Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

politicalbetting.com » Blog Archive » The Sun once again leading the pack reporting negative develop

SystemSystem Posts: 5,841
edited February 1 in General

imagepoliticalbetting.com » Blog Archive » The Sun once again leading the pack reporting negative developments on TMay’s future

The Sun's Trevor Newton Dunn reporting a potential dramatic development that would be a nail in the coffin for the beleaguered TMayhttps://t.co/QJKMDDS3Ox pic.twitter.com/6th5JbAIOe

Read the full story here


«1345

Comments

  • swing_voterswing_voter Posts: 314
    First, like Tom Newton Dunn...........what is in it for the Sun? Are they pushing a BJ agenda?
  • RobDRobD Posts: 32,268

    First, like Tom Newton Dunn...........what is in it for the Sun? Are they pushing a BJ agenda?

    Please no...
  • SandpitSandpit Posts: 17,709
    So a junior minister is upset at not getting a recent promotion. Okay.
  • DecrepitJohnLDecrepitJohnL Posts: 8,026
    OT Jeffrey Archer is selling political cartoons at Sotheby's in March
    http://www.sothebys.com/en/auctions/2018/jeffrey-archer-l18417.html

    The Political Cartoon Collection of Jeffrey Archer, assembled over three decades, ranges over two hundred years of this satirical art form with subjects from Churchill to Thatcher, Lloyd George to Blair and Eisenhower to Kennedy. Significant artists include Gillray, Rowlandson, Tenniel, Beerbohm, Shepard, Low, Scarfe and Searle. Prices range from £20,000 to £200.

    No catalogue yet. The sale clashes with day two of Cheltenham.
  • OldKingColeOldKingCole Posts: 11,047

    OT Jeffrey Archer is selling political cartoons at Sotheby's in March
    http://www.sothebys.com/en/auctions/2018/jeffrey-archer-l18417.html

    The Political Cartoon Collection of Jeffrey Archer, assembled over three decades, ranges over two hundred years of this satirical art form with subjects from Churchill to Thatcher, Lloyd George to Blair and Eisenhower to Kennedy. Significant artists include Gillray, Rowlandson, Tenniel, Beerbohm, Shepard, Low, Scarfe and Searle. Prices range from £20,000 to £200.

    No catalogue yet. The sale clashes with day two of Cheltenham.

    Book sales falling?
  • CharlesCharles Posts: 19,441

    OT Jeffrey Archer is selling political cartoons at Sotheby's in March
    http://www.sothebys.com/en/auctions/2018/jeffrey-archer-l18417.html

    The Political Cartoon Collection of Jeffrey Archer, assembled over three decades, ranges over two hundred years of this satirical art form with subjects from Churchill to Thatcher, Lloyd George to Blair and Eisenhower to Kennedy. Significant artists include Gillray, Rowlandson, Tenniel, Beerbohm, Shepard, Low, Scarfe and Searle. Prices range from £20,000 to £200.

    No catalogue yet. The sale clashes with day two of Cheltenham.

    Book sales falling?
    Sunday Times pegged him at £120m in 2011, so doubt that's his issue.

    More likely his kids don't want it so he is cleaning house.
  • CarlottaVanceCarlottaVance Posts: 28,345
    Sandpit said:

    So a junior minister is upset at not getting a recent promotion. Okay.

    An older Junior Minister. The Sun does seem to have the inside track - though I note it was “grid girls” that made their front page.....
  • CharlesCharles Posts: 19,441

    Sandpit said:

    So a junior minister is upset at not getting a recent promotion. Okay.

    An older Junior Minister. The Sun does seem to have the inside track - though I note it was “grid girls” that made their front page.....
    Someone who thinks their career has peaked? Does that make them 2005 vintage or pre-2005?
  • CarlottaVanceCarlottaVance Posts: 28,345
    Charles said:

    Sandpit said:

    So a junior minister is upset at not getting a recent promotion. Okay.

    An older Junior Minister. The Sun does seem to have the inside track - though I note it was “grid girls” that made their front page.....
    Someone who thinks their career has peaked? Does that make them 2005 vintage or pre-2005?
    Certainly someone with an inflated sense of their own importance.....which does not narrow the field much....
  • CharlesCharles Posts: 19,441

    Charles said:

    Sandpit said:

    So a junior minister is upset at not getting a recent promotion. Okay.

    An older Junior Minister. The Sun does seem to have the inside track - though I note it was “grid girls” that made their front page.....
    Someone who thinks their career has peaked? Does that make them 2005 vintage or pre-2005?
    Certainly someone with an inflated sense of their own importance.....which does not narrow the field much....
    Although the Sun article was very very thin - largely Parris plus a Tory grandee rambling generally. Could easily be a malicious rumour
  • SandpitSandpit Posts: 17,709

    Charles said:

    Sandpit said:

    So a junior minister is upset at not getting a recent promotion. Okay.

