaty. If the UK then continued to grow (as it did after the ERM drop-out unexpectedly), while the EU stagnated under Euro and migrant problems, then he would be looked back on as one of the real big beasts of Tory Prime Ministers. Labour, Corbynista and Blairite alike, would be left floundering as they had to adjust to the new circumstances.
  • Is this a market on what Corbyn might say, or on what anyone might say in PMQs? The website is not clear.

    The market is

    "Which exact words or phrases will Corbyn use in his first PMQs"
    Right, thanks. Where is that specified? The new website seems even worse than the previous one.
  • MTimTMTimT Posts: 6,658
    Hizbollah :) Or maybe 'Friends'
  • DavidLDavidL Posts: 19,839
    Interestingly gracious welcome from Javid this afternoon to Corbyn's first outing. My guess is that the Tories will feel no particular need to go for Corbyn's jugular and I expect Cameron to be on his best behaviour.

    The target of choice is going to be McConnell, partly because he is a series of words we are not supposed to use on this site, partly because so many in the Labour party itself clearly have reservations but ultimately because this appointment reflects more badly on Mr Corbyn's judgement than anything else he has done to date. The whole Alan Johnston episode did Ed a lot of damage and the Tories will be hoping to repeat it.

    On these words I agree with TSE. Shadsy is hoping to recoup some of his Corbyn losses. Avoid.
  • MikeKMikeK Posts: 9,053
    I'm unbanned, as well as nearly unmanned by all of Corbyn's/Labours antics.
  • Is this a market on what Corbyn might say, or on what anyone might say in PMQs? The website is not clear.

    The market is

    "Which exact words or phrases will Corbyn use in his first PMQs"
    Right, thanks. Where is that specified? The new website seems even worse than the previous one.
    From this tweet by Shadsy

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CO3Y_McWUAAqbod.png
  • JackWJackW Posts: 13,296
    Hamas, IRA and Malvinas would make an interesting trio ....
  • blackburn63blackburn63 Posts: 4,492
    edited September 2015
    I can't stick Cameron and would love somebody to trounce him at PMQs but I can't see Corbyn doing it. I'm intrigued to see how the labour back benchers behave towards him, can't help thinking a few will be willing Corbyn to crash and burn.
  • dr_spyndr_spyn Posts: 8,918
    "You know the cricket season has arrived when you hear the sound of leather on Brian Close."
  • CD13CD13 Posts: 4,344
    I think Mr Observer said it right on the last thread.

    "What is there is an out-of-touch class warrior with a selection of very dubious friends."

    It's so last century, it's embarrassing.

    Still it's kept me interested and I usually turn off between elections.
  • JackW said:

    Hamas, IRA and Malvinas would make an interesting trio ....

    As an accumulator?
  • CD13CD13 Posts: 4,344
    For word bingo, I suppose "Fascist running dog to the Capitalist hyena" is a bit dated even for Jezza.
  • DanSmithDanSmith Posts: 1,077
    DavidL said:

    Interestingly gracious welcome from Javid this afternoon to Corbyn's first outing. My guess is that the Tories will feel no particular need to go for Corbyn's jugular and I expect Cameron to be on his best behaviour.

    The target of choice is going to be McConnell, partly because he is a series of words we are not supposed to use on this site, partly because so many in the Labour party itself clearly have reservations but ultimately because this appointment reflects more badly on Mr Corbyn's judgement than anything else he has done to date. The whole Alan Johnston episode did Ed a lot of damage and the Tories will be hoping to repeat it.

    On these words I agree with TSE. Shadsy is hoping to recoup some of his Corbyn losses. Avoid.

    It's easy to forget how much the Tories hated Miliband's two faced behaviour (for example the way he behaved over Syria). They will dislike Corbyn but respect him because what you see is what you get.
  • Richard_NabaviRichard_Nabavi Posts: 18,218
    edited September 2015
    OK, a fiver on 'Thatcher' at 12/1. The guy is fixated with the great lady, and I'm thinking he might come up with 'the biggest attack on workers since Mrs Thatcher' or some such tosh.

    Edit: 'Inequality' is a pretty good guess but 1/2 is a bit mean. Ditto 'Poverty'
  • CyclefreeCyclefree Posts: 9,910
    @John_M: Thank you for your kind words on the previous thread.
  • GIN1138GIN1138 Posts: 11,005
    Is he definitely turning up for PMQ's?
  • MarqueeMarkMarqueeMark Posts: 17,604
    Wot - no "Bullingdon"?

    Skinner was on Jeremy Vine shortly after midday. I think he needs to say "Bullingdon" to take in oxygen....
  • No bets on what Cameron's buzzword will be?
    'Danger'. ??
  • TOPPINGTOPPING Posts: 12,733
    DanSmith said:

    DavidL said:

    Interestingly gracious welcome from Javid this afternoon to Corbyn's first outing. My guess is that the Tories will feel no particular need to go for Corbyn's jugular and I expect Cameron to be on his best behaviour.

    The target of choice is going to be McConnell, partly because he is a series of words we are not supposed to use on this site, partly because so many in the Labour party itself clearly have reservations but ultimately because this appointment reflects more badly on Mr Corbyn's judgement than anything else he has done to date. The whole Alan Johnston episode did Ed a lot of damage and the Tories will be hoping to repeat it.

    On these words I agree with TSE. Shadsy is hoping to recoup some of his Corbyn losses. Avoid.

    It's easy to forget how much the Tories hated Miliband's two faced behaviour (for example the way he behaved over Syria). They will dislike Corbyn but respect him because what you see is what you get.
    They should not dignify such an utter utter a***hole with any kind of respect whatsoever. He is dangerous and should be treated as such.

    I have backed "Comrades" to the full extent of the £12.50 shadsy has allowed me. But then again I backed Yvette. I am still getting used to this mad new world we live in. Perhaps it's even mad enough for Dave to treat Jezza with some kind of respect. Which would IMO put the icing on the cake of bonkersness we have seen of late.
  • TYSON... They could just catch a ferry...Whats with this dinghy thing.
  • SeanTSeanT Posts: 20,395
    edited September 2015
    The modest polling move is, I reckon, entirely down to immigration (hence the uptick for UKIP) and everything else is MOE.

    Remarkable, really, and shows how little attention the public is paying to Corbyn and the rest. Probably most people are only just now getting the vague sense that Labour have elected a rather unusual new leader with a beard called Jeremy Something.

