Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

politicalbetting.com » Blog Archive » PB Video Analysis: UK Property – What’s It Worth?

SystemSystem Posts: 6,389
edited July 9 in General

imagepoliticalbetting.com » Blog Archive » PB Video Analysis: UK Property – What’s It Worth?

In my last video – Castles of Sand? – I discussed the specific drivers behind UK, and specifically London, property prices.

Read the full story here


«13

Comments

  • RobDRobD Posts: 33,605
    First, and thank Robert!
  • williamglennwilliamglenn Posts: 21,552
    A bad day to bury good threads.
  • edmundintokyoedmundintokyo Posts: 8,892
    edited July 9
    Great and important video, no surprise the lizards are deploying all their underlings to try to distract attention.
  • AndyJSAndyJS Posts: 23,000
    Maria Caulfield and Ben Bradley have apparently resigned as vice-chairpersons of the Conservative Party.
  • RobDRobD Posts: 33,605
    Good, I don't think the goal is to stay in the single market.
  • AnazinaAnazina Posts: 1,960
    AndyJS said:

    Maria Caulfield and Ben Bradley have apparently resigned as vice-chairpersons of the Conservative Party.

    A perfect Charlie Falconer moment.
  • AndyJSAndyJS Posts: 23,000
    "Betrayed Brexit voters will give up on politics
    Melanie Phillips
    The fate of Davis, Johnson or the Tory party matters less than the damage done to democracy"

    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/edition/news/betrayed-brexit-voters-will-give-up-on-politics-jzs9z2bxk
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 32,798
    It's true, although a lot of people expect many things from it, not all unreasonably, and a great deal of acrimony will follow.
  • Torby_FennelTorby_Fennel Posts: 335


    My longstanding position of the last 2 years (which I have stuck to firmly on this site and elsewhere), that though I am a Remainer I accept the referendum result, has started to seriously crumble over the last few days as I watch the antics of the Brexiteers who won but aren't willing to bank their victory and keep wanting to push for ever crazier stuff.

    I'm not yet ready to reverse my acceptance of the democratic result - but the extreme Brexiteers are certainly testing my patience now.


  • AndyJSAndyJS Posts: 23,000
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 32,798

    All this “drip drip” of resignations will do is demonstrate to voters that the Tories are a bunch of in-fighting self indulgent navel gazers. But I guess it’s easier than actually coming up with an alternative plan....

    In fairness various of those resigning may have an alternative plan. What they don't necessarily have is the same plan, and what they definitely don't have is the support within the parliamentary party or parliament generally to carry out said plans.

    Now, if they cannot support the nearest thing that exists to a plan which does carry that support then they should resign, and they have to decide if they can live with a plan they cannot support possible going ahead. The MPs might decide they can on the anti-Corbyn principle of people being willing to moan endlessly about something but still back it, but some of their voters won't.

    In the meantime the ball is in the EU's court, and they will still assume they can get more.
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 32,798
    rcs1000 said:

    Alistair said:

    Question: does any Tory leadership candidate hard Brexiter have the votes of over a third of the Tory MPs?

    I have seen an analysis that there are 125 members and ex members of the ERG. 80 turned up to the meeting last night, the rest are or were in government.
    Look at the names resigning Maria Caulfield and Ben Bradley, not known as hard core leavers, in fact completely off the leaver radar before showing their colours.
    It's not as simple as that. There are members of the ERG who campaigned on Leave, and who campaigned for EFTA/EEA. They are probably reasonably happy with the current May position.
    I can well believe that some could or would have been in the same vein as Carswell seemed to, but won't have the ability or steel to defend it to the hilt now some big names have trashed it. If the EU tries for too much while ironing out the details such people, holding off defending it even as they are not that mad, will have been wise, as opinion turns even more against it.
    GIN1138 said:

    Scott_P said:
    Yeah but it's not only hardline Brexiteers who might be sending letters in. They'll also be enemies of Theresa. And the associates of Theresa's enemies,

    I still think allies of hers should send some in too, just so they get this fight over and done with.
  • dixiedeandixiedean Posts: 2,417



    My longstanding position of the last 2 years (which I have stuck to firmly on this site and elsewhere), that though I am a Remainer I accept the referendum result, has started to seriously crumble over the last few days as I watch the antics of the Brexiteers who won but aren't willing to bank their victory and keep wanting to push for ever crazier stuff.

    I'm not yet ready to reverse my acceptance of the democratic result - but the extreme Brexiteers are certainly testing my patience now.


    My thoughts almost exactly. I suspect we are not the only two.
  • kyf_100kyf_100 Posts: 956



    My longstanding position of the last 2 years (which I have stuck to firmly on this site and elsewhere), that though I am a Remainer I accept the referendum result, has started to seriously crumble over the last few days as I watch the antics of the Brexiteers who won but aren't willing to bank their victory and keep wanting to push for ever crazier stuff.

    I'm not yet ready to reverse my acceptance of the democratic result - but the extreme Brexiteers are certainly testing my patience now.


    Which is ironic, because the extreme, continuous and contemptuous attempts by remainers over the last couple of years to thwart democracy by any means necessary have certainly tested my patience. To the point where I'm inclined to think it's hard Brexit at any cost.
  • Big_G_NorthWalesBig_G_NorthWales Posts: 16,047
    dixiedean said:



    My longstanding position of the last 2 years (which I have stuck to firmly on this site and elsewhere), that though I am a Remainer I accept the referendum result, has started to seriously crumble over the last few days as I watch the antics of the Brexiteers who won but aren't willing to bank their victory and keep wanting to push for ever crazier stuff.

    I'm not yet ready to reverse my acceptance of the democratic result - but the extreme Brexiteers are certainly testing my patience now.


    My thoughts almost exactly. I suspect we are not the only two.
    I am with you both
  • dixiedeandixiedean Posts: 2,417
    AndyJS said:
    I fancy Belgium. Quality players all over the field. As have France. De Bruyne and Hazard are better though.
  • SandpitSandpit Posts: 19,760
    edited July 10
    Good video Robert, these are excellent.

    I’d argue that supply and demand for rental housing in London is a related but separate market to supply and demand for property to purchase, which goes some way to explaining why yields are so low at the moment.

    Also a good point at the end about a price correction not necessarily a good thing for everyone, if prices start dropping appreciably then lenders will be much more cautious on loan-to-value ratios which is bad news for the first time buyer.
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 32,798
    Some people want it:

    https://capx.co/could-jeremy-hunt-dance-his-way-to-the-top-job/

    Not sure a conclusion that Hunt's best chance comes with a no deal Brexit is a positive message though

    Hunt could be a unifying figure acceptable to Remainers and Leavers. But that will depend on the form that Brexit takes. If we have a “Brexit In Name Only” then there will be a strong demand from Conservatives for someone willing to “finish the job” — such as Michael Gove, Boris Johnson, or Jacob Rees-Mogg. If on the other hand we end up with a “no deal” Brexit then Hunt would be rather better placed, putting himself forward as the man with the energy and ability to lead us through the new challenges.
  • SandpitSandpit Posts: 19,760
    kle4 said:

    rcs1000 said:

    Alistair said:

    Question: does any Tory leadership candidate hard Brexiter have the votes of over a third of the Tory MPs?

