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politicalbetting.com » Blog Archive » As the national polls show LAB’s plight getting worse party

SystemSystem Posts: 6,199
edited November 2015 in General

imagepoliticalbetting.com » Blog Archive » As the national polls show LAB’s plight getting worse party members remain very loyal to their new leader

The key points from tonight's Times YouGov poll of LAB members & leadership voters pic.twitter.com/2htYOGi2uA

Read the full story here


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Comments

  • Labour are fecked aren't they?
  • GeoffMGeoffM Posts: 6,071
    Second!
  • GeoffMGeoffM Posts: 6,071
    My £3 is turning out to be a fantastic investment.
  • Scott_PScott_P Posts: 37,244

    Labour are fecked aren't they?

    Only if they sit on their hands. Again.
  • US issues global travel alert for its citizens in response to "increased terrorist threats"
  • AndyJSAndyJS Posts: 22,432
    edited November 2015
    Labour members getting more and more out of touch with the average voter, and they don't seem to care about it, the Millwall FC syndrome.
  • I don't see how MPs can defy the will of party members when Jeremy Corbyn retains their support to that extent. Disaffected Labour MPs are going to need to, you know, talk with members and give them an alternative way forward.

    I know, revolutionary idea.
  • glwglw Posts: 4,316

    Labour are fecked aren't they?

    What Labour needs now is some sort of coup, that leads to a really divisive leadership election, and then Corbyn gets reelected.
  • Moses_Moses_ Posts: 4,865

    Labour are fecked aren't they?

    Yes They are. Shed no tears they have had it coming for years the damage they have inflicted . The most important thing now is to make sure they are never able to resurrect in present form. Finish them for good once and for all.

    A new Labour type Party is then required and not one of this bunch of wasters and hypocritical chancers should be a part of it.
  • I don't see how MPs can defy the will of party members when Jeremy Corbyn retains their support to that extent. Disaffected Labour MPs are going to need to, you know, talk with members and give them an alternative way forward.

    I know, revolutionary idea.

    The poll looks good for those who have backed McDonnell at 50/1 and 40/1 to be next Lab leader.
  • Scott_PScott_P Posts: 37,244

    I don't see how MPs can defy the will of party members when Jeremy Corbyn retains their support to that extent.

    Labour MPs were elected by 9m people on a non-Corbyn platform. His 140,000 followers can stick it...
  • GeoffM said:

    My £3 is turning out to be a fantastic investment.

    Yes it has. My investment turned out to be even better as I was able to vote and cancel the direct debit before it got cashed.
    Labour has turned into the most epic clusterf**k.
    Heart of stone etc.
  • chestnutchestnut Posts: 7,341
    Perhaps the PLP could engineer a reverse takeover of the Greens to mirror what the Corbynites have done with Labour.
  • Labour are fecked aren't they?

    I thought the Tories were c.1997-2003. I was wrong.

    In Labour's case, this really could be existential: the party could either just dissolve, or shrink into a rumpish cult, and permanent irrelevancy.

    And on that note, I bid you goodnight.
  • foxinsoxukfoxinsoxuk Posts: 23,548
    You really do wonder what it would take to convince the 86% of Corbyn voters that they are not correct.

    Perhaps if he bombed Syria himself?
  • I don't see how MPs can defy the will of party members when Jeremy Corbyn retains their support to that extent. Disaffected Labour MPs are going to need to, you know, talk with members and give them an alternative way forward.

    I know, revolutionary idea.

    The poll looks good for those who have backed McDonnell at 50/1 and 40/1 to be next Lab leader.
    That's true actually. If Corbyn quits, someone from the hard Left will stand with a good chance of winning.

    And McDonnell is the obvious choice.
  • I don't see a problem with automatic reselection. If the MP doesn't represent the party why should they represent the party? American politicians face automatic reselection in primaries all the time don't they?

    If the MPs don't think they have the support of the Labour Party then they should either retire, win support or form their own Party.
  • surbitonsurbiton Posts: 13,549
    Regarding bombing of Syria:

    1. I am in the 42% of GB population.

    2. I am in the 51% of Labour voters

    3. I am in the 70% of Labour members / supporters

    4. I did not vote for Corbyn.
  • Labour are fecked aren't they?

    Rattled.
  • SquareRootSquareRoot Posts: 5,575

    Labour are fecked aren't they?