    An older Junior Minister. The Sun does seem to have the inside track - though I note it was “grid girls” that made their front page.....
    Someone who thinks their career has peaked? Does that make them 2005 vintage or pre-2005?
    Certainly someone with an inflated sense of their own importance.....which does not narrow the field much....
    Someone who thinks it's now or never, because if Mrs May is still there in 2020 she'll be handing over to someone in their 40s.
  • IanB2IanB2 Posts: 9,827

    Charles said:

    Sandpit said:

    So a junior minister is upset at not getting a recent promotion. Okay.

    An older Junior Minister. The Sun does seem to have the inside track - though I note it was “grid girls” that made their front page.....
    Someone who thinks their career has peaked? Does that make them 2005 vintage or pre-2005?
    Certainly someone with an inflated sense of their own importance.....which does not narrow the field much....
    The reference to being older suggests that the unhappy Minister isn't personally affected by the next generation not being promoted.

    It would be amusing if it were Boris's brother, but more likely candidates are someone like Harrington on the Remain side, where most of the older ones are. I considered Field but he has done media appearances recently and doesn't seem discontented. Or perhaps Jesse Norman, who is independently minded with some form.
  • DecrepitJohnLDecrepitJohnL Posts: 8,026
    Sandpit said:

    Charles said:

    Sandpit said:

    So a junior minister is upset at not getting a recent promotion. Okay.

    An older Junior Minister. The Sun does seem to have the inside track - though I note it was “grid girls” that made their front page.....
    Someone who thinks their career has peaked? Does that make them 2005 vintage or pre-2005?
    Certainly someone with an inflated sense of their own importance.....which does not narrow the field much....
    Someone who thinks it's now or never, because if Mrs May is still there in 2020 she'll be handing over to someone in their 40s.
    It is less than two years since a 60-year-old took up the position, and the Labour and LibDem leaders are even older. More importantly, if the Cabinet remains largely static then the senior ministers will all be past their 40s.
  • RecidivistRecidivist Posts: 1,840
    Interesting that the Sun is no longer as pervasive in my life as it used to be. The time was when every front page would pass my eyeballs at some time in the day. People just don't read newspapers at tea breaks any more. It must be at least partially losing its ability to drive the agenda.
  • SandpitSandpit Posts: 17,709
    Taking a leaf out of the "If something's too controversial then ask the people" school of thought, Ireland are to hold another referendum on abortion in May. If we thought Brexit was a subject with deeply held beliefs on both sides...

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/women/politics/ireland-hold-historic-referendum-vote-abortion-laws/
  • DecrepitJohnLDecrepitJohnL Posts: 8,026
    If anyone has yesterday's Standard, there was a guide to the principal leadership contenders with, more interestingly, their allies and enemies. It does not seem to be online, and I left my copy in the fish and chip shop.
  • alex.alex. Posts: 2,814
    Is it Lord Falconer?
  • SandpitSandpit Posts: 17,709

    Sandpit said:

    So a junior minister is upset at not getting a recent promotion. Okay.

    An older Junior Minister. The Sun does seem to have the inside track - though I note it was “grid girls” that made their front page.....
    In today's least shocking news, it appears that the Sun are fans of glamour models.
  • alex.alex. Posts: 2,814
    Had a look at the list of Govt ministers on wiki. Most of them I haven’t heard of on anything other than a passing basis - the only one I can see who woul “fit the bill” is Alan Duncan.
  • Casino_RoyaleCasino_Royale Posts: 23,992
    Something in my gut tells me we could be very close, but I think it'd take a big beast of cabinet rank to trigger something (and probably not Hammond) and a junior minister (the headline says senior, but he quite clearly isn't) won't quite do it.
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 9,879

    Interesting that the Sun is no longer as pervasive in my life as it used to be. The time was when every front page would pass my eyeballs at some time in the day. People just don't read newspapers at tea breaks any more. It must be at least partially losing its ability to drive the agenda.

    How do you know they're not reading it on their phones?
  • Casino_RoyaleCasino_Royale Posts: 23,992

    First, like Tom Newton Dunn...........what is in it for the Sun? Are they pushing a BJ agenda?

    He's quite anti-Brexit, so I doubt it.

    Then again, he's quite anti-May.
  • SandpitSandpit Posts: 17,709

    Something in my gut tells me we could be very close, but I think it'd take a big beast of cabinet rank to trigger something (and probably not Hammond) and a junior minister (the headline says senior, but he quite clearly isn't) won't quite do it.

    If Cabinet ministers start resigning and publically writing letters to Graham Brady then yes, maybe things will come to a head and we'll get a confidence vote. But some junior minister upset at missing out on a reshuffle promotion, nah.
  • IanB2IanB2 Posts: 9,827
    Sandpit said:

    Something in my gut tells me we could be very close, but I think it'd take a big beast of cabinet rank to trigger something (and probably not Hammond) and a junior minister (the headline says senior, but he quite clearly isn't) won't quite do it.

