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politicalbetting.com » Blog Archive » New Midterms survey finds the Democrats making progress in 69

SystemSystem Posts: 6,666
edited October 8 in General

imagepoliticalbetting.com » Blog Archive » New Midterms survey finds the Democrats making progress in 69 key marginals

In what we in the UK would describe as a poll of marginals the Washington Post is reporting a survey in 69 key Congressional districts which overall voted 56% Republican to 41% Democratic last time,

Read the full story here


«134

Comments

  • PClippPClipp Posts: 1,738
    First
  • TheuniondivvieTheuniondivvie Posts: 12,682
    Fpt

    The incels are taking Taylor Swift backing the Democrat in Tennessee well. Immediate removal from a host of wank banks is my guess.

  • QuincelQuincel Posts: 1,852
    Typo: "In UK terms that represents quite come swing." *quite some swing*, surely?
  • Sean_FSean_F Posts: 23,591

    That would imply a lead of about 17% for the Democrats in the House, overall, which conflicts with the rest of the polling.
  • AlastairMeeksAlastairMeeks Posts: 22,024
    As I have pointed out regularly, a remarkable number of Leavers are utterly reckless:

  • SlackbladderSlackbladder Posts: 6,619
    69 hur hur.....
  • TheWhiteRabbitTheWhiteRabbit Posts: 8,626

    As I have pointed out regularly, a remarkable number of Leavers are utterly reckless:

    Not this again, it's going to be one of those forced choice questions where the people polled don't accept the antecedent.

  • logical_songlogical_song Posts: 6,538
    Trump driving women away from the Republicans.
    "That means that when, say, 84 percent of Republican women say they approve of Trump and his actions, or 69 percent of Republican women say they support Kavanaugh, or 64 percent say they, like Trump, don’t find Ford very “credible,” those percentages represent a small and shrinking slice of American women."
    https://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2018/10/08/donald-trump-women-gop-221080
  • Beverley_CBeverley_C Posts: 5,483
    edited October 8
    FPT:

    matt said:


    Perhaps you should be asking yourself the question why you have a car at all. The entitlement culture is strong in the elderly.

    I have just seen your post. Are you real or do you live in London
    If you do not stop making controversial posts like this Mr G, the workhouse nurse might take your internet access away. The decrepit elderly are only supposed to read the church magazine whilst mashing their gums together in protest at the Vicar's mishandling of the tea fund.

    Ageism is the last bastion of prejudice. It is a very interesting one though, because it is one of the few "isms" that generally gets less intense as the prejudiced individual gets older
    On that basis, I wonder how society would turn out if humans were like Swordtail fish?
    It sounds a very interesting analogy? Could you explain please
    If all the males are removed from a tank of swordtails, the oldest females turn male. Other fish can do this too (Rock Bass, IIRC, has one male per school)

    What would the position of women in society be like if some of the older males (who usually run things in patriarchal societies) had formerly spent a large portion of their lives as female?

    Would women's position in society be less inferior? Would those who transformed grasp Male Privilege with both hands and, like Borgia, "... now that we have the Papacy we mean to enjoy it..."? What would happen in places like Rwanda where half the male population died and women now enjoy a more balanced public life whilst still struggling with the same old prejudicies in their personal and family life.

  • Beverley_CBeverley_C Posts: 5,483
    edited October 8
    FPT:

    Miss Cyclefree, honestly. Next you'll be opposing the proposed Logan's Run Act.

    Edited extra bit: also, good afternoon, everyone.

    For the avoidance of doubt Mr Dancer, we require you to declare that, as a historical anachronism, you do not possess a car and travel everywhere on a palanquin carried on the shoulders of six eunuchs.
  • AlastairMeeksAlastairMeeks Posts: 22,024

    FPT:

    matt said:


    Perhaps you should be asking yourself the question why you have a car at all. The entitlement culture is strong in the elderly.

    I have just seen your post. Are you real or do you live in London
    If you do not stop making controversial posts like this Mr G, the workhouse nurse might take your internet access away. The decrepit elderly are only supposed to read the church magazine whilst mashing their gums together in protest at the Vicar's mishandling of the tea fund.