    I have seen an analysis that there are 125 members and ex members of the ERG. 80 turned up to the meeting last night, the rest are or were in government.
    Look at the names resigning Maria Caulfield and Ben Bradley, not known as hard core leavers, in fact completely off the leaver radar before showing their colours.
    It's not as simple as that. There are members of the ERG who campaigned on Leave, and who campaigned for EFTA/EEA. They are probably reasonably happy with the current May position.
    I can well believe that some could or would have been in the same vein as Carswell seemed to, but won't have the ability or steel to defend it to the hilt now some big names have trashed it. If the EU tries for too much while ironing out the details such people, holding off defending it even as they are not that mad, will have been wise, as opinion turns even more against it.
    GIN1138 said:

    Scott_P said:
    Yeah but it's not only hardline Brexiteers who might be sending letters in. They'll also be enemies of Theresa. And the associates of Theresa's enemies,

    I still think allies of hers should send some in too, just so they get this fight over and done with.
    I’m with Dan Hannan, rcs1000, MaxPB and otihers in thinking that the Chequers plan just about works, but it won’t take much watering down to cause a large swing against it from Conservatives. The EU reaction is now crucial to Mrs May’s survival.

    Allies sending in letters is playing with fire, she wouldn’t be in control of the process and anything could happen.
  • BromptonautBromptonaut Posts: 971
    kle4 said:

    All this “drip drip” of resignations will do is demonstrate to voters that the Tories are a bunch of in-fighting self indulgent navel gazers. But I guess it’s easier than actually coming up with an alternative plan....

    In fairness various of those resigning may have an alternative plan. What they don't necessarily have is the same plan, and what they definitely don't have is the support within the parliamentary party or parliament generally to carry out said plans.

    Now, if they cannot support the nearest thing that exists to a plan which does carry that support then they should resign, and they have to decide if they can live with a plan they cannot support possible going ahead. The MPs might decide they can on the anti-Corbyn principle of people being willing to moan endlessly about something but still back it, but some of their voters won't.

    In the meantime the ball is in the EU's court, and they will still assume they can get more.
    The ball is not in the EU’s court.

    Firstly the White Paper has not yet been published.

    Secondly Brexit is not like a game of tennis.
  • jayfdeejayfdee Posts: 507
    Thanks the video is a very interesting view, yes I watched it through to the end.
    I would comment, yes we can do very clever things with video, but I found the backdrops, and the constant changes, very clever, and hard production work, but very distracting from the message.
    A correction must be due, some buyers will suffer.
  • Big_G_NorthWalesBig_G_NorthWales Posts: 16,047
    Belgium ok so far
  • tlg86tlg86 Posts: 9,120
    Robert, really interesting analysis. I mentioned on Youtube that I think you can add double incomes as a contributory factor to rising house prices. I also think you can add extending the length of mortgages. I think there were stats showing that the average length of a mortgage was around 25 years pre-2008. Since then I think it's increased to over 30 years.

    I am very bearish on London and Southeast house prices. But I thought might fallen in 2011-12, and I was wrong. So if you're around, my questions are:

    1. Did you expect prices to rise as they did from 2011 to now?
    2. If not, what makes you think that things are going to change in the next few years?
  • RobDRobD Posts: 33,605

    kle4 said:

    All this “drip drip” of resignations will do is demonstrate to voters that the Tories are a bunch of in-fighting self indulgent navel gazers. But I guess it’s easier than actually coming up with an alternative plan....

    In fairness various of those resigning may have an alternative plan. What they don't necessarily have is the same plan, and what they definitely don't have is the support within the parliamentary party or parliament generally to carry out said plans.

    Now, if they cannot support the nearest thing that exists to a plan which does carry that support then they should resign, and they have to decide if they can live with a plan they cannot support possible going ahead. The MPs might decide they can on the anti-Corbyn principle of people being willing to moan endlessly about something but still back it, but some of their voters won't.

    In the meantime the ball is in the EU's court, and they will still assume they can get more.
    The ball is not in the EU’s court.

    Firstly the White Paper has not yet been published.

    Secondly Brexit is not like a game of tennis.
    But the main points have been established. Unless it is going to be changed, we now have to wait for the EUs response.
  • DavidLDavidL Posts: 21,938
    Sorry WC final started. The winner of this gets a yellow jersey parade down the Champs Eleysee to win the title on Sunday but this is what it is all about.
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 32,798
    edited July 10

    kle4 said:

    All this “drip drip” of resignations will do is demonstrate to voters that the Tories are a bunch of in-fighting self indulgent navel gazers. But I guess it’s easier than actually coming up with an alternative plan....

    In fairness various of those resigning may have an alternative plan. What they don't necessarily have is the same plan, and what they definitely don't have is the support within the parliamentary party or parliament generally to carry out said plans.

    Now, if they cannot support the nearest thing that exists to a plan which does carry that support then they should resign, and they have to decide if they can live with a plan they cannot support possible going ahead. The MPs might decide they can on the anti-Corbyn principle of people being willing to moan endlessly about something but still back it, but some of their voters won't.

    In the meantime the ball is in the EU's court, and they will still assume they can get more.
    The ball is not in the EU’s court.

    Firstly the White Paper has not yet been published.

    Secondly Brexit is not like a game of tennis.
    You object to people using metaphors? I think that's sanctimonious nonsense, and I certainly won't stop doing it, and in fact will use them more if people get uppity about people making less than literal comparisons in aid of explanation (Shockingly, I am aware Brexit is not a game of Tennis), or indeed simply make use of standard expressions. You've never utilised an expression which was not a literal comparison? Pull the other one.

    And if you merely object to the suitability of the metaphor and not the use of metaphor itself, I would content it is in their court because no matter what the White Paper contains, the EU's response will be key. The ball is over the net, though how it reacts when it bounces mean the details are not certain yet.

    Moreover, even if it is not a great comparison, it was just an expression and the point was clear - what we do next is heavily reliant on what they do next.
  • MaxPBMaxPB Posts: 15,478
    DavidL said:

    Sorry WC final started. The winner of this gets a yellow jersey parade down the Champs Eleysee to win the title on Sunday but this is what it is all about.