    If Cabinet ministers start resigning and publically writing letters to Graham Brady then yes, maybe things will come to a head and we'll get a confidence vote. But some junior minister upset at missing out on a reshuffle promotion, nah.
    The lead says it isn't a Cabinet member, so I assume "senior" refers to his age/service
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 9,879
    Politics officially jumps the shark.

    Labour Uncut agrees with Paul Staines' analysis of Corbyn's statements on Iran:

    http://labour-uncut.co.uk/2018/01/31/breaking-labour-leader-leaves-national-television-interview-with-pants-on-fire/
  • RecidivistRecidivist Posts: 1,840
    ydoethur said:

    Interesting that the Sun is no longer as pervasive in my life as it used to be. The time was when every front page would pass my eyeballs at some time in the day. People just don't read newspapers at tea breaks any more. It must be at least partially losing its ability to drive the agenda.

    How do you know they're not reading it on their phones?
    I don't, but I don't see the headlines if they do.
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 9,879
    edited February 1

    ydoethur said:

    Interesting that the Sun is no longer as pervasive in my life as it used to be. The time was when every front page would pass my eyeballs at some time in the day. People just don't read newspapers at tea breaks any more. It must be at least partially losing its ability to drive the agenda.

    How do you know they're not reading it on their phones?
    I don't, but I don't see the headlines if they do.
    That's true, but that has little or nothing to do with their influence. More people probably read the Mail and Sun now than did when they had to pay for it. Moreover now they don't have to hide or make excuses for the Sun if nobody can see they're reading it.
  • SandpitSandpit Posts: 17,709
    edited February 1
    IanB2 said:

    Sandpit said:

    Something in my gut tells me we could be very close, but I think it'd take a big beast of cabinet rank to trigger something (and probably not Hammond) and a junior minister (the headline says senior, but he quite clearly isn't) won't quite do it.

    If Cabinet ministers start resigning and publically writing letters to Graham Brady then yes, maybe things will come to a head and we'll get a confidence vote. But some junior minister upset at missing out on a reshuffle promotion, nah.
    The lead says it isn't a Cabinet member, so I assume "senior" refers to his age/service
    Indeed, so the headline is disingenuous - there's no senior minister about to resign, only an old one.
  • SandpitSandpit Posts: 17,709
    edited February 1
    Breaking: Train crash in Virginia, hit dumpster on the line. Train was carrying several US Congressmen including Speaker Ryan en route to a Republican policy retreat.
    Fatalities mentioned but not among the politicians.
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2018/01/31/train-carrying-republican-members-congress-including-house/
    Edit: Was a few hours ago now, one fatality in the truck.
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 30,388
    Sandpit said:

    IanB2 said:

    Sandpit said:

    Something in my gut tells me we could be very close, but I think it'd take a big beast of cabinet rank to trigger something (and probably not Hammond) and a junior minister (the headline says senior, but he quite clearly isn't) won't quite do it.

    If Cabinet ministers start resigning and publically writing letters to Graham Brady then yes, maybe things will come to a head and we'll get a confidence vote. But some junior minister upset at missing out on a reshuffle promotion, nah.
    The lead says it isn't a Cabinet member, so I assume "senior" refers to his age/service
    Indeed, so the headline is disingenuous - there's no senior minister about to resign, only an old one.
    All politicians become 'senior' or 'key' or 'influential' when quoted for stories. If they were outright a newbie then papers would probably go with 'rising star' with the other descriptors unavailable
  • DavidLDavidL Posts: 19,880
    Sandpit said:

    So a junior minister is upset at not getting a recent promotion. Okay.

    No, no, no. It's a matter of principle, you understand.

  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 9,879
    DavidL said:

    Sandpit said:

    So a junior minister is upset at not getting a recent promotion. Okay.

    No, no, no. It's a matter of principle, you understand.

    It's an irregular verb. I have principles, you are prejudiced, he is disgruntled about lack of promotion.
  • AlastairMeeksAlastairMeeks Posts: 19,538
    Disappointed ministers don’t usually resign and call for a new direction. Just a thought for those pb Tories preparing a character assassination on the unknown politician.
  • DavidLDavidL Posts: 19,880
    kle4 said:

    Sandpit said:

    IanB2 said:

    Sandpit said:

    Something in my gut tells me we could be very close, but I think it'd take a big beast of cabinet rank to trigger something (and probably not Hammond) and a junior minister (the headline says senior, but he quite clearly isn't) won't quite do it.

    If Cabinet ministers start resigning and publically writing letters to Graham Brady then yes, maybe things will come to a head and we'll get a confidence vote. But some junior minister upset at missing out on a reshuffle promotion, nah.
    The lead says it isn't a Cabinet member, so I assume "senior" refers to his age/service
    Indeed, so the headline is disingenuous - there's no senior minister about to resign, only an old one.
    All politicians become 'senior' or 'key' or 'influential' when quoted for stories. If they were outright a newbie then papers would probably go with 'rising star' with the other descriptors unavailable
    It's a standing joke in Parliament House. The only way any of us can aspire to being a "top" lawyer is to get caught doing something we shouldn't.
  • rottenboroughrottenborough Posts: 14,489
    Have we ever had a situation where so many MPs in both major parties don't want their current leader? Vast swathes of the Labour benches would rather be rid of Jezza and vast swathes of the other bench want rid of May.