    Ageism is the last bastion of prejudice. It is a very interesting one though, because it is one of the few "isms" that generally gets less intense as the prejudiced individual gets older
    On that basis, I wonder how society would turn out if humans were like Swordtail fish?
    It sounds a very interesting analogy? Could you explain please
    If all the males are removed from a tank of swordtails, the oldest females turn male. Other fish can do this too (Rock Bass, IIRC, has one male per school)

    What would the position of women in society be like if some of the older males (who usually run things in patriarchal societies) had formerly spent a large portion of their lives as female?

    Would women's position in society be less inferior? Would those who transformed grasp Male Privilege with both hands and, like Borgia, "... now that we have the Papacy we mean to enjoy it..."? What would happen in places like Rwanda where half the male population died and women now enjoy a more balanced public life whilst still struggling with the same old prejudicies in their personal and family life.

    There's a John Wyndham short story about a world in the near future where men have died out.

    Tiresias supposedly changed sex back and forth between man and woman because of Hera.
  • CyclefreeCyclefree Posts: 11,538

    FPT:

    Miss Cyclefree, honestly. Next you'll be opposing the proposed Logan's Run Act.

    Edited extra bit: also, good afternoon, everyone.

    For the avoidance of doubt Mr Dancer, we require you to declare that, as a historical anachronism, you do not possess a car and travel everywhere on a palanquin carried on the shoulders of six eunuchs.
    According to the map of electric charging points in the UK, the nearest one to us in Cumbria is 12 miles away, over some steep hills and fells. There are 2, both 12 miles away. Of these one has problems (as reported on the map today).

    So if people really want all petrol and diesel cars to stop being needed then a great deal more investment in electric charging points is going to be needed all over the country and not just in cities, together with cars with a better reliable range and an ability to charge quickly.

    The idea that the old should be confined to their homes and criticised for wanting a decent life is pretty repulsive. We should be making it easier for the older to continue contributing in lots of different ways for as long as possible not narrowing their horizons, physical or mental.
  • RobDRobD Posts: 34,621
    Pulpstar said:
    A purely hypothetical situation for most of them ;)
  • Beverley_CBeverley_C Posts: 5,483

    FPT:

    matt said:


    Perhaps you should be asking yourself the question why you have a car at all. The entitlement culture is strong in the elderly.

    I have just seen your post. Are you real or do you live in London
    If you do not stop making controversial posts like this Mr G, the workhouse nurse might take your internet access away. The decrepit elderly are only supposed to read the church magazine whilst mashing their gums together in protest at the Vicar's mishandling of the tea fund.

    Ageism is the last bastion of prejudice. It is a very interesting one though, because it is one of the few "isms" that generally gets less intense as the prejudiced individual gets older
    On that basis, I wonder how society would turn out if humans were like Swordtail fish?
    It sounds a very interesting analogy? Could you explain please
    If all the males are removed from a tank of swordtails, the oldest females turn male. Other fish can do this too (Rock Bass, IIRC, has one male per school)

    What would the position of women in society be like if some of the older males (who usually run things in patriarchal societies) had formerly spent a large portion of their lives as female?

    Would women's position in society be less inferior? Would those who transformed grasp Male Privilege with both hands and, like Borgia, "... now that we have the Papacy we mean to enjoy it..."? What would happen in places like Rwanda where half the male population died and women now enjoy a more balanced public life whilst still struggling with the same old prejudicies in their personal and family life.

    There's a John Wyndham short story about a world in the near future where men have died out.

    Tiresias supposedly changed sex back and forth between man and woman because of Hera.
    Thanks Mr Meeks - I was not aware of either of those :+1:
  • Beverley_CBeverley_C Posts: 5,483
    edited October 8
    Cyclefree said:

    FPT:

    Miss Cyclefree, honestly. Next you'll be opposing the proposed Logan's Run Act.

    Edited extra bit: also, good afternoon, everyone.

    For the avoidance of doubt Mr Dancer, we require you to declare that, as a historical anachronism, you do not possess a car and travel everywhere on a palanquin carried on the shoulders of six eunuchs.
    According to the map of electric charging points in the UK, the nearest one to us in Cumbria is 12 miles away, over some steep hills and fells. There are 2, both 12 miles away. Of these one has problems (as reported on the map today).

    So if people really want all petrol and diesel cars to stop being needed then a great deal more investment in electric charging points is going to be needed all over the country and not just in cities, together with cars with a better reliable range and an ability to charge quickly.

