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politicalbetting.com » Blog Archive » Tonight’s special congressional election in Ohio could be a go

SystemSystem Posts: 6,389
edited August 7 in General
imagepoliticalbetting.com » Blog Archive » Tonight’s special congressional election in Ohio could be a good pointer to November’s mid-terms

There’s a big “special” Congressional election ta1king place in Ohio’s 12th district which was won by the Republicans by 12 points in 2012 and 2016 – the former by Romney and the latter by Trump.

Read the full story here

«1345

Comments

  • Morris_DancerMorris_Dancer Posts: 45,441
    Good afternoon, everyone.

    Too tight for me, but best of luck to those who partake.
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 12,646
    edited August 7
    It is actually quite funny that @TSE has managed to get a first - but it was on a phantom thread.

    I imagine that Morris Dancer will be lectured on the merits of Julius Caesar for the next five years for stealing his thunder!
  • Philip_ThompsonPhilip_Thompson Posts: 14,950
    Are both parties odds on?
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 12,646
    FPT:
    currystar said:

    DavidL said:

    Danny565 said:

    To be fair to Boris (not a sentence I thought I'd say), I think his burqa comments fall into the "juvenile and stupid" category more than they do "racist". After all, it's not like a comparison to a letterbox is a commonly racist trope to my knowledge (though the comparison to a bank-robber is more questionable).

    That said, I can't help but notice there's some PBers who've been very silent on this topic, who I'm 100% convinced would've been in paroxysms of outrage if a Labour activist had been discovered to have tweeted some mocking comments about Orthodox Jewish dress.

    You can see Steve Bannon's approach already. Politicians will queue up to denounce Boris Johnson's remarks, only to find out time and again that the public have a much more robust view of what can be discussed. The idea is to cement Boris Johnson as the next Trump.
    I do not dispute his right to say it. It confirms my assessment of him as a man with very poor judgment, very little discipline and completely unsuited to serious office though. But then, we all know that by now anyway.
    I have to say that the Burkha is an absolutely ridiculous piece of clothing and if women are forced to wear it then I consider that wrong.
    On the other hand, when I have fourteen year old girls coming to me in tears because someone has shouted sexual abuse at them and threatened to rape them in the street, I do start to understand why there are indeed women out there who prefer to look like a moving pillar box.

    The issue is if they are forced to wear it when they don't want to.
  • Sean_FSean_F Posts: 22,825
    ydoethur said:

    It is actually quite funny that @TSE has managed to get a first - but it was on a phantom thread.

    I imagine that Morris Dancer will be lectured on the merits of Julius Caesar for the next five years for stealing his thunder!

    When you consider it, Caesar, for all his brilliance, was a failure. His once-formidable political gifts had deserted him by the end.
  • surbysurby Posts: 1,227
    Burkha or Niqab ? Nuns effectively wear the burkha . It is the Niqab where there is a slit for the eyes only.

    With the burkha you can see the whole face.
  • surbysurby Posts: 1,227
    Tonight, I hope, the celebration will be bigger than the win in Alabama.
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 12,646
    Sean_F said:

    ydoethur said:

    It is actually quite funny that @TSE has managed to get a first - but it was on a phantom thread.

    I imagine that Morris Dancer will be lectured on the merits of Julius Caesar for the next five years for stealing his thunder!

    When you consider it, Caesar, for all his brilliance, was a failure. His once-formidable political gifts had deserted him by the end.
    He had a serious Caseius of megalomania. This led to him being Brutus-ly despatched.

    That good enough to get us started?
  • Sunil_PrasannanSunil_Prasannan Posts: 27,560
    surby said:

    Burkha or Niqab ? Nuns effectively wear the burkha . It is the Niqab where there is a slit for the eyes only.

    With the burkha you can see the whole face.

    "Get your face out for the lads!"
  • DavidLDavidL Posts: 22,337
    ydoethur said:

    FPT:

    currystar said:

    DavidL said:

    Danny565 said:

    To be fair to Boris (not a sentence I thought I'd say), I think his burqa comments fall into the "juvenile and stupid" category more than they do "racist". After all, it's not like a comparison to a letterbox is a commonly racist trope to my knowledge (though the comparison to a bank-robber is more questionable).

    That said, I can't help but notice there's some PBers who've been very silent on this topic, who I'm 100% convinced would've been in paroxysms of outrage if a Labour activist had been discovered to have tweeted some mocking comments about Orthodox Jewish dress.

    You can see Steve Bannon's approach already. Politicians will queue up to denounce Boris Johnson's remarks, only to find out time and again that the public have a much more robust view of what can be discussed. The idea is to cement Boris Johnson as the next Trump.
    I do not dispute his right to say it. It confirms my assessment of him as a man with very poor judgment, very little discipline and completely unsuited to serious office though. But then, we all know that by now anyway.
    I have to say that the Burkha is an absolutely ridiculous piece of clothing and if women are forced to wear it then I consider that wrong.
    On the other hand, when I have fourteen year old girls coming to me in tears because someone has shouted sexual abuse at them and threatened to rape them in the street, I do start to understand why there are indeed women out there who prefer to look like a moving pillar box.

    The issue is if they are forced to wear it when they don't want to.
    As a generality I agree with @currystar but how you determine in any individual case whether they are being compelled to wear it or chose to wear it is not obvious. I fear that we tolerate far too much "patriarchal" behaviour in parts of our society for cultural reasons and do not give many of these women the sort of support they are entitled to expect in a society nominally committed to equality.
  • Morris_DancerMorris_Dancer Posts: 45,441
    Mr. Doethur, like Caesar at Gergovia, I fear Mr. Eagles got a bit over-excited and made an error of judgement.
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 12,646
    surby said:

    Burkha or Niqab ? Nuns effectively wear the burkha . It is the Niqab where there is a slit for the eyes only.

    With the burkha you can see the whole face.

    No, the burka is the overall body suit with gauze over the eyes. The niqab is a facecloth.

    I think you're confusing that with the Hijab, which does indeed look like a nun's wimple.
  • Sunil_PrasannanSunil_Prasannan Posts: 27,560
    edited August 7
    DavidL said:

    ydoethur said:

    FPT:

    currystar said:

    DavidL said:

    Danny565 said:

    To be fair to Boris (not a sentence I thought I'd say), I think his burqa comments fall into the "juvenile and stupid" category more than they do "racist". After all, it's not like a comparison to a letterbox is a commonly racist trope to my knowledge (though the comparison to a bank-robber is more questionable).