    Incredible.
  • SquareRootSquareRoot Posts: 5,492
    So that's one "bastard" at least...
  • SquareRootSquareRoot Posts: 5,492

    Disappointed ministers don’t usually resign and call for a new direction. Just a thought for those pb Tories preparing a character assassination on the unknown politician.

    Heseltine...
  • DavidLDavidL Posts: 19,880
    ydoethur said:

    Politics officially jumps the shark.

    Labour Uncut agrees with Paul Staines' analysis of Corbyn's statements on Iran:

    http://labour-uncut.co.uk/2018/01/31/breaking-labour-leader-leaves-national-television-interview-with-pants-on-fire/

    It's downright depressing how little attention that story is going to get. The author is right that UK politics has been devalued by blatant lies and a reluctance to call people out on them. Corbyn is indeed a disgrace and his anti western diatribes resulted in him supporting scum around the world. Mere stupidity is no excuse and Labour should be ashamed.
  • not_on_firenot_on_fire Posts: 2,184
    Sandpit said:

    Breaking: Train crash in Virginia, hit dumpster on the line. Train was carrying several US Congressmen including Speaker Ryan en route to a Republican policy retreat.
    Fatalities mentioned but not among the politicians.
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2018/01/31/train-carrying-republican-members-congress-including-house/
    Edit: Was a few hours ago now, one fatality in the truck.

    Train travel in the US is unacceptably dangerous. For all its faults, our railway industry does a fantastic job on safety.
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 9,879
    edited February 1

    Have we ever had a situation where so many MPs in both major parties don't want their current leader? Vast swathes of the Labour benches would rather be rid of Jezza and vast swathes of the other bench want rid of May.

    Incredible.

    Could we arrange a swap? Theresa May stood on a similar platform to Ed Miliband so should be acceptable to Labour centrists, plus she is the only person active in politics to deny the Conservatives an overall majority.

    Similarly Jeremy Corbyn with his Euroscepticism, penchant for sucking up to foreign dictatorships to get money and goods out of them and cavalier approach to campaigning would surely be acceptable to the Tory hard right. And if not, well, unlike Labour's Byzantine rules on elections the Conservatives have a simple mechanism for getting rid of him.

    And if neither quite worked out as expected it would at least be hilarious to watch.
  • alex.alex. Posts: 2,814
    If a 'senior minister' was that concerned about the failure to promote "young talent" from the backbenches, they could of course have made it a bit easier at the time of the reshuffle by making it clear that they didn't wish to continue themselves on the frontbench. Set an example and all that...
  • alex.alex. Posts: 2,814

    Disappointed ministers don’t usually resign and call for a new direction. Just a thought for those pb Tories preparing a character assassination on the unknown politician.

    What do disappointed ministers usually do when they resign?
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 9,879
    alex. said:

    Disappointed ministers don’t usually resign and call for a new direction. Just a thought for those pb Tories preparing a character assassination on the unknown politician.

    What do disappointed ministers usually do when they resign?
    Byers' and Mitchell's subsequent careers offer some pointers. And not in a good way.
  • DavidLDavidL Posts: 19,880
    alex. said:

    If a 'senior minister' was that concerned about the failure to promote "young talent" from the backbenches, they could of course have made it a bit easier at the time of the reshuffle by making it clear that they didn't wish to continue themselves on the frontbench. Set an example and all that...

    Whilst this is true there is likely to be some despair that no-hopers such as Leadsom, Grayling and Fox were left in position in the reshuffle. That despair does not of course properly take account of how little room for manoeuvre May had and indeed any successor would have in a minority government.
  • RecidivistRecidivist Posts: 1,840

    Have we ever had a situation where so many MPs in both major parties don't want their current leader? Vast swathes of the Labour benches would rather be rid of Jezza and vast swathes of the other bench want rid of May.

    Incredible.

    Truly. In fact I have a feeling that the pre-2017 GE Theresa May combining a big dose of social liberalism with a bit of a radical edge to it would have gone done pretty well as a Labour leadership offering. And a lot of Tories would have gone for Corbyn's long standing euroskepticism. Maybe they could arrange a busman's holiday for the duration of the negotiations?
  • alex.alex. Posts: 2,814
    ydoethur said:

    alex. said:

    Disappointed ministers don’t usually resign and call for a new direction. Just a thought for those pb Tories preparing a character assassination on the unknown politician.

    What do disappointed ministers usually do when they resign?
    Byers' and Mitchell's subsequent careers offer some pointers. And not in a good way.
    Neither of whom resigned after being passed over for promotion.
  • MortimerMortimer Posts: 9,688
    Haven't flown Ryanair for ages - can't stand the hand luggage policy.
  • CarlottaVanceCarlottaVance Posts: 28,345
    Osborne on r4 at 8.10
  • Morris_DancerMorris_Dancer Posts: 42,517
    Good morning, everyone.