    The idea that the old should be confined to their homes and criticised for wanting a decent life is pretty repulsive. We should be making it easier for the older to continue contributing in lots of different ways for as long as possible not narrowing their horizons, physical or mental.
    Should I have flagged the Irony Indicator?
  • CyclefreeCyclefree Posts: 11,538

    FPT:

    matt said:


    Perhaps you should be asking yourself the question why you have a car at all. The entitlement culture is strong in the elderly.

    I have just seen your post. Are you real or do you live in London
    If you do not stop making controversial posts like this Mr G, the workhouse nurse might take your internet access away. The decrepit elderly are only supposed to read the church magazine whilst mashing their gums together in protest at the Vicar's mishandling of the tea fund.

    Ageism is the last bastion of prejudice. It is a very interesting one though, because it is one of the few "isms" that generally gets less intense as the prejudiced individual gets older
    On that basis, I wonder how society would turn out if humans were like Swordtail fish?
    It sounds a very interesting analogy? Could you explain please
    If all the males are removed from a tank of swordtails, the oldest females turn male. Other fish can do this too (Rock Bass, IIRC, has one male per school)

    What would the position of women in society be like if some of the older males (who usually run things in patriarchal societies) had formerly spent a large portion of their lives as female?

    Would women's position in society be less inferior? Would those who transformed grasp Male Privilege with both hands and, like Borgia, "... now that we have the Papacy we mean to enjoy it..."? What would happen in places like Rwanda where half the male population died and women now enjoy a more balanced public life whilst still struggling with the same old prejudicies in their personal and family life.

    There's a John Wyndham short story about a world in the near future where men have died out.

    Tiresias supposedly changed sex back and forth between man and woman because of Hera.
    In my Irish family all the men (including my father) died young and all the women lived on for a further 30 years on average having a high old time. And not just in my parents' generation but for several generations before then.

    And even in my mother's family, the women seemed to run everything, even when there were men still around. As a child they always seemed to me to be appendages rather than at the centre of things.

    I am rather hoping, as the daughter of the eldest son, that I have inherited my Irish grandmother's constitution rather than my father's.
  • AlastairMeeksAlastairMeeks Posts: 22,024
    On topic, it would be helpful to know how in practice the USA has swung in the past. You would have thought that UNS would work well in what is essentially a binary contest.
  • TheWhiteRabbitTheWhiteRabbit Posts: 8,626
    Pulpstar said:
    I may be tightfisted but I suggest at least SOME money should be spent on the Welsh...
  • CyclefreeCyclefree Posts: 11,538

    Cyclefree said:

    FPT:

    Miss Cyclefree, honestly. Next you'll be opposing the proposed Logan's Run Act.

    Edited extra bit: also, good afternoon, everyone.

    For the avoidance of doubt Mr Dancer, we require you to declare that, as a historical anachronism, you do not possess a car and travel everywhere on a palanquin carried on the shoulders of six eunuchs.
    According to the map of electric charging points in the UK, the nearest one to us in Cumbria is 12 miles away, over some steep hills and fells. There are 2, both 12 miles away. Of these one has problems (as reported on the map today).

    So if people really want all petrol and diesel cars to stop being needed then a great deal more investment in electric charging points is going to be needed all over the country and not just in cities, together with cars with a better reliable range and an ability to charge quickly.

    The idea that the old should be confined to their homes and criticised for wanting a decent life is pretty repulsive. We should be making it easier for the older to continue contributing in lots of different ways for as long as possible not narrowing their horizons, physical or mental.
    Should I have flagged the Irony Indicator?
    No, I got it. I rather had @matt's odd comment on the previous thread in mind.
  • Pro_RataPro_Rata Posts: 991
    edited October 8
    Interesting nugget on the local news: a Windrush support body in Huddersfield estimating that 500 people in the town have suffered citizenship issues from the Windrush era. Black and Black British population of the town from census is a little above 6,500.

    Scaling up to the UK as a whole, and making a little allowance for the fact that a campaign group estimate may be at the high end, that translates to somewhere around 50k people nationally, 5% or so of those who identify as Black, who might need cases looking at. Whatever, it seems that the several dozen or so wrongful deportations are very much the thin end of the wedge.
  • AlastairMeeksAlastairMeeks Posts: 22,024

    FPT:

    matt said:


    Perhaps you should be asking yourself the question why you have a car at all. The entitlement culture is strong in the elderly.

    I have just seen your post. Are you real or do you live in London
    If you do not stop making controversial posts like this Mr G, the workhouse nurse might take your internet access away. The decrepit elderly are only supposed to read the church magazine whilst mashing their gums together in protest at the Vicar's mishandling of the tea fund.