    Never had you down as a bitter Scot, David!
  • DavidLDavidL Posts: 21,938
    MaxPB said:

    DavidL said:

    Sorry WC final started. The winner of this gets a yellow jersey parade down the Champs Eleysee to win the title on Sunday but this is what it is all about.

    Never had you down as a bitter Scot, David!
    Not bitter at all and I will be cheering England all the way but the quality of these 2 teams is breathtaking.
  • nunuonenunuone Posts: 612
    MaxPB said:

    DavidL said:

    Sorry WC final started. The winner of this gets a yellow jersey parade down the Champs Eleysee to win the title on Sunday but this is what it is all about.

    Never had you down as a bitter Scot, David!
    A bitter Scott P!
  • logical_songlogical_song Posts: 6,126
    kle4 said:

    kle4 said:

    All this “drip drip” of resignations will do is demonstrate to voters that the Tories are a bunch of in-fighting self indulgent navel gazers. But I guess it’s easier than actually coming up with an alternative plan....

    In fairness various of those resigning may have an alternative plan. What they don't necessarily have is the same plan, and what they definitely don't have is the support within the parliamentary party or parliament generally to carry out said plans.

    Now, if they cannot support the nearest thing that exists to a plan which does carry that support then they should resign, and they have to decide if they can live with a plan they cannot support possible going ahead. The MPs might decide they can on the anti-Corbyn principle of people being willing to moan endlessly about something but still back it, but some of their voters won't.

    In the meantime the ball is in the EU's court, and they will still assume they can get more.
    The ball is not in the EU’s court.

    Firstly the White Paper has not yet been published.

    Secondly Brexit is not like a game of tennis.
    You object to people using metaphors? I think that's sanctimonious nonsense, and I certainly won't stop doing it, and in fact will use them more if people get uppity about people making less than literal comparisons in aid of explanation (Shockingly, I am aware Brexit is not a game of Tennis), or indeed simply make use of standard expressions. You've never utilised an expression which was not a literal comparison? Pull the other one.

    And if you merely object to the suitability of the metaphor and not the use of metaphor itself, I would content it is in their court because no matter what the White Paper contains, the EU's response will be key. The ball is over the net, though how it reacts when it bounces mean the details are not certain yet.

    Moreover, even if it is not a great comparison, it was just an expression and the point was clear - what we do next is heavily reliant on what they do next.
    The UK will have to serve up the White Paper before the ball can be in the EU's court - and it's always possible it could hit the net or be out.
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 32,798
    DavidL said:

    MaxPB said:

    DavidL said:

    Sorry WC final started. The winner of this gets a yellow jersey parade down the Champs Eleysee to win the title on Sunday but this is what it is all about.

    Never had you down as a bitter Scot, David!
    Not bitter at all and I will be cheering England all the way but the quality of these 2 teams is breathtaking.
    Even great teams have off days and get unlucky! Liverpool are not the second best team in Europe - they aren't even the second best team in England - but still managed to be Champion's League finalists.

    Not the same format of course, but there's hope for England/Croatia yet.
  • DavidLDavidL Posts: 21,938
    What a shot. What a save.
  • RobDRobD Posts: 33,605
    edited July 10

    kle4 said:

    kle4 said:

    All this “drip drip” of resignations will do is demonstrate to voters that the Tories are a bunch of in-fighting self indulgent navel gazers. But I guess it’s easier than actually coming up with an alternative plan....

    In fairness various of those resigning may have an alternative plan. What they don't necessarily have is the same plan, and what they definitely don't have is the support within the parliamentary party or parliament generally to carry out said plans.

    Now, if they cannot support the nearest thing that exists to a plan which does carry that support then they should resign, and they have to decide if they can live with a plan they cannot support possible going ahead. The MPs might decide they can on the anti-Corbyn principle of people being willing to moan endlessly about something but still back it, but some of their voters won't.

    In the meantime the ball is in the EU's court, and they will still assume they can get more.
    The ball is not in the EU’s court.

    Firstly the White Paper has not yet been published.

    Secondly Brexit is not like a game of tennis.
    You object to people using metaphors? I think that's sanctimonious nonsense, and I certainly won't stop doing it, and in fact will use them more if people get uppity about people making less than literal comparisons in aid of explanation (Shockingly, I am aware Brexit is not a game of Tennis), or indeed simply make use of standard expressions. You've never utilised an expression which was not a literal comparison? Pull the other one.

    And if you merely object to the suitability of the metaphor and not the use of metaphor itself, I would content it is in their court because no matter what the White Paper contains, the EU's response will be key. The ball is over the net, though how it reacts when it bounces mean the details are not certain yet.

    Moreover, even if it is not a great comparison, it was just an expression and the point was clear - what we do next is heavily reliant on what they do next.
    The UK will have to serve up the White Paper before the ball can be in the EU's court - and it's always possible it could hit the net or be out.
    I find it hard to believe there will be substantive changes on what was trailed at chequers.
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 32,798

    kle4 said:

    kle4 said:

    All this “drip drip” of resignations will do is demonstrate to voters that the Tories are a bunch of in-fighting self indulgent navel gazers. But I guess it’s easier than actually coming up with an alternative plan....

    In fairness various of those resigning may have an alternative plan. What they don't necessarily have is the same plan, and what they definitely don't have is the support within the parliamentary party or parliament generally to carry out said plans.

    Now, if they cannot support the nearest thing that exists to a plan which does carry that support then they should resign, and they have to decide if they can live with a plan they cannot support possible going ahead. The MPs might decide they can on the anti-Corbyn principle of people being willing to moan endlessly about something but still back it, but some of their voters won't.

    In the meantime the ball is in the EU's court, and they will still assume they can get more.
    The ball is not in the EU’s court.

    Firstly the White Paper has not yet been published.

    Secondly Brexit is not like a game of tennis.
    You object to people using metaphors? I think that's sanctimonious nonsense, and I certainly won't stop doing it, and in fact will use them more if people get uppity about people making less than literal comparisons in aid of explanation (Shockingly, I am aware Brexit is not a game of Tennis), or indeed simply make use of standard expressions. You've never utilised an expression which was not a literal comparison? Pull the other one.

    And if you merely object to the suitability of the metaphor and not the use of metaphor itself, I would content it is in their court because no matter what the White Paper contains, the EU's response will be key. The ball is over the net, though how it reacts when it bounces mean the details are not certain yet.

    Moreover, even if it is not a great comparison, it was just an expression and the point was clear - what we do next is heavily reliant on what they do next.
    The UK will have to serve up the White Paper before the ball can be in the EU's court - and it's always possible it could hit the net or be out.
    Ah, that's where the metaphor is so brilliant, do you see? Not so - the EU has to respond, either to say yes, no, needs work etc. Therefore the ball is in, it may just be a godawful service delivery and be smashed away, but it is at least over the net.
  • DavidLDavidL Posts: 21,938
    kle4 said:

    DavidL said:

    MaxPB said:

    DavidL said:

    Sorry WC final started. The winner of this gets a yellow jersey parade down the Champs Eleysee to win the title on Sunday but this is what it is all about.