    I thought the Tories were c.1997-2003. I was wrong.

    In Labour's case, this really could be existential: the party could either just dissolve, or shrink into a rumpish cult, and permanent irrelevancy.

    And on that note, I bid you goodnight.
    Unless the voting public has a complete head fuck, Labour are screwed in 2020, it matters not who is Tory leader Labour are TOTALLY UNELECTABLE with Corbyn as leader.. ask the man/woman in the street, bollocks to the polls, which are untested...just ASK.
  • MalmesburyMalmesbury Posts: 1,478

    Labour are fecked aren't they?

    Only if you think that being being the perfect political party for a junior lecturer in Social Studies at the University of Bums on Seats, with 25% of the national vote, is fecked.

    So yes, actually.
  • Danny565Danny565 Posts: 6,872

    I don't see how MPs can defy the will of party members when Jeremy Corbyn retains their support to that extent. Disaffected Labour MPs are going to need to, you know, talk with members and give them an alternative way forward.

    I know, revolutionary idea.

    Yup, but the PLP are continuing to shoot themselves in the foot by planning to vote for air strikes en masse just to "make a point", which will thus confirm even to mainstream members that the MPs are not on their side.
  • surbitonsurbiton Posts: 13,549

    I don't see a problem with automatic reselection. If the MP doesn't represent the party why should they represent the party? American politicians face automatic reselection in primaries all the time don't they?

    If the MPs don't think they have the support of the Labour Party then they should either retire, win support or form their own Party.

    US Congressmen/women [ HoR ] face primaries every two years. That's why the GOP has so many nutters because of the Tea Party.
  • glwglw Posts: 4,316

    Heart of stone etc.

    Speaking of stone, remember when the Ed Stone was one of the most ludicrous things Labour had done in years? Now it wouldn't even make this years top 10.
  • I don't see a problem with automatic reselection. If the MP doesn't represent the party why should they represent the party? American politicians face automatic reselection in primaries all the time don't they?

    If the MPs don't think they have the support of the Labour Party then they should either retire, win support or form their own Party.

    If they don't like where the party is going they should fight, fight and fight again to save the party they love. Right now they sulk, sulk and sulk again.
  • @SamCoatesTimes: YouGov: Some 29 per cent think the government should change on the economy, against 86 per cent of Labour members/supporters/affiliates
  • Scott_PScott_P Posts: 37,244

    someone from the hard Left will stand with a good chance of winning.

    And McDonnell is the obvious choice.

    That depends on how the election is fought.

    Against a backdrop of action in Syria and the ongoing terrorist threat in Europe, is a guy who praised the IRA really who you want in charge? As long as someone is prepared to take him on, no reason he has to win.

    It would be the bloodiest party leadership campaign, but might be Labour's only hope.
  • glwglw Posts: 4,316

    You really do wonder what it would take to convince the 86% of Corbyn voters that they are not correct.

    I hate to say this, as I hope it doesn't happen, but I've said before that I think it will be his response to a terrorist attack here that will be his undoing.
  • Danny565Danny565 Posts: 6,872

    @SamCoatesTimes: YouGov: Some 29 per cent think the government should change on the economy, against 86 per cent of Labour members/supporters/affiliates

    That seems like an odd question. I'm not sure how I'd answer it myself: I'd *like* them to change on the economy, but that doesn't mean I think they *should* since they sadly won an election on their economic platform just months ago.
  • surbitonsurbiton Posts: 13,549
    edited November 2015
    Scott_P said:

    I don't see how MPs can defy the will of party members when Jeremy Corbyn retains their support to that extent.

    Labour MPs were elected by 9m people on a non-Corbyn platform. His 140,000 followers can stick it...
    How many of them are going to face the same electorate ? Only if members let them or as independents .
  • surbiton said:

    I don't see a problem with automatic reselection. If the MP doesn't represent the party why should they represent the party? American politicians face automatic reselection in primaries all the time don't they?

    If the MPs don't think they have the support of the Labour Party then they should either retire, win support or form their own Party.