    I wonder about this. If I were sharpening my knife, I wouldn't brief that I had bought a whetstone and was *this* close to using it.
  • NickPalmerNickPalmer Posts: 10,347

    Something in my gut tells me we could be very close, but I think it'd take a big beast of cabinet rank to trigger something (and probably not Hammond) and a junior minister (the headline says senior, but he quite clearly isn't) won't quite do it.

    Think that's right. One consideration might be that people who want May out will be aware that the local elections will probably not show any great movement, so the media story for those will be "relief for May". If they remove her soon, the new leader will probably be in post before May (the month), giving a chance for a honeymoon boost in the locals.
  • JWisemannJWisemann Posts: 1,037
    DavidL - Except Corbyn has the second highest record in the Commons for signing EDMs condemning Iran's human rights record, so it is being given short shrift by the sensible media as they know they are on a hiding-to-nothing. The hard-right fanatical lovers of grotesque Israeli human rights infractions at the likes of Guido's dreadful bilge-spewing site and 'Labour' Uncut (a front group for extreme right ultra-Blairite nutters) are out on a swivel-eyed limb with you here, I'm afraid.
  • Scott_PScott_P Posts: 35,872
    @BBCHelenCatt: BREAKING: @UKIP’s long-serving press spokesman @GawainTowler has resigned
  • MarqueeMarkMarqueeMark Posts: 17,612
    edited February 1
    Good to know that your "plane might not fly" for reasons other than no Ryanair pilots, or piss-poor Ryanair managment. If I were an analyst, I might just be expecting some more troubling news coming down the pike.

    Of course, I could be wrong, and next month Ryanair will show they are in the politics business by printing their recommendation on how to vote in the abortion referendum on tickets....
  • MarqueeMarkMarqueeMark Posts: 17,612
    Scott_P said:

    @BBCHelenCatt: BREAKING: @UKIP’s long-serving press spokesman @GawainTowler has resigned

    Shouldn't that be "long-suffering"?

    Never been short of work though.
  • NickPalmerNickPalmer Posts: 10,347
    ydoethur said:

    Interesting that the Sun is no longer as pervasive in my life as it used to be. The time was when every front page would pass my eyeballs at some time in the day. People just don't read newspapers at tea breaks any more. It must be at least partially losing its ability to drive the agenda.

    How do you know they're not reading it on their phones?
    There are stats on online access too - IIRC the Mail and the Guardian are, amazingly, the most-read news sites on the entire planet. I don't remember the Sun scoring significantly on that count.

    Both my current and last offices have BBC News 24 on in the tea room, and it's fairly common to see someone sipping from a mug and idly watching May or Trump or a sports champion. I've never seen anyone reading a paper or studying their phones there.
  • SquareRootSquareRoot Posts: 5,492

    Something in my gut tells me we could be very close, but I think it'd take a big beast of cabinet rank to trigger something (and probably not Hammond) and a junior minister (the headline says senior, but he quite clearly isn't) won't quite do it.

    Think that's right. One consideration might be that people who want May out will be aware that the local elections will probably not show any great movement, so the media story for those will be "relief for May". If they remove her soon, the new leader will probably be in post before May (the month), giving a chance for a honeymoon boost in the locals.
    Honeymoon boost in the locals.. LOL.. I doubt many will bother to vote.
  • MarqueeMarkMarqueeMark Posts: 17,612
    DavidL said:

    alex. said:

    If a 'senior minister' was that concerned about the failure to promote "young talent" from the backbenches, they could of course have made it a bit easier at the time of the reshuffle by making it clear that they didn't wish to continue themselves on the frontbench. Set an example and all that...

    Whilst this is true there is likely to be some despair that no-hopers such as Leadsom, Grayling and Fox were left in position in the reshuffle. That despair does not of course properly take account of how little room for manoeuvre May had and indeed any successor would have in a minority government.
    The only people who can move Leadsom, Grayling and Fox are the wider party. By choosing a new leader, with a new broom.
  • NickPalmerNickPalmer Posts: 10,347

    Good morning, everyone.

    I wonder about this. If I were sharpening my knife, I wouldn't brief that I had bought a whetstone and was *this* close to using it.

    Genuine LOL.

    I wondered in the same way about Kim saying that North Korea was within months of being able to attack the US with an ICBM. Seemed like saying "so attack me now", but it hasn't (probably fortunately) worked out like that, so far.
  • SandpitSandpit Posts: 17,709

    Good to know that your "plane might not fly" for reasons other than no Ryanair pilots, or piss-poor Ryanair managment. If I were an analyst, I might just be expecting some more troubling news coming down the pike.