    Difficult to predict where the polls will go herefrom. Perhaps the negativity surrounding Corbyn will exactly match the boost from all the publicity, and the polls will stay precisely where they are. Yawn.

  • GIN1138 said:

    Is he definitely turning up for PMQ's?

    The Right Honorable Jeremy Corbyn MP has confirmed he will be there this week.

  • SquareRootSquareRoot Posts: 5,492

    No bets on what Cameron's buzzword will be?
    'Danger'. ??

    He might mention Corbyn's Universally Nauseating Tie.
  • TudorRose said:

    New kind of politics looks tempting at sixes.

    What - yet another 'new kind of politics'? How many new 'new kinds of politics' can there be?
  • No bets on what Cameron's buzzword will be?
    'Danger'. ??

    'Threat' for sure.
  • LennonLennon Posts: 1,362
    edited September 2015
    SeanT said:

    The modest polling move is, I reckon, entirely down to immigration (hence the uptick for UKIP) and everything else is MOE.

    Remarkable, really, and shows how little attention the public is paying to Corbyn and the rest. Probably most people are only just now getting the vague sense that Labour have elected a rather unusual new leader with a beard called Jeremy Something.

    Difficult to predict where the polls will go herefrom. Perhaps the negativity surrounding Corbyn will exactly match the boost from all the publicity, and the polls will stay precisely where they are. Yawn.

    Saw a quote from a Labour canvasser in Haringey (upcoming local council by-election) along the lines of "Had 1 person ask me 'what's all this about this Geoffrey bloke then?'" A salutary reminder that for the most part politics utterly goes over the heads of most people who have better things to think about.
  • DanSmithDanSmith Posts: 1,077
    TOPPING said:

    DanSmith said:

    DavidL said:

    Interestingly gracious welcome from Javid this afternoon to Corbyn's first outing. My guess is that the Tories will feel no particular need to go for Corbyn's jugular and I expect Cameron to be on his best behaviour.

    The target of choice is going to be McConnell, partly because he is a series of words we are not supposed to use on this site, partly because so many in the Labour party itself clearly have reservations but ultimately because this appointment reflects more badly on Mr Corbyn's judgement than anything else he has done to date. The whole Alan Johnston episode did Ed a lot of damage and the Tories will be hoping to repeat it.

    On these words I agree with TSE. Shadsy is hoping to recoup some of his Corbyn losses. Avoid.

    It's easy to forget how much the Tories hated Miliband's two faced behaviour (for example the way he behaved over Syria). They will dislike Corbyn but respect him because what you see is what you get.
    They should not dignify such an utter utter a***hole with any kind of respect whatsoever. He is dangerous and should be treated as such.

    I have backed "Comrades" to the full extent of the £12.50 shadsy has allowed me. But then again I backed Yvette. I am still getting used to this mad new world we live in. Perhaps it's even mad enough for Dave to treat Jezza with some kind of respect. Which would IMO put the icing on the cake of bonkersness we have seen of late.
    Oh behave.
  • IcarusIcarus Posts: 487
    Is the closest parallel to the recent goings on in the Labour Party Perestroika? All started as the hope of a new beginning.

    Perhaps we should be looking for a Putin.
  • SeanT said:

    The modest polling move is, I reckon, entirely down to immigration (hence the uptick for UKIP) and everything else is MOE.

    Remarkable, really, and shows how little attention the public is paying to Corbyn and the rest. Probably most people are only just now getting the vague sense that Labour have elected a rather unusual new leader with a beard called Jeremy Something.

    Difficult to predict where the polls will go herefrom. Perhaps the negativity surrounding Corbyn will exactly match the boost from all the publicity, and the polls will stay precisely where they are. Yawn.

    Presumably the fieldwork for this poll was conducted before the weekend
  • Plato_SaysPlato_Says Posts: 11,822
    ICM 11-13th so before ShadCab appts

    SeanT said:

    The modest polling move is, I reckon, entirely down to immigration (hence the uptick for UKIP) and everything else is MOE.

    Remarkable, really, and shows how little attention the public is paying to Corbyn and the rest. Probably most people are only just now getting the vague sense that Labour have elected a rather unusual new leader with a beard called Jeremy Something.

    Difficult to predict where the polls will go herefrom. Perhaps the negativity surrounding Corbyn will exactly match the boost from all the publicity, and the polls will stay precisely where they are. Yawn.

    Presumably the fieldwork for this poll was conducted before the weekend
  • tysontyson Posts: 4,370
    I don't think they'll even dislike Corbyn to be honest. Disagree with is probably more fitting because I am convinced Corbyn will never stoop to playing the man which will make a refreshing change.

    I think alot of people will grow to like Corbyn- even some of our pbCOM loons. I don't think Corbyn's integrity and way of conducting himself will translate to votes, but it will earn him a great deal of cross party respect. Politics will become much more civilised with Corbyn around.

    BTW- the Tory attack ad is pretty pathetic. Corbyn's reference to Hamas and Hizbollah as friends (commonly used by Muslims) was simply a show of manners and taken out of context. I doubt very much that Corbyn will use such sneaky, manipulative PR stuff to score points over the Tories.

    DanSmith said:

    DavidL said:

    Interestingly gracious welcome from Javid this afternoon to Corbyn's first outing. My guess is that the Tories will feel no particular need to go for Corbyn's jugular and I expect Cameron to be on his best behaviour.

    The target of choice is going to be McConnell, partly because he is a series of words we are not supposed to use on this site, partly because so many in the Labour party itself clearly have reservations but ultimately because this appointment reflects more badly on Mr Corbyn's judgement than anything else he has done to date. The whole Alan Johnston episode did Ed a lot of damage and the Tories will be hoping to repeat it.

    On these words I agree with TSE. Shadsy is hoping to recoup some of his Corbyn losses. Avoid.

    It's easy to forget how much the Tories hated Miliband's two faced behaviour (for example the way he behaved over Syria). They will dislike Corbyn but respect him because what you see is what you get.
  • DavidLDavidL Posts: 19,839
    DanSmith said:

    DavidL said:

    Interestingly gracious welcome from Javid this afternoon to Corbyn's first outing. My guess is that the Tories will feel no particular need to go for Corbyn's jugular and I expect Cameron to be on his best behaviour.

    The target of choice is going to be McConnell, partly because he is a series of words we are not supposed to use on this site, partly because so many in the Labour party itself clearly have reservations but ultimately because this appointment reflects more badly on Mr Corbyn's judgement than anything else he has done to date. The whole Alan Johnston episode did Ed a lot of damage and the Tories will be hoping to repeat it.