    US Congressmen/women [ HoR ] face primaries every two years. That's why the GOP has so many nutters because of the Tea Party.
    That's who is voting in the primaries. That forces others to either stand up or fight but the GOP representatives are representative of their voters at least. I don't see a harm in that.
  • Put it this way this has definitely ended the writer's block Mike and I have been suffering.
  • I don't see a problem with automatic reselection. If the MP doesn't represent the party why should they represent the party? American politicians face automatic reselection in primaries all the time don't they?

    If the MPs don't think they have the support of the Labour Party then they should either retire, win support or form their own Party.

    If they don't like where the party is going they should fight, fight and fight again to save the party they love. Right now they sulk, sulk and sulk again.
    Exactly! Simple moaning will do nothing. Put up or shut up.
  • surbitonsurbiton Posts: 13,549

    surbiton said:

    I don't see a problem with automatic reselection. If the MP doesn't represent the party why should they represent the party? American politicians face automatic reselection in primaries all the time don't they?

    If the MPs don't think they have the support of the Labour Party then they should either retire, win support or form their own Party.

    US Congressmen/women [ HoR ] face primaries every two years. That's why the GOP has so many nutters because of the Tea Party.
    That's who is voting in the primaries. That forces others to either stand up or fight but the GOP representatives are representative of their voters at least. I don't see a harm in that.
    True.
  • Scott_PScott_P Posts: 37,244
    surbiton said:

    How many of them are going to face the same electorate ? Only if members let them or as independents .

    If they do nothing, they get deselected. If they stand up and fight, there might be a party left to stand for.
  • @MSmithsonPB: Perhaps LAB's main hope now rests with the Tories making Osborne Cameron's successor
  • Scott_PScott_P Posts: 37,244
    @jonwalker121: This Ed guy looks pretty good? #newsnight
  • AnneJGPAnneJGP Posts: 2,225
    glw said:

    Heart of stone etc.

    Speaking of stone, remember when the Ed Stone was one of the most ludicrous things Labour had done in years? Now it wouldn't even make this years top 10.
    LOL *claps*
  • surbitonsurbiton Posts: 13,549
    Danny565 said:

    I don't see how MPs can defy the will of party members when Jeremy Corbyn retains their support to that extent. Disaffected Labour MPs are going to need to, you know, talk with members and give them an alternative way forward.

    I know, revolutionary idea.

    Yup, but the PLP are continuing to shoot themselves in the foot by planning to vote for air strikes en masse just to "make a point", which will thus confirm even to mainstream members that the MPs are not on their side.
    If I had a Labour MP and he/she voted for air strikes, I would personally organise the de-selection process.

    What will it actually achieve ?

    I read somewhere that Cameron has said privately that if we do not bomb Syria then the Gulf countries would lose faith in us.

    Meaning the very people who are actually financing Daesh ?
  • Danny565Danny565 Posts: 6,872
    edited November 2015
    Scott_P said:

    surbiton said:

    How many of them are going to face the same electorate ? Only if members let them or as independents .

    If they do nothing, they get deselected. If they stand up and fight, there might be a party left to stand for.
    But "stand up and fight" has to mean, as Mr Meeks says, offering an alternative which is at least vaguely acceptable to the average Labour member, even if jettisoning some of the hardcore Corbynite excesses.

    "Stand up and fight" cannot mean constantly moaning, gratuitously opposing absolutely everything Corbyn does, and providing the government with political cover and votes in Parliament to do things - and if that is what they're going to do, then I see no reason why Labour members should be obliged to continue blessing them with OUR subscription money and OUR canvassing efforts.
  • @MSmithsonPB: Perhaps LAB's main hope now rests with the Tories making Osborne Cameron's successor

    Labour need to rebuild with Karen Danzcuk as leader.
    She'd get my vote.

  • PulpstarPulpstar Posts: 45,077
    Danny565 said:

    I don't see how MPs can defy the will of party members when Jeremy Corbyn retains their support to that extent. Disaffected Labour MPs are going to need to, you know, talk with members and give them an alternative way forward.

    I know, revolutionary idea.

    Yup, but the PLP are continuing to shoot themselves in the foot by planning to vote for air strikes en masse just to "make a point", which will thus confirm even to mainstream members that the MPs are not on their side.
    Personally I'd be voting for air strikes now in parliament.