    That said, I can't help but notice there's some PBers who've been very silent on this topic, who I'm 100% convinced would've been in paroxysms of outrage if a Labour activist had been discovered to have tweeted some mocking comments about Orthodox Jewish dress.

    You can see Steve Bannon's approach already. Politicians will queue up to denounce Boris Johnson's remarks, only to find out time and again that the public have a much more robust view of what can be discussed. The idea is to cement Boris Johnson as the next Trump.
    I do not dispute his right to say it. It confirms my assessment of him as a man with very poor judgment, very little discipline and completely unsuited to serious office though. But then, we all know that by now anyway.
    I have to say that the Burkha is an absolutely ridiculous piece of clothing and if women are forced to wear it then I consider that wrong.
    On the other hand, when I have fourteen year old girls coming to me in tears because someone has shouted sexual abuse at them and threatened to rape them in the street, I do start to understand why there are indeed women out there who prefer to look like a moving pillar box.

    The issue is if they are forced to wear it when they don't want to.
    As a generality I agree with @currystar but how you determine in any individual case whether they are being compelled to wear it or chose to wear it is not obvious. I fear that we tolerate far too much "patriarchal" behaviour in parts of our society for cultural reasons and do not give many of these women the sort of support they are entitled to expect in a society nominally committed to equality.
    One could argue that burqas are unislamic. After all, Allah (SWT), in His Infinite Wisdom, created us such that we are born stark-raving naked :lol:
  • PulpstarPulpstar Posts: 46,067
    'Ali brandishing a bottle' - Here's the inside edge that'll probably save Stokes.
  • Sean_FSean_F Posts: 22,825
    ydoethur said:

    surby said:

    Burkha or Niqab ? Nuns effectively wear the burkha . It is the Niqab where there is a slit for the eyes only.

    With the burkha you can see the whole face.

    No, the burka is the overall body suit with gauze over the eyes. The niqab is a facecloth.

    I think you're confusing that with the Hijab, which does indeed look like a nun's wimple.
    In this hot weather, a burka must get rather smelly.
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 12,646
    Sean_F said:

    ydoethur said:

    surby said:

    Burkha or Niqab ? Nuns effectively wear the burkha . It is the Niqab where there is a slit for the eyes only.

    With the burkha you can see the whole face.

    No, the burka is the overall body suit with gauze over the eyes. The niqab is a facecloth.

    I think you're confusing that with the Hijab, which does indeed look like a nun's wimple.
    In this hot weather, a burka must get rather smelly.
    If it's light-coloured it might reflect heat and reduce sweating.
  • Philip_ThompsonPhilip_Thompson Posts: 14,950
    FPT
    Anorak said:

    That's precisely what many in "the greatest generation" did. They sacrificed their lives to ensure we could be a free democracy.

    I'm not prepared to throw away their sacrifice on the altar of potentially avoiding a one off recession.

    So yes. Democracy and freedom are worth the loss of life. A recession is not.

    Mental and utterly unspoofable.
    So you are prepared to sacrifice democracy if it comes to it to avoid a small recession?

    Or you don't consider democracy worth the sacrifices our ancestors fought for?
  • Sean_FSean_F Posts: 22,825
    ydoethur said:

    Sean_F said:

    ydoethur said:

    surby said:

    Burkha or Niqab ? Nuns effectively wear the burkha . It is the Niqab where there is a slit for the eyes only.

    With the burkha you can see the whole face.

    No, the burka is the overall body suit with gauze over the eyes. The niqab is a facecloth.

    I think you're confusing that with the Hijab, which does indeed look like a nun's wimple.
    In this hot weather, a burka must get rather smelly.
    If it's light-coloured it might reflect heat and reduce sweating.
    The only ones I see in Luton are jet black.
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 12,646
    Sean_F said:

    ydoethur said:

    Sean_F said:

    ydoethur said:

    surby said:

    Burkha or Niqab ? Nuns effectively wear the burkha . It is the Niqab where there is a slit for the eyes only.

    With the burkha you can see the whole face.

    No, the burka is the overall body suit with gauze over the eyes. The niqab is a facecloth.

    I think you're confusing that with the Hijab, which does indeed look like a nun's wimple.
    In this hot weather, a burka must get rather smelly.
    If it's light-coloured it might reflect heat and reduce sweating.
    The only ones I see in Luton are jet black.
    Are those burkas or niqabs?

    Afghanistan traditionally they are light blue or white. That's not however conclusive.
  • ydoethur said:

    It is actually quite funny that @TSE has managed to get a first - but it was on a phantom thread.

    I imagine that Morris Dancer will be lectured on the merits of Julius Caesar for the next five years for stealing his thunder!

    I’ve got a thread coming up comparing Corbyn to Hannibal.
  • DavidLDavidL Posts: 22,337
    Pulpstar said:

    'Ali brandishing a bottle' - Here's the inside edge that'll probably save Stokes.

    Even on the Crown's version of events both of the co-accused seem to have got weapons at different points. I suspect that is why this is affray rather than GBH.
  • williamglennwilliamglenn Posts: 22,080

    FPT

    Anorak said:

    That's precisely what many in "the greatest generation" did. They sacrificed their lives to ensure we could be a free democracy.

    I'm not prepared to throw away their sacrifice on the altar of potentially avoiding a one off recession.

    So yes. Democracy and freedom are worth the loss of life. A recession is not.

    Mental and utterly unspoofable.
    So you are prepared to sacrifice democracy if it comes to it to avoid a small recession?

    Or you don't consider democracy worth the sacrifices our ancestors fought for?
    If you impose a recession against the will of the people at the time you're imposing it, in what sense are you doing it in the name of democracy?
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 12,646

    ydoethur said:

    It is actually quite funny that @TSE has managed to get a first - but it was on a phantom thread.

    I imagine that Morris Dancer will be lectured on the merits of Julius Caesar for the next five years for stealing his thunder!

    I’ve got a thread coming up comparing Corbyn to Hannibal.
    Now that's what I CALL trolling!