    On these words I agree with TSE. Shadsy is hoping to recoup some of his Corbyn losses. Avoid.

    It's easy to forget how much the Tories hated Miliband's two faced behaviour (for example the way he behaved over Syria). They will dislike Corbyn but respect him because what you see is what you get.
    That's a fair point. Disdain turned to contempt after Syria.
  • Peter Kellner writes -- "About 70,000 people who voted in the leadership election did not vote Labour in the general election. Some 40,000 voted Green and 96 per cent of these Green voters backed Mr Corbyn. We estimate that the other non-Labour voters were: Liberal Democrats: 10,000; Conservatives: 3,000; Ukip: 3,000; other parties 6,000; did not vote 8,000."

    What goes on at PMQs will be the least interesting and least relevant issue for now. What will be interesting and possibly entertaining is what happens inside the Labour Party and the changes to its internal rules.
  • GIN1138 said:

    Is he definitely turning up for PMQ's?

    The Right Honorable Jeremy Corbyn MP has confirmed he will be there this week.

    He's not Right Honourable yet, is he?
  • After his ‘walk of silence’ Corbyn may end up saying nothing…
  • DavidLDavidL Posts: 19,839

    OK, a fiver on 'Thatcher' at 12/1. The guy is fixated with the great lady, and I'm thinking he might come up with 'the biggest attack on workers since Mrs Thatcher' or some such tosh.

    Edit: 'Inequality' is a pretty good guess but 1/2 is a bit mean. Ditto 'Poverty'

    Mistake. Mentioning "Thatcher" allows Cameron to ask if the Shadow Chancellor would still want to assassinate her given the chance. Too easy a hit. He will avoid it.

    Inequality and poverty much better bets.
  • Richard_NabaviRichard_Nabavi Posts: 18,218
    edited September 2015
    DavidL said:

    OK, a fiver on 'Thatcher' at 12/1. The guy is fixated with the great lady, and I'm thinking he might come up with 'the biggest attack on workers since Mrs Thatcher' or some such tosh.

    Edit: 'Inequality' is a pretty good guess but 1/2 is a bit mean. Ditto 'Poverty'

    Mistake. Mentioning "Thatcher" allows Cameron to ask if the Shadow Chancellor would still want to assassinate her given the chance. Too easy a hit. He will avoid it.
    Almost any subject he mentions will have that snag, or a similar one.
  • GIN1138 said:

    Is he definitely turning up for PMQ's?

    The Right Honorable Jeremy Corbyn MP has confirmed he will be there this week.

    Presumably he also confirmed his attendance on Andrew Marr and on the Today programme?
  • AnorakAnorak Posts: 4,293
    FPT:
    AndyJS said:

    Corbyn, McDonnell and Abbott now sitting on the opposition front bench.

    I was reading through the thread and that comment brought me up short. I then came out with an involuntary, shrill giggle.

    It was the moment when it actually sunk in that this is actually happening.
  • GIN1138 said:

    Is he definitely turning up for PMQ's?

    The Right Honorable Jeremy Corbyn MP has confirmed he will be there this week.

    He's not Right Honourable yet, is he?
    He has indicated that he will accept the invitation to join the Privy Council. So it is only a matter of tmie...
  • AndyJSAndyJS Posts: 21,869
    Dennis Skinner vs Emily Maitlis:

  • EstobarEstobar Posts: 558
    DavidL said:

    OK, a fiver on 'Thatcher' at 12/1. The guy is fixated with the great lady, and I'm thinking he might come up with 'the biggest attack on workers since Mrs Thatcher' or some such tosh.

    Edit: 'Inequality' is a pretty good guess but 1/2 is a bit mean. Ditto 'Poverty'

    Mistake. Mentioning "Thatcher" allows Cameron to ask if the Shadow Chancellor would still want to assassinate her given the chance. Too easy a hit. He will avoid it.

    Inequality and poverty much better bets.
    Despite the fact half the country or more would love to have done? (As hyperbole.)
  • DavidLDavidL Posts: 19,839
    edited September 2015

    DavidL said:

    OK, a fiver on 'Thatcher' at 12/1. The guy is fixated with the great lady, and I'm thinking he might come up with 'the biggest attack on workers since Mrs Thatcher' or some such tosh.

    Edit: 'Inequality' is a pretty good guess but 1/2 is a bit mean. Ditto 'Poverty'

    Mistake. Mentioning "Thatcher" allows Cameron to ask if the Shadow Chancellor would still want to assassinate her given the chance. Too easy a hit. He will avoid it.
    Almost any subject he mentions will have that snag, or a similar one.
    Hmm...

    Meanwhile some of McDonnell's baggage arrives at the office of the Shadow Chancellor:
    http://i.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/archive/02180/baggage_2180569b.jpg

    Edit. Apologies did not expect a link like that.
  • Hmm. Corbyn said 'comradeship' twice in his victory speech. I'm guessing this wouldn't count for 'comrades'.
  • Plato_SaysPlato_Says Posts: 11,822
    I don't think it'll really sink in for me until he stands up at PMQs - and not from the back benches.
    Anorak said:

    FPT:

    AndyJS said:

    Corbyn, McDonnell and Abbott now sitting on the opposition front bench.

    I was reading through the thread and that comment brought me up short. I then came out with an involuntary, shrill giggle.

    It was the moment when it actually sunk in that this is actually happening.
  • LennonLennon Posts: 1,362

    Peter Kellner writes -- "About 70,000 people who voted in the leadership election did not vote Labour in the general election. Some 40,000 voted Green and 96 per cent of these Green voters backed Mr Corbyn. We estimate that the other non-Labour voters were: Liberal Democrats: 10,000; Conservatives: 3,000; Ukip: 3,000; other parties 6,000; did not vote 8,000."

    What goes on at PMQs will be the least interesting and least relevant issue for now. What will be interesting and possibly entertaining is what happens inside the Labour Party and the changes to its internal rules.

    An additionally interesting aside is what happens to the Green Party. If even 30% of that 40,000 were previously Green members rather than just voters then that's over 10,000 members that they have just lost... That'll make quite a difference in some places.
  • EstobarEstobar Posts: 558



    What goes on at PMQs will be the least interesting and least relevant issue for now. What will be interesting and possibly entertaining is what happens inside the Labour Party and the changes to its internal rules.