    But it wouldn't be to make a political point, it'd be because I'd believe it was the right thing to do. Anyone voting any way in this debate to make a point deserves everything they get.
  • MikeKMikeK Posts: 9,053
    Fabrication and falsehoods at US central command. Surely not:

  • But never mind that. What's this sex scandal that, according to the photo, is about to consume Grant Shapps? (I don't read the tabloids so I don't know.)
  • Scott_PScott_P Posts: 37,244
    Oh dear, trouble in the branch office...

    @AlanRoden: From today's Mail: SNP rift over Syria, police probe missing funds at Women for Indy, and new govt cronyism row. https://t.co/qhOd9FOSzf
  • surbitonsurbiton Posts: 13,549

    @MSmithsonPB: Perhaps LAB's main hope now rests with the Tories making Osborne Cameron's successor

    Labour need to rebuild with Karen Danzcuk as leader.
    She'd get my vote.

    I will give her one !
  • TomTom Posts: 273
    God we really are fucked. I've had a period of relief which comes when you've given up hope - a bit like watching west ham after they've been relegated. However back in deep despair now. I am in a party full of utterly mad people.
  • Danny565Danny565 Posts: 6,872
    edited November 2015
    Pulpstar said:

    Danny565 said:

    I don't see how MPs can defy the will of party members when Jeremy Corbyn retains their support to that extent. Disaffected Labour MPs are going to need to, you know, talk with members and give them an alternative way forward.

    I know, revolutionary idea.

    Yup, but the PLP are continuing to shoot themselves in the foot by planning to vote for air strikes en masse just to "make a point", which will thus confirm even to mainstream members that the MPs are not on their side.
    Personally I'd be voting for air strikes now in parliament.

    But it wouldn't be to make a political point, it'd be because I'd believe it was the right thing to do. Anyone voting any way in this debate to make a point deserves everything they get.
    I have sympathy with that view (personally, I'd prefer to wait until the West has got some idea of what they're going to do in the aftermath until they go in -- better to do the thing properly, rather than half-arsed now and leaving a vacuum afterwards with no idea of what to fill it, IMO), and I wouldn't blame any MP who sincerely feels air strikes will help the situation if they voted that way.

    But I'm suspicious of whether a lot of Labour MPs truly believe air strikes are the right thing in principle, or whether they're only planning to vote that way to embarrass Corbyn and get themselves kudos from the media.
  • glw said:

    Heart of stone etc.

    Speaking of stone, remember when the Ed Stone was one of the most ludicrous things Labour had done in years? Now it wouldn't even make this years top 10.
    Top 20.
    This period may well end up as a suitable topic on Pointless.
  • surbitonsurbiton Posts: 13,549
    http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-34906011

    Good news. Why did it take so ;long ? Was it not to upset the Saudis ?
  • surbiton said:

    http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-34906011

    Good news. Why did it take so ;long ? Was it not to upset the Saudis ?

    I bet that was some fireworks display
  • AnneJGPAnneJGP Posts: 2,225

    I don't see a problem with automatic reselection. If the MP doesn't represent the party why should they represent the party? American politicians face automatic reselection in primaries all the time don't they?

    If the MPs don't think they have the support of the Labour Party then they should either retire, win support or form their own Party.

    If they don't like where the party is going they should fight, fight and fight again to save the party they love. Right now they sulk, sulk and sulk again.
    I doubt they're really sulking. They simply have nothing to put up that will inspire others, and no sense of motivation to get them swimming against the tide. The brightest & best set out their stalls during the leadership election, and they were all lack-lustre. ISTR one chap described the best of the as "He'll do, I suppose".

    Mr Corbyn was at least different and had a positive anti-Conservative message.

    The problem with New Labour was that it was 'just' an election-winning machine. It was not so much disciplined as conditioned. After the movers & shakers went, the rest were left still waiting to be told what was wanted in the way of policies & lines to take and all that.

    All the motivation fell away when the star of the show left the stage.
  • http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3330337/Now-s-war-room-Inside-Russia-s-fortified-triple-decker-operations-base-Putin-masterminds-strikes-Syria.html

    Don't envy their job, having the big man watching from the stands. Make a mistake and you could end up strapped to one of those rockets.
  • foxinsoxukfoxinsoxuk Posts: 23,548
    surbiton said:

    @MSmithsonPB: Perhaps LAB's main hope now rests with the Tories making Osborne Cameron's successor

    Labour need to rebuild with Karen Danzcuk as leader.
    She'd get my vote.