    Of course, I could be wrong, and next month Ryanair will show they are in the politics business by printing their recommendation on how to vote in the abortion referendum on tickets....
    Getting their excuses in early for still not having enough pilots next year. Most of those leaving are Captains in their 40s, not easy to replace. And they're still leaving. Even the unemployed Monarch pilots don't want to work for O'Leary.
  • JosiasJessopJosiasJessop Posts: 19,553

    Sandpit said:

    Breaking: Train crash in Virginia, hit dumpster on the line. Train was carrying several US Congressmen including Speaker Ryan en route to a Republican policy retreat.
    Fatalities mentioned but not among the politicians.
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2018/01/31/train-carrying-republican-members-congress-including-house/
    Edit: Was a few hours ago now, one fatality in the truck.

    Train travel in the US is unacceptably dangerous. For all its faults, our railway industry does a fantastic job on safety.
    We've not only had ten years with no fatal accidents on our heavy rail network, we've also recently had a year where there have been no track worker fatalities. So much so, AIUI NR are now including figures for deaths travelling to work, and have started an internal campaign to get people to and from work safely.

    http://orr.gov.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0017/25622/rail-safety-statistics-2016-17.pdf

    But there is no room for complacency: there are still lots of accidents on the railways, and a study of RAIB's websites will show accidents that, if the dice had rolled another way, could easily have caused fatalities.
  • SandpitSandpit Posts: 17,709
    Sandpit said:

    Good to know that your "plane might not fly" for reasons other than no Ryanair pilots, or piss-poor Ryanair managment. If I were an analyst, I might just be expecting some more troubling news coming down the pike.

    Of course, I could be wrong, and next month Ryanair will show they are in the politics business by printing their recommendation on how to vote in the abortion referendum on tickets....
    Getting their excuses in early for still not having enough pilots next year. Most of those leaving are Captains in their 40s, not easy to replace. And they're still leaving. Even the unemployed Monarch pilots don't want to work for O'Leary.
    Edit: Ryanair have even allowed their UK based pilots to join a union in the hope of stopping them leaving!
    http://www.cityam.com/279707/ryanair-ties-up-historic-agreement-recognise-uk-pilots
  • eekeek Posts: 1,964
    Sandpit said:

    Good to know that your "plane might not fly" for reasons other than no Ryanair pilots, or piss-poor Ryanair managment. If I were an analyst, I might just be expecting some more troubling news coming down the pike.

    Of course, I could be wrong, and next month Ryanair will show they are in the politics business by printing their recommendation on how to vote in the abortion referendum on tickets....
    Getting their excuses in early for still not having enough pilots next year. Most of those leaving are Captains in their 40s, not easy to replace. And they're still leaving. Even the unemployed Monarch pilots don't want to work for O'Leary.
    Monarch pilots would need retraining as Monarch flew an Airbus fleet and Ryan Air use Boeing.

    Either way most Pilots would choice any other airline rather than Ryan air.
  • CarlottaVanceCarlottaVance Posts: 28,345
    Osborne played a very straight bat on R4 despite Robinson’s attempts to draw him on May replacement - though possibly hinted that while she was abroad was not the time to strike....
  • TOPPINGTOPPING Posts: 12,763
    Osborne back in contention for something or other; not quite sure what.
  • OblitusSumMeOblitusSumMe Posts: 4,924
    Scott_P said:
    On the charitable basis that I find it hard to believe that people are as stupid as they sometimes appear, I'm going to assume that this is not a serious negotiating position, but merely an attempt to placate the Hard Brexiteers who are antsy about the transition deal.
  • alex.alex. Posts: 2,814
    Scott_P said:
    It seems perfectly logical that people should not accrue long term rights during a transition period. That does not amount to a fight over freedom of movement. The EU position is just illogical, and it is they who are shifting the goalposts.
  • MarqueeMarkMarqueeMark Posts: 17,612
    Scott_P said:
    How did your counting go on the deficit reduction, eh George? Not enough fingers?
  • Sean_FSean_F Posts: 21,165

    Something in my gut tells me we could be very close, but I think it'd take a big beast of cabinet rank to trigger something (and probably not Hammond) and a junior minister (the headline says senior, but he quite clearly isn't) won't quite do it.

    Think that's right. One consideration might be that people who want May out will be aware that the local elections will probably not show any great movement, so the media story for those will be "relief for May". If they remove her soon, the new leader will probably be in post before May (the month), giving a chance for a honeymoon boost in the locals.
    If Populus is right, and if the local elections in London were to match last year's results, then Labour would gain about 130 seats in London, the Conservatives would lose about 80, and the Lib Dems about 25. In practice, there will be differences. Residents will win seats in Havering, the Conservatives will probably outperform their Parliamentary results in Wandsworth and Westminster, the Greens will win a handful of seats, and there will always be local factors.
  • Sean_FSean_F Posts: 21,165
    eek said:

    Sandpit said:

    Good to know that your "plane might not fly" for reasons other than no Ryanair pilots, or piss-poor Ryanair managment. If I were an analyst, I might just be expecting some more troubling news coming down the pike.