    Ageism is the last bastion of prejudice. It is a very interesting one though, because it is one of the few "isms" that generally gets less intense as the prejudiced individual gets older
    On that basis, I wonder how society would turn out if humans were like Swordtail fish?
    It sounds a very interesting analogy? Could you explain please
    If all the males are removed from a tank of swordtails, the oldest females turn male. Other fish can do this too (Rock Bass, IIRC, has one male per school)

    What would the position of women in society be like if some of the older males (who usually run things in patriarchal societies) had formerly spent a large portion of their lives as female?

    Would women's position in society be less inferior? Would those who transformed grasp Male Privilege with both hands and, like Borgia, "... now that we have the Papacy we mean to enjoy it..."? What would happen in places like Rwanda where half the male population died and women now enjoy a more balanced public life whilst still struggling with the same old prejudicies in their personal and family life.

    There's a John Wyndham short story about a world in the near future where men have died out.

    Tiresias supposedly changed sex back and forth between man and woman because of Hera.
    Thanks Mr Meeks - I was not aware of either of those :+1:
    The John Wyndham story is called Consider Her Ways.

    As a Norfolk boy, I have to stop myself from typing Wymondham.
  • Morris_DancerMorris_Dancer Posts: 46,447
    FPT: Mrs C, I am not a historical anachronism! I'm the epitome of modernity. Why, this very year I acquired a mechanical calculator of cutting edge design (manufactured in 1948, designed in 1938).

    And I do not possess a car. I travel in a chariot drawn by six enormo-haddock.
  • PulpstarPulpstar Posts: 48,285

    On topic, it would be helpful to know how in practice the USA has swung in the past. You would have thought that UNS would work well in what is essentially a binary contest.

    This might not have been your question, but both the house and the senate almost always swing against the incumbent presidency.

    https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/how-crazy-is-it-that-the-senate-and-house-might-move-in-opposite-directions-this-year/
  • Beverley_CBeverley_C Posts: 5,483
    Cyclefree said:

    In my Irish family all the men (including my father) died young and all the women lived on for a further 30 years on average having a high old time. And not just in my parents' generation but for several generations before then.

    And even in my mother's family, the women seemed to run everything, even when there were men still around. As a child they always seemed to me to be appendages rather than at the centre of things.

    I am rather hoping, as the daughter of the eldest son, that I have inherited my Irish grandmother's constitution rather than my father's.

    A lot of my friends are divorced women - I must be that sort of age ....

    Men are those strange creatures on the periphery of our social circle, but they are very useful for lifting things or tinkering with oily stuff and spanners.

    I wonder what they are really for? :D :D :D
  • TheWhiteRabbitTheWhiteRabbit Posts: 8,626
    Pro_Rata said:

    Interesting nugget on the local news: a Windrush support body in Huddersfield estimating that 500 people in the town have suffered citizenship issues from the Windrush era. Black and Black British population of the town from census is a little above 6,500.

    Scaling up to the UK as a whole, and making a little allowance for the fact that a campaign group estimate may be at the high end, that translates to somewhere around 50k people nationally, 5% or so of those who identify as Black, who might need cases looking at. Whatever, it seems that the several dozen or so wrongful deportations are very much the thin end of the wedge.

    I suspect having given the Home Office a dozen attempts to get it right, they managed to get their "citizenship issues" sorted. not to say that didn't create a lot of worry, time, and cost, of course.
  • JosiasJessopJosiasJessop Posts: 22,187

    FPT:

    If all the males are removed from a tank of swordtails, the oldest females turn male. Other fish can do this too (Rock Bass, IIRC, has one male per school)

    What would the position of women in society be like if some of the older males (who usually run things in patriarchal societies) had formerly spent a large portion of their lives as female?

    Would women's position in society be less inferior? Would those who transformed grasp Male Privilege with both hands and, like Borgia, "... now that we have the Papacy we mean to enjoy it..."? What would happen in places like Rwanda where half the male population died and women now enjoy a more balanced public life whilst still struggling with the same old prejudicies in their personal and family life.

    That is a very interesting question, and IMV the chances are that it is such a fundamental change to the way things are that society would have developed, and be organised, in such a different manner as to be unrecognisable.

    The chances are that gender prejudices would still exist in such a world, albeit in other forms.