    Never had you down as a bitter Scot, David!
    Not bitter at all and I will be cheering England all the way but the quality of these 2 teams is breathtaking.
    Even great teams have off days and get unlucky! Liverpool are not the second best team in Europe - they aren't even the second best team in England - but still managed to be Champion's League finalists.

    Not the same format of course, but there's hope for England/Croatia yet.
    kle4 said:

    DavidL said:

    MaxPB said:

    DavidL said:

    Sorry WC final started. The winner of this gets a yellow jersey parade down the Champs Eleysee to win the title on Sunday but this is what it is all about.

    Never had you down as a bitter Scot, David!
    Not bitter at all and I will be cheering England all the way but the quality of these 2 teams is breathtaking.
    Even great teams have off days and get unlucky! Liverpool are not the second best team in Europe - they aren't even the second best team in England - but still managed to be Champion's League finalists.

    Not the same format of course, but there's hope for England/Croatia yet.
    That’s why we watch. Anything is possible in a one off game but these teams are just superb.
  • logical_songlogical_song Posts: 6,126
    kle4 said:

    It's true, although a lot of people expect many things from it, not all unreasonably, and a great deal of acrimony will follow.
    You should have stopped after the first two words.
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 32,798

    kle4 said:

    It's true, although a lot of people expect many things from it, not all unreasonably, and a great deal of acrimony will follow.
    You should have stopped after the first two words.
    Story of my life - concision is not my strong suit.
  • AndyJSAndyJS Posts: 23,000
    I wish rcs1000 had been making videos for the last 10 years, I probably would have learned a lot of useful things.
  • BromptonautBromptonaut Posts: 971
    kle4 said:

    kle4 said:

    All this “drip drip” of resignations will do is demonstrate to voters that the Tories are a bunch of in-fighting self indulgent navel gazers. But I guess it’s easier than actually coming up with an alternative plan....

    In fairness various of those resigning may have an alternative plan. What they don't necessarily have is the same plan, and what they definitely don't have is the support within the parliamentary party or parliament generally to carry out said plans.

    Now, if they cannot support the nearest thing that exists to a plan which does carry that support then they should resign, and they have to decide if they can live with a plan they cannot support possible going ahead. The MPs might decide they can on the anti-Corbyn principle of people being willing to moan endlessly about something but still back it, but some of their voters won't.

    In the meantime the ball is in the EU's court, and they will still assume they can get more.
    The ball is not in the EU’s court.

    Firstly the White Paper has not yet been published.

    Secondly Brexit is not like a game of tennis.
    You object to people using metaphors? I think that's sanctimonious nonsense, and I certainly won't stop doing it, and in fact will use them more if people get uppity about people making less than literal comparisons in aid of explanation (Shockingly, I am aware Brexit is not a game of Tennis), or indeed simply make use of standard expressions. You've never utilised an expression which was not a literal comparison? Pull the other one.

    And if you merely object to the suitability of the metaphor and not the use of metaphor itself, I would content it is in their court because no matter what the White Paper contains, the EU's response will be key. The ball is over the net, though how it reacts when it bounces mean the details are not certain yet.

    Moreover, even if it is not a great comparison, it was just an expression and the point was clear - what we do next is heavily reliant on what they do next.
    Calm down dear.
  • DavidLDavidL Posts: 21,938
    Something like 2/3 of these players play in the EPL. We are indeed fortunate.
  • MaxPBMaxPB Posts: 15,478
    DavidL said:

    MaxPB said:

    DavidL said:

    Sorry WC final started. The winner of this gets a yellow jersey parade down the Champs Eleysee to win the title on Sunday but this is what it is all about.

    Never had you down as a bitter Scot, David!
    Not bitter at all and I will be cheering England all the way but the quality of these 2 teams is breathtaking.
    I think anyone can win in the final. Look at all of those FA Cup finals that haven't been on script. That Arsenal robbery against United was one for the history books. If England make it then we've got a chance against anyone.
  • williamglennwilliamglenn Posts: 21,552
    Video suggestion for @rcs1000: can you do one on your alternative Brexit plan?
  • MaxPBMaxPB Posts: 15,478
    DavidL said:

    Something like 2/3 of these players play in the EPL. We are indeed fortunate.

    Four Spurs player on the pitch!

    I think we've had an incredible tournament club wise.
  • tlg86tlg86 Posts: 9,120
    MaxPB said:

    DavidL said:

    MaxPB said:

    DavidL said:

    Sorry WC final started. The winner of this gets a yellow jersey parade down the Champs Eleysee to win the title on Sunday but this is what it is all about.

    Never had you down as a bitter Scot, David!
    Not bitter at all and I will be cheering England all the way but the quality of these 2 teams is breathtaking.
    I think anyone can win in the final. Look at all of those FA Cup finals that haven't been on script. That Arsenal robbery against United was one for the history books. If England make it then we've got a chance against anyone.
    I remember saying before the penalties in 2005 that we'd win because we had a German in goal. A very satisfying win. :D
  • DavidLDavidL Posts: 21,938
    MaxPB said:

    DavidL said:

    Something like 2/3 of these players play in the EPL. We are indeed fortunate.

    Four Spurs player on the pitch!

    I think we've had an incredible tournament club wise.
    MaxPB said:

    DavidL said:

    Something like 2/3 of these players play in the EPL. We are indeed fortunate.

    Four Spurs player on the pitch!

    I think we've had an incredible tournament club wise.
    True. But I have looked at the rampaging Lukaku, the forward runs of Pogba, the brilliance of Lingard and the power of Fellaini and I wonder if Mourinho really got the best out of that squad last year. His cautious, percentage football is not only boring, it’s old fashioned.
  • MaxPBMaxPB Posts: 15,478
    Lol, one of my mates from Switzerland (a German) is saying that England have to start winning properly or people won't recognise them as true champions. Personally, I don't care how we win, set piece, last minute penalty, dodgy offside goal. I'll take anything!
  • rpjsrpjs Posts: 999
    MaxPB said:

    Lol, one of my mates from Switzerland (a German) is saying that England have to start winning properly or people won't recognise them as true champions. Personally, I don't care how we win, set piece, last minute penalty, dodgy offside goal. I'll take anything!

    He's probably still sore at the Soviet linesman calling the third goal "for Stalingrad".
  • dixiedeandixiedean Posts: 2,417
    edited July 10
    After that half, it may be coming home, but I will not be wagering much on it.
  • FregglesFreggles Posts: 2,829
    kle4 said:



    In fairness various of those resigning may have an alternative plan. What they don't necessarily have is the same plan, and what they definitely don't have is the support within the parliamentary party or parliament generally to carry out said plans.