    Why? Given that there's nothing surprising or interesting about Peter Kellner's figures, except that the alleged mass infiltration by Tories never materialised and they were all left-leaning voters, why is it of any interest?

    The agenda will swiftly move on now that the media are getting over, and getting used, to the shape of the shadow. It'll all be policy debate for a while.
  • Estobar said:

    DavidL said:

    OK, a fiver on 'Thatcher' at 12/1. The guy is fixated with the great lady, and I'm thinking he might come up with 'the biggest attack on workers since Mrs Thatcher' or some such tosh.

    Edit: 'Inequality' is a pretty good guess but 1/2 is a bit mean. Ditto 'Poverty'

    Mistake. Mentioning "Thatcher" allows Cameron to ask if the Shadow Chancellor would still want to assassinate her given the chance. Too easy a hit. He will avoid it.

    Inequality and poverty much better bets.
    Despite the fact half the country or more would love to have done? (As hyperbole.)
    Half the Country would love to have 'assassinated' her. Do you think before you spout such rubbish
  • EstobarEstobar Posts: 558

    After his ‘walk of silence’ Corbyn may end up saying nothing…


    There's a difference between PMQ's and ignoring one of Murdoch's tossers.
  • dr_spyndr_spyn Posts: 8,918
    Estobar said:

    After his ‘walk of silence’ Corbyn may end up saying nothing…


    There's a difference between PMQ's and ignoring one of Murdoch's tossers.
    Yawn.
  • tysontyson Posts: 4,370
    Topping- I have just gone through all my emails from Corbyn. There is not one bit of personal malice from him against the Tories- he writes only about the impact of Tory policies on the poor. I don't think Corbyn particularly hates anyone, even Tories. I think he believes that Tories only serve the interests of business and the wealthy.

    Corbyn has his views which you may disagree with, but as far as I can see he is not nasty, scheming, underhand, personal, vindictive in anyway. He actually comes across as a gentle, thoughtful man who has some deep convictions.

    Referring to him as an a...hole says much more about you than it does him quite frankly
    TOPPING said:

    DanSmith said:

    DavidL said:

    Interestingly gracious welcome from Javid this afternoon to Corbyn's first outing. My guess is that the Tories will feel no particular need to go for Corbyn's jugular and I expect Cameron to be on his best behaviour.

    The target of choice is going to be McConnell, partly because he is a series of words we are not supposed to use on this site, partly because so many in the Labour party itself clearly have reservations but ultimately because this appointment reflects more badly on Mr Corbyn's judgement than anything else he has done to date. The whole Alan Johnston episode did Ed a lot of damage and the Tories will be hoping to repeat it.

    On these words I agree with TSE. Shadsy is hoping to recoup some of his Corbyn losses. Avoid.

    It's easy to forget how much the Tories hated Miliband's two faced behaviour (for example the way he behaved over Syria). They will dislike Corbyn but respect him because what you see is what you get.
    They should not dignify such an utter utter a***hole with any kind of respect whatsoever. He is dangerous and should be treated as such.

    I have backed "Comrades" to the full extent of the £12.50 shadsy has allowed me. But then again I backed Yvette. I am still getting used to this mad new world we live in. Perhaps it's even mad enough for Dave to treat Jezza with some kind of respect. Which would IMO put the icing on the cake of bonkersness we have seen of late.
  • AnorakAnorak Posts: 4,293
    DavidL said:

    DavidL said:

    OK, a fiver on 'Thatcher' at 12/1. The guy is fixated with the great lady, and I'm thinking he might come up with 'the biggest attack on workers since Mrs Thatcher' or some such tosh.

    Edit: 'Inequality' is a pretty good guess but 1/2 is a bit mean. Ditto 'Poverty'

    Mistake. Mentioning "Thatcher" allows Cameron to ask if the Shadow Chancellor would still want to assassinate her given the chance. Too easy a hit. He will avoid it.
    Almost any subject he mentions will have that snag, or a similar one.
    Hmm...

    Meanwhile some of McDonnell's baggage arrives at the office of the Shadow Chancellor:
    *snip*

    Edit. Apologies did not expect a link like that.
    Might I suggest: http://www.tjoolaard.be/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/luggage.jpg
  • Bear in mind that Ed Miliband exceeded debate expectations by dint of those expectations involving him soiling himself and falling off the stage, and he didn't [well, half-didn't].

    Tribal loyalty and baying Tories will get at least some support for Corbyn, and his questions could be so left field Cameron might not have an answer.
  • EstobarEstobar Posts: 558
    DanSmith said:

    DavidL said:

    Interestingly gracious welcome from Javid this afternoon to Corbyn's first outing. My guess is that the Tories will feel no particular need to go for Corbyn's jugular and I expect Cameron to be on his best behaviour.

    The target of choice is going to be McConnell, partly because he is a series of words we are not supposed to use on this site, partly because so many in the Labour party itself clearly have reservations but ultimately because this appointment reflects more badly on Mr Corbyn's judgement than anything else he has done to date. The whole Alan Johnston episode did Ed a lot of damage and the Tories will be hoping to repeat it.

    On these words I agree with TSE. Shadsy is hoping to recoup some of his Corbyn losses. Avoid.

    It's easy to forget how much the Tories hated Miliband's two faced behaviour (for example the way he behaved over Syria). They will dislike Corbyn but respect him because what you see is what you get.
    Agreed. Miliband was, like most Blairites, a two-faced giant turd on foreign policy.

    Corbyn's consistent. Some will say consistently wrong, but still consistent. And given Cameron's massive volte-face over who he wants to bomb I doubt whether he will be too cocky on it.
  • DavidLDavidL Posts: 19,839
    Estobar said:

    DavidL said:

    OK, a fiver on 'Thatcher' at 12/1. The guy is fixated with the great lady, and I'm thinking he might come up with 'the biggest attack on workers since Mrs Thatcher' or some such tosh.

    Edit: 'Inequality' is a pretty good guess but 1/2 is a bit mean. Ditto 'Poverty'

    Mistake. Mentioning "Thatcher" allows Cameron to ask if the Shadow Chancellor would still want to assassinate her given the chance. Too easy a hit. He will avoid it.

    Inequality and poverty much better bets.
    Despite the fact half the country or more would love to have done? (As hyperbole.)
    Yes, even if that were true, which it is not, we do not elect psychopathic lunatics (see, for example, Gordon Brown).
  • TOPPINGTOPPING Posts: 12,733
    tyson said:

    Topping- I have just gone through all my emails from Corbyn. There is not one bit of personal malice from him against the Tories- he writes only about the impact of Tory policies on the poor. I don't think Corbyn particularly hates anyone, even Tories. I think he believes that Tories only serve the interests of business and the wealthy.