    Of course, I could be wrong, and next month Ryanair will show they are in the politics business by printing their recommendation on how to vote in the abortion referendum on tickets....
    Getting their excuses in early for still not having enough pilots next year. Most of those leaving are Captains in their 40s, not easy to replace. And they're still leaving. Even the unemployed Monarch pilots don't want to work for O'Leary.
    Monarch pilots would need retraining as Monarch flew an Airbus fleet and Ryan Air use Boeing.

    Either way most Pilots would choice any other airline rather than Ryan air.
    Travelling once on Ryanair was enough.
  • Morris_DancerMorris_Dancer Posts: 42,517
    Mr. Palmer, one aims to please.

    Meanwhile, in puritanical censorship news:
  • MarqueeMarkMarqueeMark Posts: 17,612
    Sean_F said:

    eek said:

    Sandpit said:

    Good to know that your "plane might not fly" for reasons other than no Ryanair pilots, or piss-poor Ryanair managment. If I were an analyst, I might just be expecting some more troubling news coming down the pike.

    Of course, I could be wrong, and next month Ryanair will show they are in the politics business by printing their recommendation on how to vote in the abortion referendum on tickets....
    Getting their excuses in early for still not having enough pilots next year. Most of those leaving are Captains in their 40s, not easy to replace. And they're still leaving. Even the unemployed Monarch pilots don't want to work for O'Leary.
    Monarch pilots would need retraining as Monarch flew an Airbus fleet and Ryan Air use Boeing.

    Either way most Pilots would choice any other airline rather than Ryan air.
    Travelling once on Ryanair was enough.
    They are pitching for the Remainer business.

    A marriage made in heaven.....
  • TOPPING said:

    Osborne back in contention for something or other; not quite sure what.

    The Willie Whitelaw to Prime Minister Gove.
  • SandpitSandpit Posts: 17,709
    edited February 1
    eek said:

    Sandpit said:

    Good to know that your "plane might not fly" for reasons other than no Ryanair pilots, or piss-poor Ryanair managment. If I were an analyst, I might just be expecting some more troubling news coming down the pike.

    Of course, I could be wrong, and next month Ryanair will show they are in the politics business by printing their recommendation on how to vote in the abortion referendum on tickets....
    Getting their excuses in early for still not having enough pilots next year. Most of those leaving are Captains in their 40s, not easy to replace. And they're still leaving. Even the unemployed Monarch pilots don't want to work for O'Leary.
    Monarch pilots would need retraining as Monarch flew an Airbus fleet and Ryan Air use Boeing.

    Either way most Pilots would choice any other airline rather than Ryan air.
    Yes, and Ryanair will charge you for the "Type Rating", something like 25k GBP if you want to work for them and are currently flying Airbus rather than Boeing planes.

    The pilots from Monarch seem to have gone to BA, TUI, Easy, Norwegian, some to the ME and China, but pretty much only a handful to Ryanair.
  • TheScreamingEaglesTheScreamingEagles Posts: 65,000
    edited February 1
    The minister will say

    'Prime Minister, your continued leadership makes Jeremy Corbyn as Prime Minister more likely, not less likely.'


    That's gonna sting.
  • not_on_firenot_on_fire Posts: 2,184
    alex. said:

    Scott_P said:
    It seems perfectly logical that people should not accrue long term rights during a transition period. That does not amount to a fight over freedom of movement. The EU position is just illogical, and it is they who are shifting the goalposts.
    The EU holds the whip hand and can demand whatever it wants. The claims of the Leave campaign that the EU would be desperate for a trade deal with us look rather quaint now.
  • Sean_FSean_F Posts: 21,165

    Mr. Palmer, one aims to please.

    Meanwhile, in puritanical censorship news:

    Is this a painting that you would allow your wife or servant to view?
  • Yes Nadine is the expert in giving loyalty to Tory PMs.
  • OldKingColeOldKingCole Posts: 11,047
    Sandpit said:

    Sandpit said:

    Good to know that your "plane might not fly" for reasons other than no Ryanair pilots, or piss-poor Ryanair managment. If I were an analyst, I might just be expecting some more troubling news coming down the pike.

    Of course, I could be wrong, and next month Ryanair will show they are in the politics business by printing their recommendation on how to vote in the abortion referendum on tickets....
    Getting their excuses in early for still not having enough pilots next year. Most of those leaving are Captains in their 40s, not easy to replace. And they're still leaving. Even the unemployed Monarch pilots don't want to work for O'Leary.
    Edit: Ryanair have even allowed their UK based pilots to join a union in the hope of stopping them leaving!
    http://www.cityam.com/279707/ryanair-ties-up-historic-agreement-recognise-uk-pilots
    'Allowed'to join a Union! What sort of company is this? Yeah, Ryanair.
  • Morris_DancerMorris_Dancer Posts: 42,517
    Mr. F, Castle Morris Dancer is full of painted masterpieces and Renaissance statues, most of which have topless women and stark naked men.

    The servants love it. I've had to put guards on Michelangelo's David just to stop the ladies, and a few fellows, from expressing their admiration in too forward a manner.
  • OldKingColeOldKingCole Posts: 11,047
    The Guardian has a piece this morning on 'emotional support animals', cconsequent on some American woman not being allowed to take her peacock on board an aeroplane. Ordinary commercial flight. Apparently it was an ESA, and therefore essential to her well being.