    Now, if they cannot support the nearest thing that exists to a plan which does carry that support then they should resign, and they have to decide if they can live with a plan they cannot support possible going ahead. The MPs might decide they can on the anti-Corbyn principle of people being willing to moan endlessly about something but still back it, but some of their voters won't.

    In the meantime the ball is in the EU's court, and they will still assume they can get more.

  • DavidLDavidL Posts: 21,938
    MaxPB said:

    Lol, one of my mates from Switzerland (a German) is saying that England have to start winning properly or people won't recognise them as true champions. Personally, I don't care how we win, set piece, last minute penalty, dodgy offside goal. I'll take anything!

    England’s win against Sweden was positively Germanic. By far their best performance of the WC to date.
  • MaxPBMaxPB Posts: 15,478
    edited July 10
    DavidL said:

    MaxPB said:

    Lol, one of my mates from Switzerland (a German) is saying that England have to start winning properly or people won't recognise them as true champions. Personally, I don't care how we win, set piece, last minute penalty, dodgy offside goal. I'll take anything!

    England’s win against Sweden was positively Germanic. By far their best performance of the WC to date.
    He's replied to the chorus of similar replies saying that Sweden don't count because they're shit (neither do Panama). He's got to be the most bitter German fan that I know. The rest of them in that group are much more supportive of England winning.
  • AnneJGPAnneJGP Posts: 2,276
    kyf_100 said:



    My longstanding position of the last 2 years (which I have stuck to firmly on this site and elsewhere), that though I am a Remainer I accept the referendum result, has started to seriously crumble over the last few days as I watch the antics of the Brexiteers who won but aren't willing to bank their victory and keep wanting to push for ever crazier stuff.

    I'm not yet ready to reverse my acceptance of the democratic result - but the extreme Brexiteers are certainly testing my patience now.


    Which is ironic, because the extreme, continuous and contemptuous attempts by remainers over the last couple of years to thwart democracy by any means necessary have certainly tested my patience. To the point where I'm inclined to think it's hard Brexit at any cost.
    I would much prefer a genuine undocking followed by a slow change of course.

    But with so many pretences, subterfuges, subtleties and outright lies still in play, at least with a hard Brexit we will know we have definitely, actually left.

    Good evening, everyone.
  • DavidLDavidL Posts: 21,938
    Freggles said:

    kle4 said:



    In fairness various of those resigning may have an alternative plan. What they don't necessarily have is the same plan, and what they definitely don't have is the support within the parliamentary party or parliament generally to carry out said plans.

    Now, if they cannot support the nearest thing that exists to a plan which does carry that support then they should resign, and they have to decide if they can live with a plan they cannot support possible going ahead. The MPs might decide they can on the anti-Corbyn principle of people being willing to moan endlessly about something but still back it, but some of their voters won't.

    In the meantime the ball is in the EU's court, and they will still assume they can get more.

    Oh I miss the West Wing. Such brilliant writing.
  • FloaterFloater Posts: 5,822
    Thats fine -even May doesn't want to be in single market ... or was that another lie?
  • FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 29,807
    edited July 10
    Former England batsman Geoffrey Boycott is recovering at home after quadruple heart bypass surgery, his family have said. The 77-year-old, now a commentator for the BBC's Test Match Special, spent 10 days in hospital in Leeds after having the operation on 27 June.

    I feel sorry for the poor doctors and nurses who had to put up with him for 10 days telling him what they were doing wrong and how his mum could have done it better.
  • FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 29,807
    edited July 10
    The other lakuku has turned up his evening. The totally unplayable world class striker that played against brazil has stayed at home.
  • AnneJGPAnneJGP Posts: 2,276
    Sandpit said:

    Good video Robert, these are excellent.

    I’d argue that supply and demand for rental housing in London is a related but separate market to supply and demand for property to purchase, which goes some way to explaining why yields are so low at the moment.

    Also a good point at the end about a price correction not necessarily a good thing for everyone, if prices start dropping appreciably then lenders will be much more cautious on loan-to-value ratios which is bad news for the first time buyer.

    The topics are really interesting but unfortunately I just can't decipher very fast speech. All I can actually understand is the last few words before a slight gap.
  • OllyTOllyT Posts: 1,696

    dixiedean said:



    My longstanding position of the last 2 years (which I have stuck to firmly on this site and elsewhere), that though I am a Remainer I accept the referendum result, has started to seriously crumble over the last few days as I watch the antics of the Brexiteers who won but aren't willing to bank their victory and keep wanting to push for ever crazier stuff.

    I'm not yet ready to reverse my acceptance of the democratic result - but the extreme Brexiteers are certainly testing my patience now.


    My thoughts almost exactly. I suspect we are not the only two.
    I am with you both
    Me too. I find myself agreeing with you practically all the time these days BiG G (other than on football where I am of the blue Manchester persuasion!) I think a lot of remainers who have been hitherto happy to just honour the referendum result are not going to sit back while the likes of Mogg try to push the country in a very economically damaging exit.
  • Big_G_NorthWalesBig_G_NorthWales Posts: 16,047
    OllyT said:

    dixiedean said:



    My longstanding position of the last 2 years (which I have stuck to firmly on this site and elsewhere), that though I am a Remainer I accept the referendum result, has started to seriously crumble over the last few days as I watch the antics of the Brexiteers who won but aren't willing to bank their victory and keep wanting to push for ever crazier stuff.

    I'm not yet ready to reverse my acceptance of the democratic result - but the extreme Brexiteers are certainly testing my patience now.


    My thoughts almost exactly. I suspect we are not the only two.
    I am with you both
    Me too. I find myself agreeing with you practically all the time these days BiG G (other than on football where I am of the blue Manchester persuasion!) I think a lot of remainers who have been hitherto happy to just honour the referendum result are not going to sit back while the likes of Mogg try to push the country in a very economically damaging exit.
    My Father supported both as he said they were representing Manchester
  • FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 29,807
    edited July 10
    More iCrap...what have they done to their reputation of world class software engineering..every update is a more bug filled bollocks.

    https://m.slashdot.org/story/343198
  • FloaterFloater Posts: 5,822
    The more I think about this I dont think the establishment tories ever planned to leave

    They had the deck stacked in their favour and called in favours before the referendum to get people to tell us how bad it would be.

    They even got Obama to say back of the queue

    So then we have May saying she listens to result and Brexit means Brexit

    Followed by no preparations for no deal

    A constant backsliding as to our position and red lines

    Committing to give them the money for basically nothing

    undermining her colleagues whose job it was to negotiate

    Signing up to arrangements that basically box us in

    Getting government ministers to get big companies come out with yet more scare stories

    (sounds familiar right, they did that before the vote)

    It looks like freedom of movement will not end

    No wonder people despise politicians

  • OblitusSumMeOblitusSumMe Posts: 5,374
    DavidL said:

    MaxPB said:

    DavidL said:

    Something like 2/3 of these players play in the EPL. We are indeed fortunate.