    I will give her one !
    I'm in for £3
  • GeoffMGeoffM Posts: 6,071
    Tom said:

    I am in a party full of utterly mad people.

    Labour has *always* been full of utterly mad people.
    Only the number of frogs in the box varies over time.

  • TheScreamingEaglesTheScreamingEagles Posts: 66,840
    edited November 2015

    @MSmithsonPB: Perhaps LAB's main hope now rests with the Tories making Osborne Cameron's successor

    Labour need to rebuild with Karen Danzcuk as leader.
    She'd get my vote.

    I saw her in Selfridges a few weeks ago

    Calling her beautiful is like saying caviar is a good source of protein. It’s technically true, but insufficient to capture her unique, otherworldly perfection.
  • TomTom Posts: 273
    GeoffM said:

    Tom said:

    I am in a party full of utterly mad people.

    Labour has *always* been full of utterly mad people.
    Only the number of frogs in the box varies over time.

    All political parties are full of mad, eccentric and plain weird people. Look at the current Tory scandal, various lib dem bizarre events from dog shooting to corprophilia, and ukip generally. Usually though they collectively have some insight into what the punters believe. I don't think I've ever seen such a disconnection between a party, the voters and reality as we are currently witnessing. This is not a left/right thing - corbyn is plainly neither up to the job or electable.
  • ReggieCideReggieCide Posts: 2,663
    surbiton said:

    @MSmithsonPB: Perhaps LAB's main hope now rests with the Tories making Osborne Cameron's successor

    Labour need to rebuild with Karen Danzcuk as leader.
    She'd get my vote.

    I will give her one !
    Can you spare it?
  • MikeLMikeL Posts: 4,552
    Everyone says Lab won't ditch Corbyn and of course it looks that way. But is it inevitable?

    He got just under 60%. That means only 1 in 6 people has to desert him to take him under 50%.

    Suppose:

    1) He faces a single, much more effective challenger than Burnham / Cooper

    2) The contest is on the back of disastrous May 2016 election results

    Is it really inconceivable that the momentum behind him might change?
  • glwglw Posts: 4,316
    edited November 2015
    Tom said:

    I don't think I've ever seen such a disconnection between a party, the voters and reality as we are currently witnessing. This is not a left/right thing - corbyn is plainly neither up to the job or electable.

    I can see it, you can see it, the public can see it, but Labour members are saying something like "Only the true Messiah denies His divinity!"
  • PongPong Posts: 4,693
    Looks like Michael Green is being lined up for the firing squad by CCHQ.
  • TomTom Posts: 273
    I think the yougov total 'members' includes the 3 quidders and the unions so actual member support for Corbyn will be a bit lower.
  • Scott_PScott_P Posts: 37,244
    Tom said:

    I think the yougov total 'members' includes the 3 quidders and the unions so actual member support for Corbyn will be a bit lower.

    Exactly. The follow on to "80% of Corbyn voters" must be "how many of them are Tories?"
  • ReggieCideReggieCide Posts: 2,663
    Where does Uncle Len sit on all this?
  • Scott_PScott_P Posts: 37,244
    @johnmcdonnellMP: Yougov: 66% of party members think Jeremy is doing well & 86% of ppl who voted for him think he is doing well. We will take fight to Tories

    @DPJHodges: Labour leadership now tweeting poll results showing Labour members think they're doing a good job. Genuinely. It's come to this.
  • flightpath01flightpath01 Posts: 4,903
    edited November 2015

    @MSmithsonPB: Perhaps LAB's main hope now rests with the Tories making Osborne Cameron's successor

    Labour need to rebuild with Karen Danzcuk as leader.
    She'd get my vote.

    I saw her in Selfridges a few weeks ago

    Calling her beautiful is like saying caviar is a good source of protein. It’s technically true, but insufficient to capture her unique, otherworldly perfection.
    Were you intending to walk into specsavers?
  • viewcodeviewcode Posts: 5,218

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3330337/Now-s-war-room-Inside-Russia-s-fortified-triple-decker-operations-base-Putin-masterminds-strikes-Syria.html

    Don't envy their job, having the big man watching from the stands. Make a mistake and you could end up strapped to one of those rockets.