    Do you make the comparison with elephantine tact?
  • AnorakAnorak Posts: 5,054

    FPT

    Anorak said:

    That's precisely what many in "the greatest generation" did. They sacrificed their lives to ensure we could be a free democracy.

    I'm not prepared to throw away their sacrifice on the altar of potentially avoiding a one off recession.

    So yes. Democracy and freedom are worth the loss of life. A recession is not.

    Mental and utterly unspoofable.
    So you are prepared to sacrifice democracy if it comes to it to avoid a small recession?

    Or you don't consider democracy worth the sacrifices our ancestors fought for?
    I disagree that democracy would be sacrificed.

    To be more nuanced: if membership of the EU reduces the value of my vote to a small degree (which I would contend) then the benefits would far, far outweigh that loss.
  • Sunil_PrasannanSunil_Prasannan Posts: 27,560

    ydoethur said:

    It is actually quite funny that @TSE has managed to get a first - but it was on a phantom thread.

    I imagine that Morris Dancer will be lectured on the merits of Julius Caesar for the next five years for stealing his thunder!

    I’ve got a thread coming up comparing Corbyn to Hannibal.
    Hannibal? Not B.A. Barracus??
  • surbysurby Posts: 1,227

    surby said:

    Burkha or Niqab ? Nuns effectively wear the burkha . It is the Niqab where there is a slit for the eyes only.

    With the burkha you can see the whole face.

    "Get your face out for the lads!"
    Maybe they want to stay from you.
  • SlackbladderSlackbladder Posts: 6,338

    ydoethur said:

    It is actually quite funny that @TSE has managed to get a first - but it was on a phantom thread.

    I imagine that Morris Dancer will be lectured on the merits of Julius Caesar for the next five years for stealing his thunder!

    I’ve got a thread coming up comparing Corbyn to Hannibal.
    Hannibal? Not B.A. Barracus??
    Corbyn is 'Howling Mad' Murdock.
  • Sean_FSean_F Posts: 22,825
    surby said:
    It's certainly not the right time to be considering a ban on the consumption of dogs.
  • Sunil_PrasannanSunil_Prasannan Posts: 27,560
    Of course, Alexander ventured as far east as India, somewhere neither Caesar nor Hannibal reached.
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 12,646
    surby said:
    It should be noted that they were Remainers:

    https://www.nfuonline.com/news/brexit-news/eu-referendum-news/nfu-council-agrees-resolution-on-the-eu-referendum/

    It should also be noted that their not terribly scientific polling indicated 52% remain, 26% leave and 22% uncertain in EUROPE membership in November 2015, and although that dipped by March most had gone to 'undecided.'

    https://www.nfuonline.com/news/brexit-news/eu-referendum-news/nfu-survey-of-members-on-eu-referendum/

    A lot of farmers have been kept solvent through EU environmental subsidies and tariff barriers to cheap food. The NFU will certainly want to keep us in the customs union if at all possible.
  • surbysurby Posts: 1,227
    DavidL said:

    ydoethur said:

    FPT:

    currystar said:

    DavidL said:

    Danny565 said:

    To be fair to Boris (not a sentence I thought I'd say), I think his burqa comments fall into the "juvenile and stupid" category more than they do "racist". After all, it's not like a comparison to a letterbox is a commonly racist trope to my knowledge (though the comparison to a bank-robber is more questionable).

    That said, I can't help but notice there's some PBers who've been very silent on this topic, who I'm 100% convinced would've been in paroxysms of outrage if a Labour activist had been discovered to have tweeted some mocking comments about Orthodox Jewish dress.

    You can see Steve Bannon's approach already. Politicians will queue up to denounce Boris Johnson's remarks, only to find out time and again that the public have a much more robust view of what can be discussed. The idea is to cement Boris Johnson as the next Trump.
    I do not dispute his right to say it. It confirms my assessment of him as a man with very poor judgment, very little discipline and completely unsuited to serious office though. But then, we all know that by now anyway.
    I have to say that the Burkha is an absolutely ridiculous piece of clothing and if women are forced to wear it then I consider that wrong.
    On the other hand, when I have fourteen year old girls coming to me in tears because someone has shouted sexual abuse at them and threatened to rape them in the street, I do start to understand why there are indeed women out there who prefer to look like a moving pillar box.

    The issue is if they are forced to wear it when they don't want to.
    As a generality I agree with @currystar but how you determine in any individual case whether they are being compelled to wear it or chose to wear it is not obvious. I fear that we tolerate far too much "patriarchal" behaviour in parts of our society for cultural reasons and do not give many of these women the sort of support they are entitled to expect in a society nominally committed to equality.
    There is an assumption taht men force women to wear it. In some cases, it could be true. But, in all religions, the women tend to be more "traditional" rule followers.

    I have seen with my Jewish friends that they would eat anything. Once the first child comes along, the kitchen becomes kosher. The men mostly go with the flow.
  • surbysurby Posts: 1,227
    DavidL said:

    ydoethur said:

    FPT:

    currystar said:

    DavidL said:

    Danny565 said:

    To be fair to Boris (not a sentence I thought I'd say), I think his burqa comments fall into the "juvenile and stupid" category more than they do "racist". After all, it's not like a comparison to a letterbox is a commonly racist trope to my knowledge (though the comparison to a bank-robber is more questionable).

    That said, I can't help but notice there's some PBers who've been very silent on this topic, who I'm 100% convinced would've been in paroxysms of outrage if a Labour activist had been discovered to have tweeted some mocking comments about Orthodox Jewish dress.

    You can see Steve Bannon's approach already. Politicians will queue up to denounce Boris Johnson's remarks, only to find out time and again that the public have a much more robust view of what can be discussed. The idea is to cement Boris Johnson as the next Trump.
    I do not dispute his right to say it. It confirms my assessment of him as a man with very poor judgment, very little discipline and completely unsuited to serious office though. But then, we all know that by now anyway.
    I have to say that the Burkha is an absolutely ridiculous piece of clothing and if women are forced to wear it then I consider that wrong.
    On the other hand, when I have fourteen year old girls coming to me in tears because someone has shouted sexual abuse at them and threatened to rape them in the street, I do start to understand why there are indeed women out there who prefer to look like a moving pillar box.