    Corbyn has his views which you may disagree with, but as far as I can see he is not nasty, scheming, underhand, personal, vindictive in anyway. He actually comes across as a gentle, thoughtful man who has some deep convictions.

    Referring to him as an a...hole says much more about you than it does him quite frankly

    TOPPING said:

    DanSmith said:

    DavidL said:

    Interestingly gracious welcome from Javid this afternoon to Corbyn's first outing. My guess is that the Tories will feel no particular need to go for Corbyn's jugular and I expect Cameron to be on his best behaviour.

    The target of choice is going to be McConnell, partly because he is a series of words we are not supposed to use on this site, partly because so many in the Labour party itself clearly have reservations but ultimately because this appointment reflects more badly on Mr Corbyn's judgement than anything else he has done to date. The whole Alan Johnston episode did Ed a lot of damage and the Tories will be hoping to repeat it.

    On these words I agree with TSE. Shadsy is hoping to recoup some of his Corbyn losses. Avoid.

    It's easy to forget how much the Tories hated Miliband's two faced behaviour (for example the way he behaved over Syria). They will dislike Corbyn but respect him because what you see is what you get.
    They should not dignify such an utter utter a***hole with any kind of respect whatsoever. He is dangerous and should be treated as such.

    I have backed "Comrades" to the full extent of the £12.50 shadsy has allowed me. But then again I backed Yvette. I am still getting used to this mad new world we live in. Perhaps it's even mad enough for Dave to treat Jezza with some kind of respect. Which would IMO put the icing on the cake of bonkersness we have seen of late.
    Happy to wear that badge with pride.

    By his friends shall you know him.

  • AndyJSAndyJS Posts: 21,869
    edited September 2015
    David Goodhart — "Jeremy Corbyn's election is a symptom of the withering of mainstream social democracy
    --------------------------------------------------------
    One final observation. The great British public are due an apology from me and everyone else who writes about politics: we did not notice the complete transformation of the second largest political party in the country. If the figure given by Tom Baldwin (a leading adviser to Ed Miliband) is correct then only 10 per cent of the electorate who voted in the 2010 leadership election, were also eligible to vote in the 2015 election. This is remarkable and represents a significant failure of the commentariat.

    I am even a member of the Labour party in Islington North, the constituency that elects Jeremy Corbyn to parliament every few years, and I did not have the first inkling that the Labour Party had become such a different creature in the last two or three years. But in mitigation: I am proud to say I did not vote for him at the general election."


    http://www.prospectmagazine.co.uk/politics/labour-leadership-does-it-matter-if-the-left-is-unelectable
  • EstobarEstobar Posts: 558
    DavidL said:

    Estobar said:

    DavidL said:

    OK, a fiver on 'Thatcher' at 12/1. The guy is fixated with the great lady, and I'm thinking he might come up with 'the biggest attack on workers since Mrs Thatcher' or some such tosh.

    Edit: 'Inequality' is a pretty good guess but 1/2 is a bit mean. Ditto 'Poverty'

    Mistake. Mentioning "Thatcher" allows Cameron to ask if the Shadow Chancellor would still want to assassinate her given the chance. Too easy a hit. He will avoid it.

    Inequality and poverty much better bets.
    Despite the fact half the country or more would love to have done? (As hyperbole.)
    Yes, even if that were true, which it is not, we do not elect psychopathic lunatics (see, for example, Gordon Brown).
    More name calling
  • Plato_SaysPlato_Says Posts: 11,822
    edited September 2015
    Do you do much except find people to hate? If so, perhaps a little less hyperbolic vitriol would be wise.

    BTW, I think you missed my question earlier - who did you vote for at the GE2020? And did you vote for Jezza as leader or just like him?
    Estobar said:

    After his ‘walk of silence’ Corbyn may end up saying nothing…


    There's a difference between PMQ's and ignoring one of Murdoch's tossers.
  • HurstLlamaHurstLlama Posts: 9,098
    tyson said:

    I don't think they'll even dislike Corbyn to be honest. Disagree with is probably more fitting because I am convinced Corbyn will never stoop to playing the man which will make a refreshing change.

    I think alot of people will grow to like Corbyn- even some of our pbCOM loons. I don't think Corbyn's integrity and way of conducting himself will translate to votes, but it will earn him a great deal of cross party respect. Politics will become much more civilised with Corbyn around.

    BTW- the Tory attack ad is pretty pathetic. Corbyn's reference to Hamas and Hizbollah as friends (commonly used by Muslims) was simply a show of manners and taken out of context. I doubt very much that Corbyn will use such sneaky, manipulative PR stuff to score points over the Tories.



    DanSmith said:

    DavidL said:

    Interestingly gracious welcome from Javid this afternoon to Corbyn's first outing. My guess is that the Tories will feel no particular need to go for Corbyn's jugular and I expect Cameron to be on his best behaviour.

    The target of choice is going to be McConnell, partly because he is a series of words we are not supposed to use on this site, partly because so many in the Labour party itself clearly have reservations but ultimately because this appointment reflects more badly on Mr Corbyn's judgement than anything else he has done to date. The whole Alan Johnston episode did Ed a lot of damage and the Tories will be hoping to repeat it.

    On these words I agree with TSE. Shadsy is hoping to recoup some of his Corbyn losses. Avoid.

    It's easy to forget how much the Tories hated Miliband's two faced behaviour (for example the way he behaved over Syria). They will dislike Corbyn but respect him because what you see is what you get.
    I am sorry, Mr. Tyson, but your post so much reminded me of the Monty Python sketch about the Piranaha brothers. In which Dynsdale is described as a lovely bloke who sent his mum flowers and everything.

    As we are starting to see Corbyn is not really that nice, friendly chap who is always willing to debate ideas with anyone. What we see might be what we get but we ain't seen much so far and what little we have seen, when he is taken away from his comfort zone, doesn't bode well.
  • Mr. L, not lunatics, but psychopathology can be a substantial advantage in business, politics or the military. There's an interesting strand of thought that certain psych conditions, whilst potentially debilitating, can lead to advantages (bipolar creativity, savant genius, psychopaths being fantastic [if occasionally murderous] leaders).