    I know the Russians are bad guys with expansionist attitudes and careless about killing civilians, national boundaries and the whole good/evil thing, but...fuck, that's impressive. Neat color scheme. Can we have one?
  • TomTom Posts: 273

    Where does Uncle Len sit on all this?

    Ask tom Watson.
  • Tim_BTim_B Posts: 7,078
    According to CNN, Der Spiegel is reporting that a third Paris attacker entered Europe as a refugee.

    Also, a discarded suicide vest found in a trash can in the Paris suburb of Montrouge, where the missing terrorist's cell phone placed him after the attack.
  • Tom said:

    Where does Uncle Len sit on all this?

    Ask tom Watson.
    Where's Tom?
  • @MSmithsonPB: Perhaps LAB's main hope now rests with the Tories making Osborne Cameron's successor

    Labour need to rebuild with Karen Danzcuk as leader.
    She'd get my vote.

    I saw her in Selfridges a few weeks ago

    Calling her beautiful is like saying caviar is a good source of protein. It’s technically true, but insufficient to capture her unique, otherworldly perfection.
    And you didn't get a selfie with her?
    Never tried caviar myself, but I'll take your analogy.
  • Danny565Danny565 Posts: 6,872
    edited November 2015
    MikeL said:

    Everyone says Lab won't ditch Corbyn and of course it looks that way. But is it inevitable?

    He got just under 60%. That means only 1 in 6 people has to desert him to take him under 50%.

    Suppose:

    1) He faces a single, much more effective challenger than Burnham / Cooper

    2) The contest is on the back of disastrous May 2016 election results

    Is it really inconceivable that the momentum behind him might change?

    It would need both of those, AND 3) the PLP meeting the grassroots halfway and offering them something vaguely left-leaning (i.e. not offering austerity, meaningless platitudes and abstentions on welfare cuts, like we got from them in the summer).

    I for one would be more than happy to support a change in such circumstances.
  • Moses_Moses_ Posts: 4,865
    Scott_P said:

    @johnmcdonnellMP: Yougov: 66% of party members think Jeremy is doing well & 86% of ppl who voted for him think he is doing well. We will take fight to Tories

    @DPJHodges: Labour leadership now tweeting poll results showing Labour members think they're doing a good job. Genuinely. It's come to this.

    Just wondering where he was this afternoon during the monstering of his leader when we saw the empty opposition benches. Interesting way to take the " fight to the Tories".
  • @MSmithsonPB: Perhaps LAB's main hope now rests with the Tories making Osborne Cameron's successor

    Labour need to rebuild with Karen Danzcuk as leader.
    She'd get my vote.

    I saw her in Selfridges a few weeks ago

    Calling her beautiful is like saying caviar is a good source of protein. It’s technically true, but insufficient to capture her unique, otherworldly perfection.
    And you didn't get a selfie with her?
    Never tried caviar myself, but I'll take your analogy.
    Caviar is fab. Has to be eaten at the right temperature.

    Re the selfie, my girlfriend was nearby
  • viewcode said:

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3330337/Now-s-war-room-Inside-Russia-s-fortified-triple-decker-operations-base-Putin-masterminds-strikes-Syria.html

    Don't envy their job, having the big man watching from the stands. Make a mistake and you could end up strapped to one of those rockets.

    I know the Russians are bad guys with expansionist attitudes and careless about killing civilians, national boundaries and the whole good/evil thing, but...fuck, that's impressive. Neat color scheme. Can we have one?
    Is it built inside an extinct volcano? Those blue jumpsuits look familiar and I think I saw a furry white cat.

    But something like this, the all seeing eye, the constant observation by satellite, drone and spy plane is what we need and may have perhaps. Plus complete with the communications direct to our special forces on the ground.
    Equally of course we do have lots of clever things going on deep in the bowels of GCHQ
  • TomTom Posts: 273

    Tom said:

    Where does Uncle Len sit on all this?

    Ask tom Watson.
    Where's Tom?
    Keeping his powder dry somewhere. Not being loudly supportive of the leader though.
  • Moses_Moses_ Posts: 4,865

    Where does Uncle Len sit on all this?