    The issue is if they are forced to wear it when they don't want to.
    As a generality I agree with @currystar but how you determine in any individual case whether they are being compelled to wear it or chose to wear it is not obvious. I fear that we tolerate far too much "patriarchal" behaviour in parts of our society for cultural reasons and do not give many of these women the sort of support they are entitled to expect in a society nominally committed to equality.
    There is an assumption that men force women to wear it. In some cases, it could be true. But, in all religions, the women tend to be more "traditional" rule followers.

    I have seen with my Jewish friends that they would eat anything. Once the first child comes along, the kitchen becomes kosher. The men mostly go with the flow.
  • ydoethur said:

    ydoethur said:

    It is actually quite funny that @TSE has managed to get a first - but it was on a phantom thread.

    I imagine that Morris Dancer will be lectured on the merits of Julius Caesar for the next five years for stealing his thunder!

    I’ve got a thread coming up comparing Corbyn to Hannibal.
    Now that's what I CALL trolling!

    Do you make the comparison with elephantine tact?
    Nope.

    It’s more a wider Second Punic War Thread
  • Sean_FSean_F Posts: 22,825
    edited August 7
    ydoethur said:

    surby said:
    It should be noted that they were Remainers:

    https://www.nfuonline.com/news/brexit-news/eu-referendum-news/nfu-council-agrees-resolution-on-the-eu-referendum/

    It should also be noted that their not terribly scientific polling indicated 52% remain, 26% leave and 22% uncertain in EUROPE membership in November 2015, and although that dipped by March most had gone to 'undecided.'

    https://www.nfuonline.com/news/brexit-news/eu-referendum-news/nfu-survey-of-members-on-eu-referendum/

    A lot of farmers have been kept solvent through EU environmental subsidies and tariff barriers to cheap food. The NFU will certainly want to keep us in the customs union if at all possible.
    I'd have thought a food shortage would be a licence to print money for farmers.


  • Morris_DancerMorris_Dancer Posts: 45,441
    Dr. Prasannan, in defence of Caesar and Hannibal, neither of them wanted to go to India.

    Mr. Eagles, *sighs* One day you may learn... we can but hope.
  • grabcocquegrabcocque Posts: 1,060
    surby said:


    I have seen with my Jewish friends that they would eat anything. Once the first child comes along, the kitchen becomes kosher. The men mostly go with the flow.

    All of my Jewish friends eat pork.

    None of them want their mothers to know this.
  • PulpstarPulpstar Posts: 46,067
    Stokes "Not guilty", calling it now.
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 12,646

    ydoethur said:

    ydoethur said:

    It is actually quite funny that @TSE has managed to get a first - but it was on a phantom thread.

    I imagine that Morris Dancer will be lectured on the merits of Julius Caesar for the next five years for stealing his thunder!

    I’ve got a thread coming up comparing Corbyn to Hannibal.
    Now that's what I CALL trolling!

    Do you make the comparison with elephantine tact?
    Nope.

    It’s more a wider Second Punic War Thread
    A long march to the East, overcoming many hostile tribes and difficult terrain, wins a few spectacular battles but due to passivity ultimately loses the war and everything else?

    I suppose it could work.
  • TOPPINGTOPPING Posts: 14,795
    surby said:
    tbf all the farmers I know voted Remain and not only because of the subsidies. They realised the disruption Brexit might cause.
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 12,646
    edited August 7
    Sean_F said:

    ydoethur said:

    surby said:
    It should be noted that they were Remainers:

    https://www.nfuonline.com/news/brexit-news/eu-referendum-news/nfu-council-agrees-resolution-on-the-eu-referendum/

    It should also be noted that their not terribly scientific polling indicated 52% remain, 26% leave and 22% uncertain in EUROPE membership in November 2015, and although that dipped by March most had gone to 'undecided.'

    https://www.nfuonline.com/news/brexit-news/eu-referendum-news/nfu-survey-of-members-on-eu-referendum/

    A lot of farmers have been kept solvent through EU environmental subsidies and tariff barriers to cheap food. The NFU will certainly want to keep us in the customs union if at all possible.
    I'd have thought a food shortage would be a licence to print money for farmers.
    Not if (1) they can't grow enough food to meet demand, at which point not only do they not gain from it but thefts become a psossibility;

    (2) if the Government suspends import restrictions to deal with it.
  • DecrepitJohnLDecrepitJohnL Posts: 9,287
    ydoethur said:

    Sean_F said:

    ydoethur said:

    surby said:

    Burkha or Niqab ? Nuns effectively wear the burkha . It is the Niqab where there is a slit for the eyes only.

    With the burkha you can see the whole face.

    No, the burka is the overall body suit with gauze over the eyes. The niqab is a facecloth.

    I think you're confusing that with the Hijab, which does indeed look like a nun's wimple.
    In this hot weather, a burka must get rather smelly.
    If it's light-coloured it might reflect heat and reduce sweating.
    I vaguely recall that black works by air currents but have no time to research it.
  • RoyalBlueRoyalBlue Posts: 2,582
    Sean_F said:

    ydoethur said:

    surby said:
    It should be noted that they were Remainers:

    https://www.nfuonline.com/news/brexit-news/eu-referendum-news/nfu-council-agrees-resolution-on-the-eu-referendum/

    It should also be noted that their not terribly scientific polling indicated 52% remain, 26% leave and 22% uncertain in EUROPE membership in November 2015, and although that dipped by March most had gone to 'undecided.'

    https://www.nfuonline.com/news/brexit-news/eu-referendum-news/nfu-survey-of-members-on-eu-referendum/

    A lot of farmers have been kept solvent through EU environmental subsidies and tariff barriers to cheap food. The NFU will certainly want to keep us in the customs union if at all possible.
    I'd have thought a food shortage would be a licence to print money for farmers.


    That will be true until collectivisation is completed and the richer ones have atoned for their bourgeois asset accumulation.
  • grabcocquegrabcocque Posts: 1,060
    ydoethur said:


    Not if (1) they can't grow enough food to meet demand, at which point not only do they not gain from it but thefts become a psossibility;

    (2) if the Government suspends import restrictions to deal with it.