    Four Spurs player on the pitch!

    I think we've had an incredible tournament club wise.
    MaxPB said:

    DavidL said:

    Something like 2/3 of these players play in the EPL. We are indeed fortunate.

    Four Spurs player on the pitch!

    I think we've had an incredible tournament club wise.
    True. But I have looked at the rampaging Lukaku, the forward runs of Pogba, the brilliance of Lingard and the power of Fellaini and I wonder if Mourinho really got the best out of that squad last year. His cautious, percentage football is not only boring, it’s old fashioned.
    Absolutely. The romantic in me would like to see Giggs given the chance to manage the club.
  • FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 29,807
    France ahead....beligum not playing anything like they did against Brazil.
  • Big_G_NorthWalesBig_G_NorthWales Posts: 16,047

    France ahead....beligum not playing anything like they did against Brazil.

    Lukaku looks like a donkey
  • FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 29,807
    edited July 10

    France ahead....beligum not playing anything like they did against Brazil.

    Lukaku looks like a donkey
    Against Brazil he was unplayable....tonight he is unplayable in a different respect, but Belgium didn't take ogiri so they don't have a like for like replacement.
  • FensterFenster Posts: 1,625
    edited July 10
    These videos are great! Good work!

    Like I said the other day my property value in pretty little Ystrad Mynach had risen £14,500 since I bought it in April 2005. It's a 4-bed detached on a lovely, quiet new'ish (1999) estate.

    The house sold for £99,000 as a new-build. So it doubled in value over its first six years.

    Since then its modest rise in value has been sensible and healthy. It appears our local housing market rectified itself well.
  • DavidLDavidL Posts: 21,938

    Former England batsman Geoffrey Boycott is recovering at home after quadruple heart bypass surgery, his family have said. The 77-year-old, now a commentator for the BBC's Test Match Special, spent 10 days in hospital in Leeds after having the operation on 27 June.

    I feel sorry for the poor doctors and nurses who had to put up with him for 10 days telling him what they were doing wrong and how his mum could have done it better.

    Not to mention the multiple, if obscure, references to sticks of ruhbarb.
  • tlg86tlg86 Posts: 9,120

    More iCrap...what have they done to their reputation of world class software engineering..every update is a more big filled bollocks.

    https://m.slashdot.org/story/343198

    I went through all of this a few months ago. I basically switched everything off, especially the stuff that constantly looks for updates and it made a big difference to battery life. I'm also refusing to install any more updates.
  • dixiedeandixiedean Posts: 2,417

    France ahead....beligum not playing anything like they did against Brazil.

    Lukaku looks like a donkey
    Unplayable one game, anonymous the next. We Evertonians got used to it. There was surprisingly little dissent when he went.
    (Cue a hat-trick of course).
  • MikeSmithsonMikeSmithson Posts: 4,621
    So we can expect to meet Belgium in the third place playoff final on Saturday
  • FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 29,807
    France could well win this world cup after only getting out of first gear in one game. Again tonight they are just comfortably winning without having to really bust a gut.
  • FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 29,807

    So we can expect to meet Belgium in the third place playoff final on Saturday

    I predict a replay of the 2nd XIs game.
  • FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 29,807
    Beligum are playing like a team that feel after beating Brazil so easily they have nothing else to prove.
  • AnneJGPAnneJGP Posts: 2,276

    kle4 said:

    kle4 said:

    All this “drip drip” of resignations will do is demonstrate to voters that the Tories are a bunch of in-fighting self indulgent navel gazers. But I guess it’s easier than actually coming up with an alternative plan....

    In fairness various of those resigning may have an alternative plan. What they don't necessarily have is the same plan, and what they definitely don't have is the support within the parliamentary party or parliament generally to carry out said plans.

    Now, if they cannot support the nearest thing that exists to a plan which does carry that support then they should resign, and they have to decide if they can live with a plan they cannot support possible going ahead. The MPs might decide they can on the anti-Corbyn principle of people being willing to moan endlessly about something but still back it, but some of their voters won't.

    In the meantime the ball is in the EU's court, and they will still assume they can get more.
    The ball is not in the EU’s court.

    Firstly the White Paper has not yet been published.

    Secondly Brexit is not like a game of tennis.
    You object to people using metaphors? I think that's sanctimonious nonsense, and I certainly won't stop doing it, and in fact will use them more if people get uppity about people making less than literal comparisons in aid of explanation (Shockingly, I am aware Brexit is not a game of Tennis), or indeed simply make use of standard expressions. You've never utilised an expression which was not a literal comparison? Pull the other one.

    And if you merely object to the suitability of the metaphor and not the use of metaphor itself, I would content it is in their court because no matter what the White Paper contains, the EU's response will be key. The ball is over the net, though how it reacts when it bounces mean the details are not certain yet.

    Moreover, even if it is not a great comparison, it was just an expression and the point was clear - what we do next is heavily reliant on what they do next.
    The UK will have to serve up the White Paper before the ball can be in the EU's court - and it's always possible it could hit the net or be out.
    Why is the EU waiting for the White Paper before responding, this time? On previous occasions they've rubbished what was said only moments after Mrs May stopped speaking.
  • HYUFDHYUFD Posts: 44,886
    London as a global city is competing more with New York, Paris, LA and Tokyo in terms of property buyer and hence price than UK regional cities like Birmingham, Manchester, Cardiff and Edinburgh
  • Big_G_NorthWalesBig_G_NorthWales Posts: 16,047
    AnneJGP said:

    kle4 said:

    kle4 said:

    All this “drip drip” of resignations will do is demonstrate to voters that the Tories are a bunch of in-fighting self indulgent navel gazers. But I guess it’s easier than actually coming up with an alternative plan....

    In fairness various of those resigning may have an alternative plan. What they don't necessarily have is the same plan, and what they definitely don't have is the support within the parliamentary party or parliament generally to carry out said plans.

    Now, if they cannot support the nearest thing that exists to a plan which does carry that support then they should resign, and they have to decide if they can live with a plan they cannot support possible going ahead. The MPs might decide they can on the anti-Corbyn principle of people being willing to moan endlessly about something but still back it, but some of their voters won't.

    In the meantime the ball is in the EU's court, and they will still assume they can get more.
    The ball is not in the EU’s court.

    Firstly the White Paper has not yet been published.