    That is really a $64,000 question. The one thing we do know is he has been very quiet for quite a while not a peep. I said the other day that the Unions know the way to power is by elections of MPs. Obvious perhaps but the PLP and the members seem not to care about that.

    The money being inserted and considering up to a 1/3 of the PLP is unison sponsored at,least before the election anyway means Len will not be quiet for long. It will then get very very messy.
  • NickPalmerNickPalmer Posts: 10,601

    I don't see a problem with automatic reselection. If the MP doesn't represent the party why should they represent the party? American politicians face automatic reselection in primaries all the time don't they?

    If the MPs don't think they have the support of the Labour Party then they should either retire, win support or form their own Party.

    I've got a PB article on the dilemmas for MPs and members in the pipeline for the next day or two.
  • Tom said:

    Tom said:

    Where does Uncle Len sit on all this?

    Ask tom Watson.
    Where's Tom?
    Keeping his powder dry somewhere. Not being loudly supportive of the leader though.
    Not in the TV studios then.
  • AnneJGPAnneJGP Posts: 2,225

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3330337/Now-s-war-room-Inside-Russia-s-fortified-triple-decker-operations-base-Putin-masterminds-strikes-Syria.html

    Don't envy their job, having the big man watching from the stands. Make a mistake and you could end up strapped to one of those rockets.

    Looks like a fairly heavily male-dominated environment!
  • ReggieCideReggieCide Posts: 2,663
    viewcode said:

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3330337/Now-s-war-room-Inside-Russia-s-fortified-triple-decker-operations-base-Putin-masterminds-strikes-Syria.html

    Don't envy their job, having the big man watching from the stands. Make a mistake and you could end up strapped to one of those rockets.

    I know the Russians are bad guys with expansionist attitudes and careless about killing civilians, national boundaries and the whole good/evil thing, but...fuck, that's impressive. Neat color scheme. Can we have one?
    Putin must be loving this. All those shits in the west were sneering at him, now they're on their knees after his boots.
  • AnneJGP said:

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3330337/Now-s-war-room-Inside-Russia-s-fortified-triple-decker-operations-base-Putin-masterminds-strikes-Syria.html

    Don't envy their job, having the big man watching from the stands. Make a mistake and you could end up strapped to one of those rockets.

    Looks like a fairly heavily male-dominated environment!
    I don't think Vlad is much into diversity targets...
  • viewcode said:

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3330337/Now-s-war-room-Inside-Russia-s-fortified-triple-decker-operations-base-Putin-masterminds-strikes-Syria.html

    Don't envy their job, having the big man watching from the stands. Make a mistake and you could end up strapped to one of those rockets.

    I know the Russians are bad guys with expansionist attitudes and careless about killing civilians, national boundaries and the whole good/evil thing, but...fuck, that's impressive. Neat color scheme. Can we have one?
    Putin must be loving this. All those shits in the west were sneering at him, now they're on their knees after his boots.
    As long as he forgets the airliner crash.
  • ReggieCideReggieCide Posts: 2,663
    Tom said:

    Where does Uncle Len sit on all this?

    Ask tom Watson.
    That seems too simple. I know he's slippery but Uncle Len might prefer it soap induced rather than oil.
  • ReggieCideReggieCide Posts: 2,663
    edited November 2015
    Moses_ said:

    Scott_P said:

    @johnmcdonnellMP: Yougov: 66% of party members think Jeremy is doing well & 86% of ppl who voted for him think he is doing well. We will take fight to Tories

    @DPJHodges: Labour leadership now tweeting poll results showing Labour members think they're doing a good job. Genuinely. It's come to this.

    Just wondering where he was this afternoon during the monstering of his leader when we saw the empty opposition benches. Interesting way to take the " fight to the Tories".
    Has anyone heard a Corbynista using a cricketing analogy? Should we ask Norman?
  • Scott_PScott_P Posts: 37,244
    @BBCNormanS: Am told up to 20 labour MPs cd defy Corbyn over @thesnp Trident vote tomorrow


  • can i join the Milifandans?

    should have had this on the stone. then when they had an answer they could have made some gravel using a surgical air strike
  • TomTom Posts: 273

    Tom said:

    Where does Uncle Len sit on all this?