    Plus they'll get the blame for it. For not growing enough food. Farmers: traitors and enemy of the people of Brexitania.
  • SquareRootSquareRoot Posts: 5,743
    Pulpstar said:

    Stokes "Not guilty", calling it now.

    why
  • AlastairMeeksAlastairMeeks Posts: 21,328
    Jeremy Corbyn is more reminiscent of Julian the Apostate. A man of inflexible and long-held beliefs, vainly trying to resurrect a dead religion, he attracts curiosity, achieves considerable success in battle, before eventually falling victim to his own injudicious decisions about the near East.
  • Tissue_PriceTissue_Price Posts: 7,846

    ydoethur said:

    It is actually quite funny that @TSE has managed to get a first - but it was on a phantom thread.

    I imagine that Morris Dancer will be lectured on the merits of Julius Caesar for the next five years for stealing his thunder!

    I’ve got a thread coming up comparing Corbyn to Hannibal.
    "I've been in this room for eight years now, Clarice. I know they will never, ever let me out while I'm alive. What I want is a view. I want a window where I can see a tree, or even water. I want to be in a federal institution."
  • williamglennwilliamglenn Posts: 22,080

    Jeremy Corbyn is more reminiscent of Julian the Apostate. A man of inflexible and long-held beliefs, vainly trying to resurrect a dead religion, he attracts curiosity, achieves considerable success in battle, before eventually falling victim to his own injudicious decisions about the near East.

    Not a bad likeness either.

    image
  • PulpstarPulpstar Posts: 46,067

    Pulpstar said:

    Stokes "Not guilty", calling it now.

    why
    Unless I'm misinterpreting (Which I may well be) seem the two he's duffed up were threatening with bottles.
  • Hmmm

    Ryan Hale’s barrister Stephen Murray now back on his feet with more questions for DC Adams. Asks about Alex Hales - does DC Adams think he can be seen kicking a man in the head? Yes, says DC Adams. “Mr Stoke’s colleague has stamped down of Ryan Ali and kicked him.” Adams agrees
  • AnorakAnorak Posts: 5,054

    Pulpstar said:

    Stokes "Not guilty", calling it now.

    why
    Is there a market on this? Are you allowed to gamble on the outcome of criminal cases?
  • A mistrial should be declared in this trial.

    It is all so confusing with Hale's and Hales involved.
  • PulpstarPulpstar Posts: 46,067
    edited August 7
    Anorak said:

    Pulpstar said:

    Stokes "Not guilty", calling it now.

    why
    Is there a market on this? Are you allowed to gamble on the outcome of criminal cases?
    Although obviously not the most important fact, Judge Massipa's incompetence cost me a couple of quid on Oscar Pistorius' trial. Paddy ran that one as a promo of sorts though so it was a bet to no loss.
  • AlastairMeeksAlastairMeeks Posts: 21,328

    A mistrial should be declared in this trial.

    It is all so confusing with Hale's and Hales involved.

    Just be grateful Russell Harty isn't involved.
  • williamglennwilliamglenn Posts: 22,080

    A mistrial should be declared in this trial.

    It is all so confusing with Hale's and Hales involved.

    They should have got Baroness Hale to be the judge.
  • David_EvershedDavid_Evershed Posts: 5,618
    Sean_F said:

    ydoethur said:

    surby said:

    Burkha or Niqab ? Nuns effectively wear the burkha . It is the Niqab where there is a slit for the eyes only.

    With the burkha you can see the whole face.

    No, the burka is the overall body suit with gauze over the eyes. The niqab is a facecloth.

    I think you're confusing that with the Hijab, which does indeed look like a nun's wimple.
    In this hot weather, a burka must get rather smelly.
    But aren't they all naked beneath - or is that just my imagination.
  • A mistrial should be declared in this trial.

    It is all so confusing with Hale's and Hales involved.

    Just be grateful Russell Harty isn't involved.
    Or Moeen Ali.
  • ydoethur said:

    It is actually quite funny that @TSE has managed to get a first - but it was on a phantom thread.

    I imagine that Morris Dancer will be lectured on the merits of Julius Caesar for the next five years for stealing his thunder!

    I’ve got a thread coming up comparing Corbyn to Hannibal.
    "I've been in this room for eight years now, Clarice. I know they will never, ever let me out while I'm alive. What I want is a view. I want a window where I can see a tree, or even water. I want to be in a federal institution."
    Ha.
  • DavidLDavidL Posts: 22,337
    surby said:

    DavidL said:

    ydoethur said:

    FPT:

    currystar said:

    DavidL said:

    Danny565 said:

    To be fair to Boris (not a sentence I thought I'd say), I think his burqa comments fall into the "juvenile and stupid" category more than they do "racist". After all, it's not like a comparison to a letterbox is a commonly racist trope to my knowledge (though the comparison to a bank-robber is more questionable).

    That said, I can't help but notice there's some PBers who've been very silent on this topic, who I'm 100% convinced would've been in paroxysms of outrage if a Labour activist had been discovered to have tweeted some mocking comments about Orthodox Jewish dress.

    You can see Steve Bannon's approach already. Politicians will queue up to denounce Boris Johnson's remarks, only to find out time and again that the public have a much more robust view of what can be discussed. The idea is to cement Boris Johnson as the next Trump.
    I do not dispute his right to say it. It confirms my assessment of him as a man with very poor judgment, very little discipline and completely unsuited to serious office though. But then, we all know that by now anyway.
    I have to say that the Burkha is an absolutely ridiculous piece of clothing and if women are forced to wear it then I consider that wrong.
    On the other hand, when I have fourteen year old girls coming to me in tears because someone has shouted sexual abuse at them and threatened to rape them in the street, I do start to understand why there are indeed women out there who prefer to look like a moving pillar box.

    The issue is if they are forced to wear it when they don't want to.
    As a generality I agree with @currystar but how you determine in any individual case whether they are being compelled to wear it or chose to wear it is not obvious. I fear that we tolerate far too much "patriarchal" behaviour in parts of our society for cultural reasons and do not give many of these women the sort of support they are entitled to expect in a society nominally committed to equality.
    There is an assumption that men force women to wear it. In some cases, it could be true. But, in all religions, the women tend to be more "traditional" rule followers.

    I have seen with my Jewish friends that they would eat anything. Once the first child comes along, the kitchen becomes kosher. The men mostly go with the flow.
    Yep, it's complicated. My next door neighbour's son married a very traditional woman from Pakistan and the effect on the broader family is quite marked in terms of clothes, habits etc. Not liked it to be honest.
  • Morris_DancerMorris_Dancer Posts: 45,441
    Mr. Doethur, passivity?