    Which poses another question: are prejudices in-built, or even necessary in basic human society? And if so, is it not important that a person has prejudices, but how they act in response to them?
  • CyclefreeCyclefree Posts: 11,538

    Cyclefree said:

    In my Irish family all the men (including my father) died young and all the women lived on for a further 30 years on average having a high old time. And not just in my parents' generation but for several generations before then.

    And even in my mother's family, the women seemed to run everything, even when there were men still around. As a child they always seemed to me to be appendages rather than at the centre of things.

    I am rather hoping, as the daughter of the eldest son, that I have inherited my Irish grandmother's constitution rather than my father's.

    A lot of my friends are divorced women - I must be that sort of age ....

    Men are those strange creatures on the periphery of our social circle, but they are very useful for lifting things or tinkering with oily stuff and spanners.

    I wonder what they are really for? :D :D :D
    If you ever find out, do tell.......

    Mine is mostly useful for collecting junk and gadgets (filed under "Things Which Will Come in Useful One Day" but never do) which I then have to take to the recycling. I should have been warned when, during our courtship, on holiday in Ireland, he produced a gadget which, if plugged into the car would boil water so we could make some coffee. Given the time it took (not to mention the risk of pouring hot water over our feet while driving) it was undoubtedly quicker to drive anywhere on the island to buy a coffee.

    But, despite that, reader, I still married him...... :)
  • CyclefreeCyclefree Posts: 11,538
    geoffw said:
    Depends on whether it comes with a four-day-working week salary or a five-day one and, if the latter, how that gets paid for.
  • BromptonautBromptonaut Posts: 1,091
    Cyclefree said:

    FPT:

    Miss Cyclefree, honestly. Next you'll be opposing the proposed Logan's Run Act.

    Edited extra bit: also, good afternoon, everyone.

    For the avoidance of doubt Mr Dancer, we require you to declare that, as a historical anachronism, you do not possess a car and travel everywhere on a palanquin carried on the shoulders of six eunuchs.
    According to the map of electric charging points in the UK, the nearest one to us in Cumbria is 12 miles away, over some steep hills and fells. There are 2, both 12 miles away. Of these one has problems (as reported on the map today).

    So if people really want all petrol and diesel cars to stop being needed then a great deal more investment in electric charging points is going to be needed all over the country and not just in cities, together with cars with a better reliable range and an ability to charge quickly.

    The idea that the old should be confined to their homes and criticised for wanting a decent life is pretty repulsive. We should be making it easier for the older to continue contributing in lots of different ways for as long as possible not narrowing their horizons, physical or mental.
    Most EV charging takes place at home. Don’t you have electricity then?
  • Sean_FSean_F Posts: 23,591

    FPT:

    matt said:


    Perhaps you should be asking yourself the question why you have a car at all. The entitlement culture is strong in the elderly.

    I have just seen your post. Are you real or do you live in London
    If you do not stop making controversial posts like this Mr G, the workhouse nurse might take your internet access away. The decrepit elderly are only supposed to read the church magazine whilst mashing their gums together in protest at the Vicar's mishandling of the tea fund.

    Ageism is the last bastion of prejudice. It is a very interesting one though, because it is one of the few "isms" that generally gets less intense as the prejudiced individual gets older
    On that basis, I wonder how society would turn out if humans were like Swordtail fish?
    It sounds a very interesting analogy? Could you explain please
    If all the males are removed from a tank of swordtails, the oldest females turn male. Other fish can do this too (Rock Bass, IIRC, has one male per school)

    What would the position of women in society be like if some of the older males (who usually run things in patriarchal societies) had formerly spent a large portion of their lives as female?

    Would women's position in society be less inferior? Would those who transformed grasp Male Privilege with both hands and, like Borgia, "... now that we have the Papacy we mean to enjoy it..."? What would happen in places like Rwanda where half the male population died and women now enjoy a more balanced public life whilst still struggling with the same old prejudicies in their personal and family life.

    There are some examples. In Southern Italy, the Italian government carried out a major crackdown on the Camorra and N'dragheta after 2000, rounding up thousands of mobsters.. So, the mobsters' female relatives took up the killing, drug-trafficking, and extortion which their imprisoned male relatives could no longer carry out.

    Some Polynesian societies were matriarchies, where lands and titles descended through the female line, because most males died violently at an early age.

    In the absence of men, women will occupy positions that have previously been occupied by men, and act in the ways that men act.
  • CarlottaVanceCarlottaVance Posts: 31,779
    As Mr Meeks posted on the previous thread....