    John Tzimisces brutally kicked his predecessor as emperor to death, and then reigned successfully for years.
  • DavidLDavidL Posts: 19,839
    Anorak said:

    DavidL said:

    DavidL said:

    OK, a fiver on 'Thatcher' at 12/1. The guy is fixated with the great lady, and I'm thinking he might come up with 'the biggest attack on workers since Mrs Thatcher' or some such tosh.

    Edit: 'Inequality' is a pretty good guess but 1/2 is a bit mean. Ditto 'Poverty'

    Mistake. Mentioning "Thatcher" allows Cameron to ask if the Shadow Chancellor would still want to assassinate her given the chance. Too easy a hit. He will avoid it.
    Almost any subject he mentions will have that snag, or a similar one.
    Hmm...

    Meanwhile some of McDonnell's baggage arrives at the office of the Shadow Chancellor:
    *snip*

    Edit. Apologies did not expect a link like that.
    Might I suggest: http://www.tjoolaard.be/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/luggage.jpg
    Very good. TBH by the time I had edited it twice I was starting to think a weak joke was getting a tad laboured. Hey ho.
  • DavidL said:

    OK, a fiver on 'Thatcher' at 12/1. The guy is fixated with the great lady, and I'm thinking he might come up with 'the biggest attack on workers since Mrs Thatcher' or some such tosh.

    Edit: 'Inequality' is a pretty good guess but 1/2 is a bit mean. Ditto 'Poverty'

    Mistake. Mentioning "Thatcher" allows Cameron to ask if the Shadow Chancellor would still want to assassinate her given the chance. Too easy a hit. He will avoid it.

    Inequality and poverty much better bets.
    inequality claims are pretty bogus too. So he is on weak ground so where you look. It's a bad 'proxy' for poverty - which we should worry about.
    'Globally, inequality has been falling for decades because poor countries such China and India have grown much, much more rapidly than the developed world. But within-country inequality in these countries is often rising, because it is the middle classes that benefit most from this growth. Even though poor people are still getting substantially richer in these places, anyone looking at equality statistics would conclude that things are getting worse. That's nonsense'
    http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/jeremy-corbyn-inequality-myth-sorry-labour-lefties-your-new-messiah-will-not-help-poor-1519216

    If I have a mobile phone for £50 and someone else one for £500 then where am I unequal? How many people are denied a mobile phone because of inequality?
  • NickPalmerNickPalmer Posts: 10,335
    Austerity looks good value even at 1-3.
    Lennon said:

    Peter Kellner writes -- "About 70,000 people who voted in the leadership election did not vote Labour in the general election. Some 40,000 voted Green and 96 per cent of these Green voters backed Mr Corbyn. We estimate that the other non-Labour voters were: Liberal Democrats: 10,000; Conservatives: 3,000; Ukip: 3,000; other parties 6,000; did not vote 8,000."

    What goes on at PMQs will be the least interesting and least relevant issue for now. What will be interesting and possibly entertaining is what happens inside the Labour Party and the changes to its internal rules.

    An additionally interesting aside is what happens to the Green Party. If even 30% of that 40,000 were previously Green members rather than just voters then that's over 10,000 members that they have just lost... That'll make quite a difference in some places.
    I've chatted/emailed with four local Greens. Two are rejoining Labour (both left over our perceived centrism), the others not, though they said they'd like to see some cooperation on joint campaigns. Anecdotes, obviously, but probably not untypical.
  • EstobarEstobar Posts: 558

    Estobar said:

    DavidL said:

    OK, a fiver on 'Thatcher' at 12/1. The guy is fixated with the great lady, and I'm thinking he might come up with 'the biggest attack on workers since Mrs Thatcher' or some such tosh.

    Edit: 'Inequality' is a pretty good guess but 1/2 is a bit mean. Ditto 'Poverty'

    Mistake. Mentioning "Thatcher" allows Cameron to ask if the Shadow Chancellor would still want to assassinate her given the chance. Too easy a hit. He will avoid it.

    Inequality and poverty much better bets.
    Despite the fact half the country or more would love to have done? (As hyperbole.)
    Half the Country would love to have 'assassinated' her. Do you think before you spout such rubbish

    I do. Thatcher was the most divisive politician of the twentieth century by all measures. I can't really be bothered to give you a history lesson on it. Have a look at YouTube on the poll tax riots to remind yourself. That's not a comment on whether she was right or wrong. She was just incredible divisive and even now if you speak her name people a significant number of people will well up in a near-allergic reaction. Go to some parts of the country and try and deny this at your peril.
  • IcarusIcarus Posts: 487
    edited September 2015
    Anorak said:

    DavidL said:

    DavidL said:

    OK, a fiver on 'Thatcher' at 12/1. The guy is fixated with the great lady, and I'm thinking he might come up with 'the biggest attack on workers since Mrs Thatcher' or some such tosh.

    Edit: 'Inequality' is a pretty good guess but 1/2 is a bit mean. Ditto 'Poverty'

    Mistake. Mentioning "Thatcher" allows Cameron to ask if the Shadow Chancellor would still want to assassinate her given the chance. Too easy a hit. He will avoid it.
    Almost any subject he mentions will have that snag, or a similar one.
    Hmm...

    Meanwhile some of McDonnell's baggage arrives at the office of the Shadow Chancellor:
    *snip*

    Edit. Apologies did not expect a link like that.
    Might I suggest: http://www.tjoolaard.be/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/luggage.jpg
    A bit like my 5 year old granddaughter who typed "toys" into Google - thought the results were too babyish so put "big girls toys" my wife got a shock!
  • MikeKMikeK Posts: 9,053
    SeanT said:

    The modest polling move is, I reckon, entirely down to immigration (hence the uptick for UKIP) and everything else is MOE.

    Remarkable, really, and shows how little attention the public is paying to Corbyn and the rest. Probably most people are only just now getting the vague sense that Labour have elected a rather unusual new leader with a beard called Jeremy Something.

    Difficult to predict where the polls will go herefrom. Perhaps the negativity surrounding Corbyn will exactly match the boost from all the publicity, and the polls will stay precisely where they are. Yawn.

    The polling leap for UKIP, if it can be called a leap, can be attributed to the Corbyn Coronation as well as the migrant invasion.