    Bleeding Gordon Bennett!!!!
  • malcolmgmalcolmg Posts: 18,908
    I see Colonel Blimp has been found out , in Scotland at least.
    https://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/politics/tory-revival-hits-buffers-party-11948745
  • SandpitSandpit Posts: 17,709

    The Guardian has a piece this morning on 'emotional support animals', cconsequent on some American woman not being allowed to take her peacock on board an aeroplane. Ordinary commercial flight. Apparently it was an ESA, and therefore essential to her well being.

    Bleeding Gordon Bennett!!!!

    It’s a big thing among the first class flyers of California apparently. They get a letter from their doctor saying they’ll be emotionally distressed if their dog/cat/whatever isn’t allowed to fly with them in the cabin. Apparently this makes them ‘disabled’ according to law and the airline is bound to go along with the scam.
  • IanB2IanB2 Posts: 9,827
    Sandpit said:

    The Guardian has a piece this morning on 'emotional support animals', cconsequent on some American woman not being allowed to take her peacock on board an aeroplane. Ordinary commercial flight. Apparently it was an ESA, and therefore essential to her well being.

    Bleeding Gordon Bennett!!!!

    It’s a big thing among the first class flyers of California apparently. They get a letter from their doctor saying they’ll be emotionally distressed if their dog/cat/whatever isn’t allowed to fly with them in the cabin. Apparently this makes them ‘disabled’ according to law and the airline is bound to go along with the scam.
    It's a well known way around most airlines' policies that pets travel in the hold (which is unpleasant and risky for them) unless they are medical assistance dogs.
  • Sean_FSean_F Posts: 21,165
    Sandpit said:

    The Guardian has a piece this morning on 'emotional support animals', cconsequent on some American woman not being allowed to take her peacock on board an aeroplane. Ordinary commercial flight. Apparently it was an ESA, and therefore essential to her well being.

    Bleeding Gordon Bennett!!!!

    It’s a big thing among the first class flyers of California apparently. They get a letter from their doctor saying they’ll be emotionally distressed if their dog/cat/whatever isn’t allowed to fly with them in the cabin. Apparently this makes them ‘disabled’ according to law and the airline is bound to go along with the scam.
    Could a passenger take a golliwog on board, on the ground that they need it for emotional support?
  • Morris_DancerMorris_Dancer Posts: 42,517
    Six Nations: the Scottish team has a player called Welsh. They're playing Wales. Hmm.
  • TykejohnnoTykejohnno Posts: 7,058
    Scott_P said:
    Sh!t's like Adonis are utterly shameful.

    If we listened to people like him,we would have the Merkel asylum policy.
  • SandpitSandpit Posts: 17,709
    Sean_F said:

    Sandpit said:

    The Guardian has a piece this morning on 'emotional support animals', cconsequent on some American woman not being allowed to take her peacock on board an aeroplane. Ordinary commercial flight. Apparently it was an ESA, and therefore essential to her well being.

    Bleeding Gordon Bennett!!!!

    It’s a big thing among the first class flyers of California apparently. They get a letter from their doctor saying they’ll be emotionally distressed if their dog/cat/whatever isn’t allowed to fly with them in the cabin. Apparently this makes them ‘disabled’ according to law and the airline is bound to go along with the scam.
    Could a passenger take a golliwog on board, on the ground that they need it for emotional support?
    Only a live one.

    That’s probably a good/bad idea for one of the US hidden camera shows - hire a black actor, have someone describe him as their “emotional support n****r” to the airline, and see what happens!
  • mwadamsmwadams Posts: 133
    Sean_F said:

    Mr. Palmer, one aims to please.

    Meanwhile, in puritanical censorship news:

    Is this a painting that you would allow your wife or servant to view?
    This feels like a cheesy publicity stunt - the kind of thing that never really provokes debate, just ranting in the Guardian's comments section.

    The key sentence is tucked at the end of the article.

    “We think it probably will return, yes, but hopefully contextualised quite differently. It is not just about that one painting, it is the whole context of the gallery.”

    So, it is not really about whether the art should be on display, but about how it should be curated. At the moment it seems that it is not being done all that well.

    That "hopefully" is a bit worrying, though. "Hopefully" we will not be totally useless at our job.

  • DecrepitJohnLDecrepitJohnL Posts: 8,026
    Scott_P said:
    Not to mention it is not true. There was no question about rights or transition periods on the referendum ballot paper.

    The 2017 Conservative manifesto said: We will control immigration and secure the entitlements of EU nationals in Britain and British nationals in the EU.
  • BannedInParisBannedInParis Posts: 1,757
    Sean_F said:

    Mr. Palmer, one aims to please.

    Meanwhile, in puritanical censorship news:

    Is this a painting that you would allow your wife or servant to view?
    shrugs.

    no penetration.
This discussion has been closed.