    On the part of Hanno and the Peace Party, perhaps.
  • Anorak said:

    Pulpstar said:

    Stokes "Not guilty", calling it now.

    why
    Is there a market on this? Are you allowed to gamble on the outcome of criminal cases?
    Theoretically no.

    A creative bookie may get around this, such as will Ben Stokes play in the third, fourth, or fifth tests, or in next year's world cup.

    Shadsy pulled a similar trick when Chris Huhne was in trouble, such as 'Will Chris Huhne be in the cabinet at the time of the Lib Dem conference'
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 12,646

    Mr. Doethur, passivity?

    On the part of Hanno and the Peace Party, perhaps.

    Ah, the Blairites (although Corbyn would doubtless call them the War Party)!
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 12,646

    Hmmm

    Ryan Hale’s barrister Stephen Murray now back on his feet with more questions for DC Adams. Asks about Alex Hales - does DC Adams think he can be seen kicking a man in the head? Yes, says DC Adams. “Mr Stoke’s colleague has stamped down of Ryan Ali and kicked him.” Adams agrees

    What? Then why was he not charged as well? What on earth is going on here?
  • ydoethur said:

    Hmmm

    Ryan Hale’s barrister Stephen Murray now back on his feet with more questions for DC Adams. Asks about Alex Hales - does DC Adams think he can be seen kicking a man in the head? Yes, says DC Adams. “Mr Stoke’s colleague has stamped down of Ryan Ali and kicked him.” Adams agrees

    What? Then why was he not charged as well? What on earth is going on here?
    That's what I was thinking as well.
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 12,646

    Anorak said:

    Pulpstar said:

    Stokes "Not guilty", calling it now.

    why
    Is there a market on this? Are you allowed to gamble on the outcome of criminal cases?
    Theoretically no.

    A creative bookie may get around this, such as will Ben Stokes play in the third, fourth, or fifth tests, or in next year's world cup.

    Shadsy pulled a similar trick when Chris Huhne was in trouble, such as 'Will Chris Huhne be in the cabinet at the time of the Lib Dem conference'
    I think it was John Mortimer who said a lifetime in the British criminal justice system had sated his appetite for gambling.
  • rcs1000rcs1000 Posts: 23,400
    I'm involved in my first ever Twitter spat. I'm so proud. I'm currently fighting with some chap over the Priti Patel tweet re the Penny Morduant quote about the UK being the "oldest and most successful" country in Europe.
  • DavidLDavidL Posts: 22,337
    ydoethur said:

    Hmmm

    Ryan Hale’s barrister Stephen Murray now back on his feet with more questions for DC Adams. Asks about Alex Hales - does DC Adams think he can be seen kicking a man in the head? Yes, says DC Adams. “Mr Stoke’s colleague has stamped down of Ryan Ali and kicked him.” Adams agrees

    What? Then why was he not charged as well? What on earth is going on here?
    I saw Alex Hales in a bar in an hotel where the England team were staying. Let's just say that his reported height of 6ft 5inches really doesn't do him justice. He is a giant of a man.
  • felixfelix Posts: 7,998
    ydoethur said:

    ydoethur said:

    It is actually quite funny that @TSE has managed to get a first - but it was on a phantom thread.

    I imagine that Morris Dancer will be lectured on the merits of Julius Caesar for the next five years for stealing his thunder!

    I’ve got a thread coming up comparing Corbyn to Hannibal.
    Now that's what I CALL trolling!

    Do you make the comparison with elephantine tact?
    Or maybe the thread title will have Corbyn as the 'elephant in the room'.
  • Philip_ThompsonPhilip_Thompson Posts: 14,950

    FPT

    Anorak said:

    That's precisely what many in "the greatest generation" did. They sacrificed their lives to ensure we could be a free democracy.

    I'm not prepared to throw away their sacrifice on the altar of potentially avoiding a one off recession.

    So yes. Democracy and freedom are worth the loss of life. A recession is not.

    Mental and utterly unspoofable.
    So you are prepared to sacrifice democracy if it comes to it to avoid a small recession?

    Or you don't consider democracy worth the sacrifices our ancestors fought for?
    If you impose a recession against the will of the people at the time you're imposing it, in what sense are you doing it in the name of democracy?
    Recessions aren't imposed they're something that simply happens.

    That's like saying you're imposing bad weather.
  • PulpstarPulpstar Posts: 46,067
    Alex Hales behaviour seems odd here, why would he try and apparently stop Stokes then kick a man when he's down ?
    That's disturbing.
  • ydoethurydoethur Posts: 12,646
    DavidL said:

    ydoethur said:

    Hmmm

    Ryan Hale’s barrister Stephen Murray now back on his feet with more questions for DC Adams. Asks about Alex Hales - does DC Adams think he can be seen kicking a man in the head? Yes, says DC Adams. “Mr Stoke’s colleague has stamped down of Ryan Ali and kicked him.” Adams agrees

    What? Then why was he not charged as well? What on earth is going on here?
    I saw Alex Hales in a bar in an hotel where the England team were staying. Let's just say that his reported height of 6ft 5inches really doesn't do him justice. He is a giant of a man.
    This has also been puzzling me in the reports he tried to stop Stokes and got brushed off. Really? Someone of that size and physique?

    None of this is making sense at the moment. I'm wondering if the drunk was an officer on ASC.
  • David_EvershedDavid_Evershed Posts: 5,618
    edited August 7
    rcs1000 said:

    I'm involved in my first ever Twitter spat. I'm so proud. I'm currently fighting with some chap over the Priti Patel tweet re the Penny Morduant quote about the UK being the "oldest and most successful" country in Europe.

    Isn't Vatican City the oldest and most successful country in Europe?
  • AnorakAnorak Posts: 5,054

    Theoretically no.

    A creative bookie may get around this, such as will Ben Stokes play in the third, fourth, or fifth tests, or in next year's world cup.

    Shadsy pulled a similar trick when Chris Huhne was in trouble, such as 'Will Chris Huhne be in the cabinet at the time of the Lib Dem conference'

    Cheers.
  • PulpstarPulpstar Posts: 46,067

    rcs1000 said:

    I'm involved in my first ever Twitter spat. I'm so proud. I'm currently fighting with some chap over the Priti Patel tweet re the Penny Morduant quote about the UK being the "oldest and most successful" country in Europe.