    Ask tom Watson.
    That seems too simple. I know he's slippery but Uncle Len might prefer it soap induced rather than oil.
    Ex-flat mates. Also note that Big Len supported Burnham, not Corbyn.
  • ReggieCideReggieCide Posts: 2,663

    viewcode said:

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3330337/Now-s-war-room-Inside-Russia-s-fortified-triple-decker-operations-base-Putin-masterminds-strikes-Syria.html

    Don't envy their job, having the big man watching from the stands. Make a mistake and you could end up strapped to one of those rockets.

    I know the Russians are bad guys with expansionist attitudes and careless about killing civilians, national boundaries and the whole good/evil thing, but...fuck, that's impressive. Neat color scheme. Can we have one?
    Putin must be loving this. All those shits in the west were sneering at him, now they're on their knees after his boots.
    As long as he forgets the airliner crash.
    He won't do that, that's his get out of jail card if anything goes wrong.
  • HYUFDHYUFD Posts: 42,748
    edited November 2015
    He has lost 2% though if 57% think he should take Labour into the election, as he won 59%. However he is not going to be ousted yet, it will take at least two years, that was the timeframe the Tories took to oust IDS after he was elected with 60% of Tory members' votes
  • Tom said:

    Tom said:

    Where does Uncle Len sit on all this?

    Ask tom Watson.
    That seems too simple. I know he's slippery but Uncle Len might prefer it soap induced rather than oil.
    Ex-flat mates. Also note that Big Len supported Burnham, not Corbyn.
    maybe D.Miliband is already boarding a sealed train in Switzerland
  • TomTom Posts: 273

    Tom said:

    Tom said:

    Where does Uncle Len sit on all this?

    Ask tom Watson.
    That seems too simple. I know he's slippery but Uncle Len might prefer it soap induced rather than oil.
    Ex-flat mates. Also note that Big Len supported Burnham, not Corbyn.
    maybe D.Miliband is already boarding a sealed train in Switzerland
    Sadly not much better at politics than Corbyn!
  • ReggieCideReggieCide Posts: 2,663
    edited November 2015
    Tom said:

    Tom said:

    Where does Uncle Len sit on all this?

    Ask tom Watson.
    That seems too simple. I know he's slippery but Uncle Len might prefer it soap induced rather than oil.
    Ex-flat mates. Also note that Big Len supported Burnham, not Corbyn.
    Oh I, and I'm sure most others, know. Are you suggesting that being flat mates explains the soapy preference?
  • Tom said:

    Tom said:

    Tom said:

    Where does Uncle Len sit on all this?

    Ask tom Watson.
    That seems too simple. I know he's slippery but Uncle Len might prefer it soap induced rather than oil.
    Ex-flat mates. Also note that Big Len supported Burnham, not Corbyn.
    maybe D.Miliband is already boarding a sealed train in Switzerland
    Sadly not much better at politics than Corbyn!
    more expensive suits, and that's what counts for the media, in the main
  • viewcodeviewcode Posts: 5,218

    viewcode said:

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3330337/Now-s-war-room-Inside-Russia-s-fortified-triple-decker-operations-base-Putin-masterminds-strikes-Syria.html

    Don't envy their job, having the big man watching from the stands. Make a mistake and you could end up strapped to one of those rockets.

    I know the Russians are bad guys with expansionist attitudes and careless about killing civilians, national boundaries and the whole good/evil thing, but...fuck, that's impressive. Neat color scheme. Can we have one?
    Is it built inside an extinct volcano? Those blue jumpsuits look familiar and I think I saw a furry white cat.

    But something like this, the all seeing eye, the constant observation by satellite, drone and spy plane is what we need and may have perhaps. Plus complete with the communications direct to our special forces on the ground.
    Equally of course we do have lots of clever things going on deep in the bowels of GCHQ
    I love Big Control Rooms With Big Screens, whether in fact or in fiction. But I genuinely don't know if UK command-and-control works like that: for all I know it might be three people in a room talking to a speakerphone.
  • HYUFDHYUFD Posts: 42,748
    % in favour of Syria strikes
    58% of public
    30% of Labour members/supporters
    16% of those who voted for Corbyn
    https://twitter.com/SamCoatesTimes?lang=en-gb
This discussion has been closed.