    Perhaps Mrs May should stagger into the next Brussels meeting as a result of being drunk sciatica.....
  • JonathanJonathan Posts: 9,828

    Cyclefree said:

    FPT:

    Miss Cyclefree, honestly. Next you'll be opposing the proposed Logan's Run Act.

    Edited extra bit: also, good afternoon, everyone.

    For the avoidance of doubt Mr Dancer, we require you to declare that, as a historical anachronism, you do not possess a car and travel everywhere on a palanquin carried on the shoulders of six eunuchs.
    According to the map of electric charging points in the UK, the nearest one to us in Cumbria is 12 miles away, over some steep hills and fells. There are 2, both 12 miles away. Of these one has problems (as reported on the map today).

    So if people really want all petrol and diesel cars to stop being needed then a great deal more investment in electric charging points is going to be needed all over the country and not just in cities, together with cars with a better reliable range and an ability to charge quickly.

    The idea that the old should be confined to their homes and criticised for wanting a decent life is pretty repulsive. We should be making it easier for the older to continue contributing in lots of different ways for as long as possible not narrowing their horizons, physical or mental.
    Most EV charging takes place at home. Don’t you have electricity then?
    Plug it into Selafield. Actually, that close you may not need to plug it in at all.
  • Beverley_CBeverley_C Posts: 5,483
    Sean_F said:

    FPT:

    matt said:


    Perhaps you should be asking yourself the question why you have a car at all. The entitlement culture is strong in the elderly.

    I have just seen your post. Are you real or do you live in London
    If you do not stop making controversial posts like this Mr G, the workhouse nurse might take your internet access away. The decrepit elderly are only supposed to read the church magazine whilst mashing their gums together in protest at the Vicar's mishandling of the tea fund.

    Ageism is the last bastion of prejudice. It is a very interesting one though, because it is one of the few "isms" that generally gets less intense as the prejudiced individual gets older
    On that basis, I wonder how society would turn out if humans were like Swordtail fish?
    It sounds a very interesting analogy? Could you explain please
    If all the males are removed from a tank of swordtails, the oldest females turn male. Other fish can do this too (Rock Bass, IIRC, has one male per school)

    What would the position of women in society be like if some of the older males (who usually run things in patriarchal societies) had formerly spent a large portion of their lives as female?

    Would women's position in society be less inferior? Would those who transformed grasp Male Privilege with both hands and, like Borgia, "... now that we have the Papacy we mean to enjoy it..."? What would happen in places like Rwanda where half the male population died and women now enjoy a more balanced public life whilst still struggling with the same old prejudicies in their personal and family life.

    There are some examples. In Southern Italy, the Italian government carried out a major crackdown on the Camorra and N'dragheta after 2000, rounding up thousands of mobsters.. So, the mobsters' female relatives took up the killing, drug-trafficking, and extortion which their imprisoned male relatives could no longer carry out.

    Some Polynesian societies were matriarchies, where lands and titles descended through the female line, because most males died violently at an early age.

    In the absence of men, women will occupy positions that have previously been occupied by men, and act in the ways that men act.
    Interesting! Thank you :+1:
  • Morris_DancerMorris_Dancer Posts: 46,447
    edited October 8
    Women, nicer as leaders than men?

    A questionable assumption. Consider the most famous British leaders: Boudicca, Elizabeth I, and Thatcher. Or the women at the time of the Diadochi era. Roxanne had her rival wives assassinated just in case they were pregnant (she was, and they were higher status). Olympias forced Adea to commit suicide, after the pair of them perhaps became the first to lead opposing armies (as women), although sentimentality (from the male soldiers) meant battle did not commence. Cratesipolis commanded armies in Greece.

    Edited extra bit: as an aside, we don't actually know Cratesipolis' name. The word I used is her nickname (many were given at this time) which means something along the lines of 'sacker of cities'.

    Edited extra bit 2: should've said 'widows' rather than 'wives'. Alexander's death kicked off the Diadochi era, and quite a lot of war.
  • rkrkrkrkrkrk Posts: 4,804
    Sean_F said:


    That would imply a lead of about 17% for the Democrats in the House, overall, which conflicts with the rest of the polling.

    It is plausible that the biggest swings are among moderates/moderate areas. Partisans are entrenched by Trump.
  • Ishmael_ZIshmael_Z Posts: 5,931

    Women, nicer as leaders than men?