    Isn't Vatican City the oldest and most successful country in Europe?
    I thought it was San Marino.
  • David_EvershedDavid_Evershed Posts: 5,618
    DavidL said:

    ydoethur said:

    Hmmm

    Ryan Hale’s barrister Stephen Murray now back on his feet with more questions for DC Adams. Asks about Alex Hales - does DC Adams think he can be seen kicking a man in the head? Yes, says DC Adams. “Mr Stoke’s colleague has stamped down of Ryan Ali and kicked him.” Adams agrees

    What? Then why was he not charged as well? What on earth is going on here?
    I saw Alex Hales in a bar in an hotel where the England team were staying. Let's just say that his reported height of 6ft 5inches really doesn't do him justice. He is a giant of a man.
    Is Alex Hale only ever seen in bars?
  • oxfordsimonoxfordsimon Posts: 4,322

    rcs1000 said:

    I'm involved in my first ever Twitter spat. I'm so proud. I'm currently fighting with some chap over the Priti Patel tweet re the Penny Morduant quote about the UK being the "oldest and most successful" country in Europe.

    Isn't Vatican City the oldest and most successful country in Europe?
    It is a city state not a country.
  • DavidLDavidL Posts: 22,337
    ydoethur said:

    DavidL said:

    ydoethur said:

    Hmmm

    Ryan Hale’s barrister Stephen Murray now back on his feet with more questions for DC Adams. Asks about Alex Hales - does DC Adams think he can be seen kicking a man in the head? Yes, says DC Adams. “Mr Stoke’s colleague has stamped down of Ryan Ali and kicked him.” Adams agrees

    What? Then why was he not charged as well? What on earth is going on here?
    I saw Alex Hales in a bar in an hotel where the England team were staying. Let's just say that his reported height of 6ft 5inches really doesn't do him justice. He is a giant of a man.
    This has also been puzzling me in the reports he tried to stop Stokes and got brushed off. Really? Someone of that size and physique?

    None of this is making sense at the moment. I'm wondering if the drunk was an officer on ASC.
    Stokes is 6'2" but yes, that does seem odd.
  • williamglennwilliamglenn Posts: 22,080

    FPT

    Anorak said:

    That's precisely what many in "the greatest generation" did. They sacrificed their lives to ensure we could be a free democracy.

    I'm not prepared to throw away their sacrifice on the altar of potentially avoiding a one off recession.

    So yes. Democracy and freedom are worth the loss of life. A recession is not.

    Mental and utterly unspoofable.
    So you are prepared to sacrifice democracy if it comes to it to avoid a small recession?

    Or you don't consider democracy worth the sacrifices our ancestors fought for?
    If you impose a recession against the will of the people at the time you're imposing it, in what sense are you doing it in the name of democracy?
    Recessions aren't imposed they're something that simply happens.

    That's like saying you're imposing bad weather.
    In the case of a disruptive Brexit it's a choice, not an act of God.
  • Casino_RoyaleCasino_Royale Posts: 25,525
    Sean_F said:

    surby said:
    It's certainly not the right time to be considering a ban on the consumption of dogs.
    That article is estimating when the UK could run out of food if we had to be wholly self sufficient in food, which no-one is suggesting.

    That would suggest the EU could impose an absolute economic blockade on the UK’s ability to trade with it and the rest of the world way more effective than the Kriegsmarine managed in WWII.
  • DavidLDavidL Posts: 22,337
    Pulpstar said:

    Alex Hales behaviour seems odd here, why would he try and apparently stop Stokes then kick a man when he's down ?
    That's disturbing.

    Just maybe because the guy swung at him with a bottle? But yes, it is a typically confusing situation. Presumably Hales was smart enough to keep his mouth shut when interviewed.
  • David_EvershedDavid_Evershed Posts: 5,618
    edited August 7
    ydoethur said:

    DavidL said:

    ydoethur said:

    Hmmm

    Ryan Hale’s barrister Stephen Murray now back on his feet with more questions for DC Adams. Asks about Alex Hales - does DC Adams think he can be seen kicking a man in the head? Yes, says DC Adams. “Mr Stoke’s colleague has stamped down of Ryan Ali and kicked him.” Adams agrees

    What? Then why was he not charged as well? What on earth is going on here?
    I saw Alex Hales in a bar in an hotel where the England team were staying. Let's just say that his reported height of 6ft 5inches really doesn't do him justice. He is a giant of a man.
    This has also been puzzling me in the reports he tried to stop Stokes and got brushed off. Really? Someone of that size and physique?

    None of this is making sense at the moment. I'm wondering if the drunk was an officer on ASC.
    ASC? - altered state of consciousness?
  • Casino_RoyaleCasino_Royale Posts: 25,525
    Sean_F said:

    ydoethur said:

    surby said:
    It should be noted that they were Remainers:

    https://www.nfuonline.com/news/brexit-news/eu-referendum-news/nfu-council-agrees-resolution-on-the-eu-referendum/

    It should also be noted that their not terribly scientific polling indicated 52% remain, 26% leave and 22% uncertain in EUROPE membership in November 2015, and although that dipped by March most had gone to 'undecided.'

    https://www.nfuonline.com/news/brexit-news/eu-referendum-news/nfu-survey-of-members-on-eu-referendum/

    A lot of farmers have been kept solvent through EU environmental subsidies and tariff barriers to cheap food. The NFU will certainly want to keep us in the customs union if at all possible.
    I'd have thought a food shortage would be a licence to print money for farmers.


    If one reads the article in full, it’s actually a lobbying effort for precisely that.
  • AnorakAnorak Posts: 5,054
    Pulpstar said:

    Alex Hales behaviour seems odd here, why would he try and apparently stop Stokes then kick a man when he's down ?
    That's disturbing.

    Well a friend tries to stop you getting into trouble, but also backs you up when you do.
  • AnorakAnorak Posts: 5,054
    edited August 7
    Mr Meeks was right. All part of the plan... [@Tissue - don't you hate it when that happens :) ]
  • Tissue_PriceTissue_Price Posts: 7,846
    edited August 7
    Beaten to it...
  • Philip_ThompsonPhilip_Thompson Posts: 14,950

    FPT

    Anorak said:

    That's precisely what many in "the greatest generation" did. They sacrificed their lives to ensure we could be a free democracy.