    Secondly Brexit is not like a game of tennis.
    You object to people using metaphors? I think that's sanctimonious nonsense, and I certainly won't stop doing it, and in fact will use them more if people get uppity about people making less than literal comparisons in aid of explanation (Shockingly, I am aware Brexit is not a game of Tennis), or indeed simply make use of standard expressions. You've never utilised an expression which was not a literal comparison? Pull the other one.

    And if you merely object to the suitability of the metaphor and not the use of metaphor itself, I would content it is in their court because no matter what the White Paper contains, the EU's response will be key. The ball is over the net, though how it reacts when it bounces mean the details are not certain yet.

    Moreover, even if it is not a great comparison, it was just an expression and the point was clear - what we do next is heavily reliant on what they do next.
    The UK will have to serve up the White Paper before the ball can be in the EU's court - and it's always possible it could hit the net or be out.
    Why is the EU waiting for the White Paper before responding, this time? On previous occasions they've rubbished what was said only moments after Mrs May stopped speaking.
    Barnier has said today the deal is 80% agreed and expects agreement in full by the October summit
  • MaxPBMaxPB Posts: 15,478
    I think if you look at the four semi finalists, the quality of the premier league is showing through with abundance. I think it's only Croatia where the largest group doesn't play in the league.
  • FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 29,807
    MaxPB said:

    I think if you look at the four semi finalists, the quality of the premier league is showing through with abundance. I think it's only Croatia where the largest group doesn't play in the league.

    One of the most amazing stats, 50 players at the world cup are french...Paris born players alone could put out a world class team that could probably beat everybody else.
  • dixiedeandixiedean Posts: 2,417
    AnneJGP said:

    kle4 said:

    kle4 said:

    All this “drip drip” of resignations will do is demonstrate to voters that the Tories are a bunch of in-fighting self indulgent navel gazers. But I guess it’s easier than actually coming up with an alternative plan....

    In fairness various of those resigning may have an alternative plan. What they don't necessarily have is the same plan, and what they definitely don't have is the support within the parliamentary party or parliament generally to carry out said plans.

    Now, if they cannot support the nearest thing that exists to a plan which does carry that support then they should resign, and they have to decide if they can live with a plan they cannot support possible going ahead. The MPs might decide they can on the anti-Corbyn principle of people being willing to moan endlessly about something but still back it, but some of their voters won't.

    In the meantime the ball is in the EU's court, and they will still assume they can get more.
    The ball is not in the EU’s court.

    Firstly the White Paper has not yet been published.

    Secondly Brexit is not like a game of tennis.
    You object to people using metaphors? I think that's sanctimonious nonsense, and I certainly won't stop doing it, and in fact will use them more if people get uppity about people making less than literal comparisons in aid of explanation (Shockingly, I am aware Brexit is not a game of Tennis), or indeed simply make use of standard expressions. You've never utilised an expression which was not a literal comparison? Pull the other one.

    And if you merely object to the suitability of the metaphor and not the use of metaphor itself, I would content it is in their court because no matter what the White Paper contains, the EU's response will be key. The ball is over the net, though how it reacts when it bounces mean the details are not certain yet.

    Moreover, even if it is not a great comparison, it was just an expression and the point was clear - what we do next is heavily reliant on what they do next.
    The UK will have to serve up the White Paper before the ball can be in the EU's court - and it's always possible it could hit the net or be out.
    Why is the EU waiting for the White Paper before responding, this time? On previous occasions they've rubbished what was said only moments after Mrs May stopped speaking.
    Because this time it is a reasonably cogent set of proposals, rather than slogans and platitudes?
  • rcs1000rcs1000 Posts: 23,038
    HYUFD said:

    London as a global city is competing more with New York, Paris, LA and Tokyo in terms of property buyer and hence price than UK regional cities like Birmingham, Manchester, Cardiff and Edinburgh

    Well yes, I addressed that in the video
  • Philip_ThompsonPhilip_Thompson Posts: 14,543
    dixiedean said:

    Because this time it is a reasonably cogent set of proposals, rather than slogans and platitudes?

    No.

    They've always responded a couple of days later but this time the rebellion and exit of Brexiteers before the next working day indicates that the EU has maybe pushed the UK as far as they can.

    If the Brexiteers had rolled over easily on this the EU again would have responded along the lines of "progress but still wanting to have cake and eat it, more work needed."
  • TheScreamingEaglesTheScreamingEagles Posts: 68,320
    I'd rather lose to Croatia in the semis than lose to the Cheese-eating Surrender Monkeys in the final.
  • Big_G_NorthWalesBig_G_NorthWales Posts: 16,047

    dixiedean said:

    Because this time it is a reasonably cogent set of proposals, rather than slogans and platitudes?

    No.

    They've always responded a couple of days later but this time the rebellion and exit of Brexiteers before the next working day indicates that the EU has maybe pushed the UK as far as they can.

    If the Brexiteers had rolled over easily on this the EU again would have responded along the lines of "progress but still wanting to have cake and eat it, more work needed."
    Could be some truth in that. It is obvious this is as far as TM can go
  • dixiedeandixiedean Posts: 2,417

    dixiedean said:

    Because this time it is a reasonably cogent set of proposals, rather than slogans and platitudes?

    No.

    They've always responded a couple of days later but this time the rebellion and exit of Brexiteers before the next working day indicates that the EU has maybe pushed the UK as far as they can.

    If the Brexiteers had rolled over easily on this the EU again would have responded along the lines of "progress but still wanting to have cake and eat it, more work needed."
    All I've heard is the EU asking us what we want. Now we have said.
  • FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 29,807
    Horizon have an episode that might interest some politicians at 9pm....how to build a time machine.
  • williamglennwilliamglenn Posts: 21,552

    dixiedean said:

    Because this time it is a reasonably cogent set of proposals, rather than slogans and platitudes?

    No.

    They've always responded a couple of days later but this time the rebellion and exit of Brexiteers before the next working day indicates that the EU has maybe pushed the UK as far as they can.

    If the Brexiteers had rolled over easily on this the EU again would have responded along the lines of "progress but still wanting to have cake and eat it, more work needed."
    No, dixiedean is right. The Chequers proposal is the first time we've presented a complete outline of the future relationship we want. The first time we've specified that we want an Association Agreement and what we want to be included in it.

    May isn't proposing this on a wing and a prayer.
  • Big_G_NorthWalesBig_G_NorthWales Posts: 16,047

    I'd rather lose to Croatia in the semis than lose to the Cheese-eating Surrender Monkeys in the final.

    I wouldn't
  • CharlesCharles Posts: 20,196
    One point you don’t factor in when considering regional premia is the relative attractiveness.

    If you consider that London has become a more attractive place relative to the West Midlands to live over the last 10 years (eg better restaurants, better pollution, fewer Leave voters, whatever) then there is no reason why the relative premise should remain constant
  • MaxPBMaxPB Posts: 15,478

    I'd rather lose to Croatia in the semis than lose to the Cheese-eating Surrender Monkeys in the final.