    I saw a tweet this morning from UKIPer in Cornwall, of all places, that said that 90 or so new recruits have joined directly from the local labour party/ies, since Corbyn won the leadership. Trouble is I now find that I lost the link.
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 30,361
    AndyJS said:

    Dennis Skinner vs Emily Maitlis:

    Do these people think everyone works for Murdoch? I bet they blame traffic wardens for working for Murdoch if they get a ticket. (though apparently they are no longer referred to as Traffic Wardens)
  • DavidLDavidL Posts: 19,839

    Mr. L, not lunatics, but psychopathology can be a substantial advantage in business, politics or the military. There's an interesting strand of thought that certain psych conditions, whilst potentially debilitating, can lead to advantages (bipolar creativity, savant genius, psychopaths being fantastic [if occasionally murderous] leaders).

    John Tzimisces brutally kicked his predecessor as emperor to death, and then reigned successfully for years.

    Brown did something similar but was not at all successful.
  • TudorRoseTudorRose Posts: 874
    edited September 2015
    See above/below (still getting to grips with edits!)
  • AndyJSAndyJS Posts: 21,869
    Estobar said:

    Estobar said:

    DavidL said:

    OK, a fiver on 'Thatcher' at 12/1. The guy is fixated with the great lady, and I'm thinking he might come up with 'the biggest attack on workers since Mrs Thatcher' or some such tosh.

    Edit: 'Inequality' is a pretty good guess but 1/2 is a bit mean. Ditto 'Poverty'

    Mistake. Mentioning "Thatcher" allows Cameron to ask if the Shadow Chancellor would still want to assassinate her given the chance. Too easy a hit. He will avoid it.

    Inequality and poverty much better bets.
    Despite the fact half the country or more would love to have done? (As hyperbole.)
    Half the Country would love to have 'assassinated' her. Do you think before you spout such rubbish

    I do. Thatcher was the most divisive politician of the twentieth century by all measures. I can't really be bothered to give you a history lesson on it. Have a look at YouTube on the poll tax riots to remind yourself. That's not a comment on whether she was right or wrong. She was just incredible divisive and even now if you speak her name people a significant number of people will well up in a near-allergic reaction. Go to some parts of the country and try and deny this at your peril.
    Half the people on council estates in Liverpool and Glasgow may have wanted to do so. But not half the country.
  • EstobarEstobar Posts: 558
    edited September 2015

    Do you do much except find people to hate? If so, perhaps a little less hyperbolic vitriol would be wise.

    BTW, I think you missed my question earlier - who did you vote for at the GE2020? And did you vote for Jezza as leader or just like him?

    Estobar said:

    After his ‘walk of silence’ Corbyn may end up saying nothing…


    There's a difference between PMQ's and ignoring one of Murdoch's tossers.
    I did miss it. Yes, I voted for Corbyn.

    I think you under-estimate how much dislike there is 'out there' for the MSM especially the Murdoch machine and right-wing rags. They have whipped up disgusting sentiment against 'migrants' and against Corbyn with totally unjustified personal attacks.
  • CharlesCharles Posts: 19,420
    @Cyclefree FPT

    I might be tempted to join, although generations of ancestors would disapprove.

    Only three (main) issues for you to fix first:

    1. Papal infallibility - a little arrogant, no?
    2. Marianism - mother fixation?
    3. Transubstantiation - nah. That's just silly.

    :)
  • TudorRose said:

    Bear in mind that Ed Miliband exceeded debate expectations by dint of those expectations involving him soiling himself and falling off the stage, and he didn't [well, half-didn't].

    Tribal loyalty and baying Tories will get at least some support for Corbyn, and his questions could be so left field Cameron might not have an answer.

    Or something like 'Does the PM not recognise that his policy on - choose your policy here - represents a significant threat to global - peace/harmony/wealth/equality/platitude of choice -?'
  • I have the feeling that Mr Estobar was not very old when Mrs Thatcher was PM..He may not even been a twinkle in is daddy,s eye..
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 30,361
    DavidL said:

    DanSmith said:

    DavidL said:

    Interestingly gracious welcome from Javid this afternoon to Corbyn's first outing. My guess is that the Tories will feel no particular need to go for Corbyn's jugular and I expect Cameron to be on his best behaviour.

    The target of choice is going to be McConnell, partly because he is a series of words we are not supposed to use on this site, partly because so many in the Labour party itself clearly have reservations but ultimately because this appointment reflects more badly on Mr Corbyn's judgement than anything else he has done to date. The whole Alan Johnston episode did Ed a lot of damage and the Tories will be hoping to repeat it.

    On these words I agree with TSE. Shadsy is hoping to recoup some of his Corbyn losses. Avoid.

    It's easy to forget how much the Tories hated Miliband's two faced behaviour (for example the way he behaved over Syria). They will dislike Corbyn but respect him because what you see is what you get.
    That's a fair point. Disdain turned to contempt after Syria.
    I didn't mind Ed M even after then, I thought he'd be an ok PM, but that incident was one of his lowest for me. Not for the vote itself, or even supposed promises made to the PM which he broke, but the ballsiness of claiming to intended to prevent any bombing at any point, when they was not the purpose of the Labour amendment. It was as close to a falsehood as you get in politics.
  • Plato_SaysPlato_Says Posts: 11,822
    I think *manufacturing jobs* could be one. He's got a bee in his bonnet about that one

    DavidL said:

    OK, a fiver on 'Thatcher' at 12/1. The guy is fixated with the great lady, and I'm thinking he might come up with 'the biggest attack on workers since Mrs Thatcher' or some such tosh.

    Edit: 'Inequality' is a pretty good guess but 1/2 is a bit mean. Ditto 'Poverty'

    Mistake. Mentioning "Thatcher" allows Cameron to ask if the Shadow Chancellor would still want to assassinate her given the chance. Too easy a hit. He will avoid it.

    Inequality and poverty much better bets.
    inequality claims are pretty bogus too. So he is on weak ground so where you look. It's a bad 'proxy' for poverty - which we should worry about.
    'Globally, inequality has been falling for decades because poor countries such China and India have grown much, much more rapidly than the developed world. But within-country inequality in these countries is often rising, because it is the middle classes that benefit most from this growth. Even though poor people are still getting substantially richer in these places, anyone looking at equality statistics would conclude that things are getting worse. That's nonsense'
    http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/jeremy-corbyn-inequality-myth-sorry-labour-lefties-your-new-messiah-will-not-help-poor-1519216

    If I have a mobile phone for £50 and someone else one for £500 then where am I unequal? How many people are denied a mobile phone because of inequality?
  • AndyJSAndyJS Posts: 21,869
    Matthew Goodwin — "Jeremy Corbyn will struggle to win back Ukip voters"

    http://www.prospectmagazine.co.uk/politics/jeremy-corbyn-will-struggle-to-win-back-ukip-voters
  • taffystaffys Posts: 9,753
    ''I have the feeling that Mr Estobar was not very old when Mrs Thatcher was PM..He may not even been a twinkle in is daddy,s eye..''