    I'm not prepared to throw away their sacrifice on the altar of potentially avoiding a one off recession.

    So yes. Democracy and freedom are worth the loss of life. A recession is not.

    Mental and utterly unspoofable.
    So you are prepared to sacrifice democracy if it comes to it to avoid a small recession?

    Or you don't consider democracy worth the sacrifices our ancestors fought for?
    If you impose a recession against the will of the people at the time you're imposing it, in what sense are you doing it in the name of democracy?
    Recessions aren't imposed they're something that simply happens.

    That's like saying you're imposing bad weather.
    In the case of a disruptive Brexit it's a choice, not an act of God.
    We make choices all the time, that's democracy. The public were warned Brexit would cause a recession and voted for it anyway. If it happens that's still democracy and you get to say "I told you so"
  • AnazinaAnazina Posts: 2,240
    As I suggested earlier, some people are rather jumping the gun on the Ben Stokes case, as the defence has yet to make its case. Stokes will have a very good lawyer and the case is in any case very far from clear-cut. For instance, as far as I know, these two key witnesses have yet to be called to the stand...

    https://news.sky.com/story/ben-stokes-was-defending-us-from-homophobic-abuse-say-gay-men-11101889
  • rcs1000rcs1000 Posts: 23,400

    rcs1000 said:

    I'm involved in my first ever Twitter spat. I'm so proud. I'm currently fighting with some chap over the Priti Patel tweet re the Penny Morduant quote about the UK being the "oldest and most successful" country in Europe.

    Isn't Vatican City the oldest and most successful country in Europe?
    I would argue Switzerland is the most successful country in Europe, and France is probably the oldest.

    The Vatican only technically became a country in 1929.
  • tlg86tlg86 Posts: 9,237
    rcs1000 said:

    rcs1000 said:

    I'm involved in my first ever Twitter spat. I'm so proud. I'm currently fighting with some chap over the Priti Patel tweet re the Penny Morduant quote about the UK being the "oldest and most successful" country in Europe.

    Isn't Vatican City the oldest and most successful country in Europe?
    I would argue Switzerland is the most successful country in Europe, and France is probably the oldest.

    The Vatican only technically became a country in 1929.
    I thought the Portugal/Spain border was the oldest border.
  • rcs1000rcs1000 Posts: 23,400

    Sean_F said:

    surby said:
    It's certainly not the right time to be considering a ban on the consumption of dogs.
    That article is estimating when the UK could run out of food if we had to be wholly self sufficient in food, which no-one is suggesting.

    That would suggest the EU could impose an absolute economic blockade on the UK’s ability to trade with it and the rest of the world way more effective than the Kriegsmarine managed in WWII.
    Fact for the day: we import a smaller proportion of the calories we eat today than in 1900.
  • AnorakAnorak Posts: 5,054
    rcs1000 said:

    rcs1000 said:

    I'm involved in my first ever Twitter spat. I'm so proud. I'm currently fighting with some chap over the Priti Patel tweet re the Penny Morduant quote about the UK being the "oldest and most successful" country in Europe.

    Isn't Vatican City the oldest and most successful country in Europe?
    I would argue Switzerland is the most successful country in Europe, and France is probably the oldest.

    The Vatican only technically became a country in 1929.
    Wouldn't Greece be older? I wouldn't argue for it being the most successful country, mind.
  • oxfordsimonoxfordsimon Posts: 4,322
    rcs1000 said:

    rcs1000 said:

    I'm involved in my first ever Twitter spat. I'm so proud. I'm currently fighting with some chap over the Priti Patel tweet re the Penny Morduant quote about the UK being the "oldest and most successful" country in Europe.

    Isn't Vatican City the oldest and most successful country in Europe?
    I would argue Switzerland is the most successful country in Europe, and France is probably the oldest.

    The Vatican only technically became a country in 1929.
    France as we know it now is a relatively modern construct. Not as modern as Germany or Italy, but for centuries it really didn't have a consistent form. Gascony, Burgundy etc etc etc
  • rcs1000rcs1000 Posts: 23,400
    Anorak said:

    rcs1000 said:

    rcs1000 said:

    I'm involved in my first ever Twitter spat. I'm so proud. I'm currently fighting with some chap over the Priti Patel tweet re the Penny Morduant quote about the UK being the "oldest and most successful" country in Europe.

    Isn't Vatican City the oldest and most successful country in Europe?
    I would argue Switzerland is the most successful country in Europe, and France is probably the oldest.

    The Vatican only technically became a country in 1929.
    Wouldn't Greece be older? I wouldn't argue for it being the most successful country, mind.
    It only become independent from the Ottomans in 1821.
  • AlastairMeeksAlastairMeeks Posts: 21,328
    Anorak said:

    Mr Meeks was right. All part of the plan... [@Tissue - don't you hate it when that happens :) ]

    It's so bloody obvious what the game is. What's depressing is that it's being fallen for again.
  • AnorakAnorak Posts: 5,054
    rcs1000 said:

    Sean_F said:

    surby said:
    It's certainly not the right time to be considering a ban on the consumption of dogs.
    That article is estimating when the UK could run out of food if we had to be wholly self sufficient in food, which no-one is suggesting.

    That would suggest the EU could impose an absolute economic blockade on the UK’s ability to trade with it and the rest of the world way more effective than the Kriegsmarine managed in WWII.
    Fact for the day: we import a smaller proportion of the calories we eat today than in 1900.
    Really? Source or STFU, as the kidz say ;)

    [I'm actually quite interested]
  • Casino_RoyaleCasino_Royale Posts: 25,525
    rcs1000 said:

    rcs1000 said:

    I'm involved in my first ever Twitter spat. I'm so proud. I'm currently fighting with some chap over the Priti Patel tweet re the Penny Morduant quote about the UK being the "oldest and most successful" country in Europe.

    Isn't Vatican City the oldest and most successful country in Europe?
    I would argue Switzerland is the most successful country in Europe, and France is probably the oldest.

    The Vatican only technically became a country in 1929.
    We’d probably never be able to agree either the criteria or the top candidate.

    I think Switzerland is beautiful, but I also find Zurich boring, and you could kill yourself in Geneva on a Sunday, the food isn’t all that, and it’s rather too regulated for my liking.
This discussion has been closed.