    Nah, we have to have a go. Finals are such a crap shoot.
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 32,798

    dixiedean said:

    Because this time it is a reasonably cogent set of proposals, rather than slogans and platitudes?

    No.

    They've always responded a couple of days later but this time the rebellion and exit of Brexiteers before the next working day indicates that the EU has maybe pushed the UK as far as they can.

    If the Brexiteers had rolled over easily on this the EU again would have responded along the lines of "progress but still wanting to have cake and eat it, more work needed."
    Could be some truth in that. It is obvious this is as far as TM can go
    It is no bluff from May, that much is clear. Whether the EU was bluffing on how tough its red lines were remains to be seen, but it would be far from surprising if they said they could not go with our proposal, even if they could work with it a little bit. Heroic wording fudges conceivable could get them there, but might still be too much more for May to make work given her position, as so many would understandably be unsatisfied (and not only the unsatisfiable).
  • Big_G_NorthWalesBig_G_NorthWales Posts: 16,047
    kle4 said:

    dixiedean said:

    Because this time it is a reasonably cogent set of proposals, rather than slogans and platitudes?

    No.

    They've always responded a couple of days later but this time the rebellion and exit of Brexiteers before the next working day indicates that the EU has maybe pushed the UK as far as they can.

    If the Brexiteers had rolled over easily on this the EU again would have responded along the lines of "progress but still wanting to have cake and eat it, more work needed."
    Could be some truth in that. It is obvious this is as far as TM can go
    It is no bluff from May, that much is clear. Whether the EU was bluffing on how tough its red lines were remains to be seen, but it would be far from surprising if they said they could not go with our proposal, even if they could work with it a little bit. Heroic wording fudges conceivable could get them there, but might still be too much more for May to make work given her position, as so many would understandably be unsatisfied (and not only the unsatisfiable).
    And then it is to a no deal, sadly
  • williamglennwilliamglenn Posts: 21,552
    kle4 said:

    dixiedean said:

    Because this time it is a reasonably cogent set of proposals, rather than slogans and platitudes?

    No.

    They've always responded a couple of days later but this time the rebellion and exit of Brexiteers before the next working day indicates that the EU has maybe pushed the UK as far as they can.

    If the Brexiteers had rolled over easily on this the EU again would have responded along the lines of "progress but still wanting to have cake and eat it, more work needed."
    Could be some truth in that. It is obvious this is as far as TM can go
    It is no bluff from May, that much is clear. Whether the EU was bluffing on how tough its red lines were remains to be seen, but it would be far from surprising if they said they could not go with our proposal, even if they could work with it a little bit. Heroic wording fudges conceivable could get them there, but might still be too much more for May to make work given her position, as so many would understandably be unsatisfied (and not only the unsatisfiable).
    One clear sign that May is serious (and the reason that some Brexiteers are worried) is that this proposal is pre-fudged to allow the EU to punt some issues into the future negotiations once we've left.
  • another_richardanother_richard Posts: 11,671
    edited July 10
    Big G

    You made this comment two threads back which rather astounded me:


    I see that immigration is becoming much more palatable and that must have to do with the daily reports of the NHS loosing staff because of the Brexit uncertainty and the fact we need 100,000 more NHS workers now. That could in time play more to immigration becoming less of an issue, but only as long as it can be seen to be controlled.

    What are these daily reports of the NHS losing staff ?

    Can you link to some of these reports because I'm jut googled it and can't see anything.

    Is this something specific to North Wales or Wales generally ?

    According to the ONS employment in the NHS is at its highest level ever.

    Page 4.1 in the spreadsheet available here:

    https://www.ons.gov.uk/employmentandlabourmarket/peopleinwork/employmentandemployeetypes/datasets/summaryoflabourmarketstatistics
  • FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 29,807
    edited July 10
    Unless something changes soon this semi final will be forgotten faster than a Kim Jong may conference speech.
  • HYUFDHYUFD Posts: 44,886
    edited July 10
    kle4 said:

    dixiedean said:

    Because this time it is a reasonably cogent set of proposals, rather than slogans and platitudes?

    No.

    They've always responded a couple of days later but this time the rebellion and exit of Brexiteers before the next working day indicates that the EU has maybe pushed the UK as far as they can.

    If the Brexiteers had rolled over easily on this the EU again would have responded along the lines of "progress but still wanting to have cake and eat it, more work needed."
    Could be some truth in that. It is obvious this is as far as TM can go
    It is no bluff from May, that much is clear. Whether the EU was bluffing on how tough its red lines were remains to be seen, but it would be far from surprising if they said they could not go with our proposal, even if they could work with it a little bit. Heroic wording fudges conceivable could get them there, but might still be too much more for May to make work given her position, as so many would understandably be unsatisfied (and not only the unsatisfiable).
    The EU will probably say May has done enough for the transition period deal but not enough for a FTA which will have to be worked on during the transition which they will probably extend and extend keeping us in the EU in most respects without any power to decide anything
  • another_richardanother_richard Posts: 11,671

    I'd rather lose to Croatia in the semis than lose to the Cheese-eating Surrender Monkeys in the final.

    I wouldn't give England much chance against the French.

    But there's always luck.
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 32,798

    kle4 said:

    dixiedean said:

    Because this time it is a reasonably cogent set of proposals, rather than slogans and platitudes?

    No.

    They've always responded a couple of days later but this time the rebellion and exit of Brexiteers before the next working day indicates that the EU has maybe pushed the UK as far as they can.

    If the Brexiteers had rolled over easily on this the EU again would have responded along the lines of "progress but still wanting to have cake and eat it, more work needed."
    Could be some truth in that. It is obvious this is as far as TM can go
    It is no bluff from May, that much is clear. Whether the EU was bluffing on how tough its red lines were remains to be seen, but it would be far from surprising if they said they could not go with our proposal, even if they could work with it a little bit. Heroic wording fudges conceivable could get them there, but might still be too much more for May to make work given her position, as so many would understandably be unsatisfied (and not only the unsatisfiable).
    And then it is to a no deal, sadly
    Seems likely. I'm not sure pre-fudging our offer as william suggests has happened gets it over the line, as even if 80% is agreed, the last 20% is always the most significant I'd wager, and surely the EU will feel the need to demand more.
  • HYUFDHYUFD Posts: 44,886
    edited July 10
    rcs1000 said:

    HYUFD said:

    London as a global city is competing more with New York, Paris, LA and Tokyo in terms of property buyer and hence price than UK regional cities like Birmingham, Manchester, Cardiff and Edinburgh

    Well yes, I addressed that in the video
    Sorry have been at Wimbledon watching the doubles so will watch it later, sure it was great!
This discussion has been closed.