    Even less old in the bankrupt, turbulent 1970s when Corbynites roamed the country and precipitated the winter of discontent.
  • TOPPINGTOPPING Posts: 12,733

    tyson said:

    I don't think they'll even dislike Corbyn to be honest. Disagree with is probably more fitting because I am convinced Corbyn will never stoop to playing the man which will make a refreshing change.

    I think alot of people will grow to like Corbyn- even some of our pbCOM loons. I don't think Corbyn's integrity and way of conducting himself will translate to votes, but it will earn him a great deal of cross party respect. Politics will become much more civilised with Corbyn around.

    DanSmith said:

    DavidL said:

    Interestingly gracious welcome from Javid this afternoon to Corbyn's first outing. My guess is that the Tories will feel no particular need to go for Corbyn's jugular and I expect Cameron to be on his best behaviour.

    The target of choice is going to be McConnell, partly because he is a series of words we are not supposed to use on this site, partly because so many in the Labour party itself clearly have reservations but ultimately because this appointment reflects more badly on Mr Corbyn's judgement than anything else he has done to date. The whole Alan Johnston episode did Ed a lot of damage and the Tories will be hoping to repeat it.

    On these words I agree with TSE. Shadsy is hoping to recoup some of his Corbyn losses. Avoid.

    It's easy to forget how much the Tories hated Miliband's two faced behaviour (for example the way he behaved over Syria). They will dislike Corbyn but respect him because what you see is what you get.
    I am sorry, Mr. Tyson, but your post so much reminded me of the Monty Python sketch about the Piranaha brothers. In which Dynsdale is described as a lovely bloke who sent his mum flowers and everything.

    As we are starting to see Corbyn is not really that nice, friendly chap who is always willing to debate ideas with anyone. What we see might be what we get but we ain't seen much so far and what little we have seen, when he is taken away from his comfort zone, doesn't bode well.
    I think this is the danger. He is now LotO so many people who aren't particularly paying attention (as @SeanT mentioned) who won't have been paying attention might think - ah what a decent cove...might not agree with him but at least he speaks his mind...new kind of politics...

    And all of a sudden the man who consorted and for all we know still consorts with the UK's enemies, with terrorists, with people who throw homosexuals off buildings, who want to destroy the Jews (and I don't think his Ministry will protect them) and who are deeply misogynist...becomes mainstream and it then becomes Jeremy just being Jeremy.

    And then you have @tyson telling us that in all his emails Jeremy has never had a bad word to say about anyone.
  • Estobar said:

    DavidL said:

    Estobar said:

    DavidL said:

    OK, a fiver on 'Thatcher' at 12/1. The guy is fixated with the great lady, and I'm thinking he might come up with 'the biggest attack on workers since Mrs Thatcher' or some such tosh.

    Edit: 'Inequality' is a pretty good guess but 1/2 is a bit mean. Ditto 'Poverty'

    Mistake. Mentioning "Thatcher" allows Cameron to ask if the Shadow Chancellor would still want to assassinate her given the chance. Too easy a hit. He will avoid it.

    Inequality and poverty much better bets.
    Despite the fact half the country or more would love to have done? (As hyperbole.)
    Yes, even if that were true, which it is not, we do not elect psychopathic lunatics (see, for example, Gordon Brown).
    More name calling
    Brown was called dysfunctional by Peter Watt, the Labour Party General Secretary.
  • Plato_SaysPlato_Says Posts: 11,822
    edited September 2015
    Did you vote at the GE2020 and who for, if so - the draw Jezza had from other parties is quite interesting.
    Estobar said:

    Do you do much except find people to hate? If so, perhaps a little less hyperbolic vitriol would be wise.

    BTW, I think you missed my question earlier - who did you vote for at the GE2020? And did you vote for Jezza as leader or just like him?

    Estobar said:

    After his ‘walk of silence’ Corbyn may end up saying nothing…


    There's a difference between PMQ's and ignoring one of Murdoch's tossers.
    I did miss it. Yes, I voted for Corbyn.

    I think you under-estimate how much dislike there is 'out there' for the MSM especially the Murdoch machine and right-wing rags. They have whipped up disgusting sentiment against 'migrants' and against Corbyn with totally unjustified personal attacks.
  • alex.alex. Posts: 2,814
    Does anyone know what Tom Watson's role is now? When was the last time a deputy leader didn't have a (shadow) ministerial job? Is he party chairman?
  • watford30watford30 Posts: 3,474
    Estobar said:

    Estobar said:

    DavidL said:

    OK, a fiver on 'Thatcher' at 12/1. The guy is fixated with the great lady, and I'm thinking he might come up with 'the biggest attack on workers since Mrs Thatcher' or some such tosh.

    Edit: 'Inequality' is a pretty good guess but 1/2 is a bit mean. Ditto 'Poverty'

    Mistake. Mentioning "Thatcher" allows Cameron to ask if the Shadow Chancellor would still want to assassinate her given the chance. Too easy a hit. He will avoid it.

    Inequality and poverty much better bets.
    Despite the fact half the country or more would love to have done? (As hyperbole.)
    Half the Country would love to have 'assassinated' her. Do you think before you spout such rubbish

    I do. Thatcher was the most divisive politician of the twentieth century by all measures. I can't really be bothered to give you a history lesson on it. Have a look at YouTube on the poll tax riots to remind yourself. That's not a comment on whether she was right or wrong. She was just incredible divisive and even now if you speak her name people a significant number of people will well up in a near-allergic reaction. Go to some parts of the country and try and deny this at your peril.
    Ah, the Poll Tax Riots.

    Thousands of Lefties and Soap Dodgers expecting special treatment, and objecting when they were expected to contribute towards the services they used.
  • EstobarEstobar Posts: 558

    I have the feeling that Mr Estobar was not very old when Mrs Thatcher was PM..He may not even been a twinkle in is daddy,s eye..

    What makes you think Mr Estobar is even male? Ciao for now.
  • Wes Streeting (Labour) has said trade unions should be allowed to use electronic balloting.

    Wes Streeting is so daft he should not be an MP.
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