    A questionable assumption. Consider the most famous British leaders: Boudicca, Elizabeth I, and Thatcher. Or the women at the time of the Diadochi era. Roxanne had her rival wives assassinated just in case they were pregnant (she was, and they were higher status). Olympias forced Adea to commit suicide, after the pair of them perhaps became the first to lead opposing armies (as women), although sentimentality (from the male soldiers) meant battle did not commence. Cratesipolis commanded armies in Greece.

    Edited extra bit: as an aside, we don't actually know Cratesipolis' name. The word I used is her nickname (many were given at this time) which means something along the lines of 'sacker of cities'.

    Edited extra bit 2: should've said 'widows' rather than 'wives'. Alexander's death kicked off the Diadochi era, and quite a lot of war.

    The two greatest counterfactuals in history: what if Alexander had gone West instead of East, and what if he had left a proper heir?
  • CyclefreeCyclefree Posts: 11,538

    Cyclefree said:

    FPT:

    Miss Cyclefree, honestly. Next you'll be opposing the proposed Logan's Run Act.

    Edited extra bit: also, good afternoon, everyone.

    For the avoidance of doubt Mr Dancer, we require you to declare that, as a historical anachronism, you do not possess a car and travel everywhere on a palanquin carried on the shoulders of six eunuchs.
    According to the map of electric charging points in the UK, the nearest one to us in Cumbria is 12 miles away, over some steep hills and fells. There are 2, both 12 miles away. Of these one has problems (as reported on the map today).

    So if people really want all petrol and diesel cars to stop being needed then a great deal more investment in electric charging points is going to be needed all over the country and not just in cities, together with cars with a better reliable range and an ability to charge quickly.

    The idea that the old should be confined to their homes and criticised for wanting a decent life is pretty repulsive. We should be making it easier for the older to continue contributing in lots of different ways for as long as possible not narrowing their horizons, physical or mental.
    Most EV charging takes place at home. Don’t you have electricity then?
    Does it? How does that work in cities then when you cannot guarantee getting a parking place outside your home? The only electric cars I've seen charging in London have been at those charge points not from homes. Do people have long cables snaking out of their homes to the car?
  • Beverley_CBeverley_C Posts: 5,483
    Cyclefree said:

    Cyclefree said:

    In my Irish family all the men (including my father) died young and all the women lived on for a further 30 years on average having a high old time. And not just in my parents' generation but for several generations before then.

    And even in my mother's family, the women seemed to run everything, even when there were men still around. As a child they always seemed to me to be appendages rather than at the centre of things.

    I am rather hoping, as the daughter of the eldest son, that I have inherited my Irish grandmother's constitution rather than my father's.

    A lot of my friends are divorced women - I must be that sort of age ....

    Men are those strange creatures on the periphery of our social circle, but they are very useful for lifting things or tinkering with oily stuff and spanners.

    I wonder what they are really for? :D :D :D
    If you ever find out, do tell.......

    Mine is mostly useful for collecting junk and gadgets (filed under "Things Which Will Come in Useful One Day" but never do) which I then have to take to the recycling. I should have been warned when, during our courtship, on holiday in Ireland, he produced a gadget which, if plugged into the car would boil water so we could make some coffee. Given the time it took (not to mention the risk of pouring hot water over our feet while driving) it was undoubtedly quicker to drive anywhere on the island to buy a coffee.

    But, despite that, reader, I still married him...... :)
    :D
  • Morris_DancerMorris_Dancer Posts: 46,447
    Mr. Z, going west straight from the Balkans? Very unlikely given the history (not least Xenophon's handy guidebook-in-reverse). I suspect he would've beaten the Romans. At the stage they hadn't defeated the Tarentines and perhaps not the Samnites either.

    A proper heir would've been interesting. The empire stretched, on modern boundaries, from Albania to the eastern border of Pakistan. Maintaining it would've been a challenge (although the Persians, with almost as much territory, had it for a few centuries).
  • Beverley_CBeverley_C Posts: 5,483

    Women, nicer as leaders than men?

    I never said "nicer" Mr Dancer. I am not that foolish...
  • Sean_FSean_F Posts: 23,591
    rkrkrk said:

    Sean_F said:


    That would imply a lead of about 17% for the Democrats in the House, overall, which conflicts with the rest of the polling.

    It is plausible that the biggest swings are among moderates/moderate areas. Partisans are entrenched by Trump.
    But, not to such an extent, in my view. A wing of 9% to the Democrats (which this poll implies) would give them a majority of 100+ in the House.
  • TheWhiteRabbitTheWhiteRabbit Posts: 8,626

    As Mr Meeks posted on the previous thread....



    Perhaps Mrs May should stagger into the next Brussels meeting as a result of being drunk sciatica.....

    Does Juncker try to work out the only thing that could make him less popular here?
  • rcs1000rcs1000 Posts: 23,964
    Cyclefree said:

    FPT:

    Miss Cyclefree, honestly. Next you'll be opposing the proposed Logan's Run Act.

    Edited extra bit: also, good afternoon, everyone.

    For the avoidance of doubt Mr Dancer, we require you to declare that, as a historical anachronism, you do not possess a car and travel everywhere on a palanquin carried on the shoulders of six eunuchs.
    According to the map of electric charging points in the UK, the nearest one to us in Cumbria is 12 miles away, over some steep hills and fells. There are 2, both 12 miles away. Of these one has problems (as reported on the map today).

    So if people really want all petrol and diesel cars to stop being needed then a great deal more investment in electric charging points is going to be needed all over the country and not just in cities, together with cars with a better reliable range and an ability to charge quickly.

    The idea that the old should be confined to their homes and criticised for wanting a decent life is pretty repulsive. We should be making it easier for the older to continue contributing in lots of different ways for as long as possible not narrowing their horizons, physical or mental.
    Ummm... What's wrong with charging your car at home?
  • Sean_FSean_F Posts: 23,591

    Mr. Z, going west straight from the Balkans? Very unlikely given the history (not least Xenophon's handy guidebook-in-reverse). I suspect he would've beaten the Romans. At the stage they hadn't defeated the Tarentines and perhaps not the Samnites either.

    A proper heir would've been interesting. The empire stretched, on modern boundaries, from Albania to the eastern border of Pakistan. Maintaining it would've been a challenge (although the Persians, with almost as much territory, had it for a few centuries).

    I doubt if he'd have been interested in Italy, other than the Greek cities in the South. He'd probably have aimed to conquer Sicily and Carthage.
  • Beverley_CBeverley_C Posts: 5,483
    rcs1000 said:

    Cyclefree said:

    FPT:

    Miss Cyclefree, honestly. Next you'll be opposing the proposed Logan's Run Act.

    Edited extra bit: also, good afternoon, everyone.

    For the avoidance of doubt Mr Dancer, we require you to declare that, as a historical anachronism, you do not possess a car and travel everywhere on a palanquin carried on the shoulders of six eunuchs.
    According to the map of electric charging points in the UK, the nearest one to us in Cumbria is 12 miles away, over some steep hills and fells. There are 2, both 12 miles away. Of these one has problems (as reported on the map today).

    So if people really want all petrol and diesel cars to stop being needed then a great deal more investment in electric charging points is going to be needed all over the country and not just in cities, together with cars with a better reliable range and an ability to charge quickly.

    The idea that the old should be confined to their homes and criticised for wanting a decent life is pretty repulsive. We should be making it easier for the older to continue contributing in lots of different ways for as long as possible not narrowing their horizons, physical or mental.
    Ummm... What's wrong with charging your car at home?
    Nothing wrong at all, unless you have a 30 mile range and a 60 mile journey sort of thing ...
  • PulpstarPulpstar Posts: 48,285
    rcs1000 said:

    Cyclefree said:

    FPT:

    Miss Cyclefree, honestly. Next you'll be opposing the proposed Logan's Run Act.

    Edited extra bit: also, good afternoon, everyone.

    For the avoidance of doubt Mr Dancer, we require you to declare that, as a historical anachronism, you do not possess a car and travel everywhere on a palanquin carried on the shoulders of six eunuchs.
    According to the map of electric charging points in the UK, the nearest one to us in Cumbria is 12 miles away, over some steep hills and fells. There are 2, both 12 miles away. Of these one has problems (as reported on the map today).

    So if people really want all petrol and diesel cars to stop being needed then a great deal more investment in electric charging points is going to be needed all over the country and not just in cities, together with cars with a better reliable range and an ability to charge quickly.

    The idea that the old should be confined to their homes and criticised for wanting a decent life is pretty repulsive. We should be making it easier for the older to continue contributing in lots of different ways for as long as possible not narrowing their horizons, physical or mental.
    Ummm... What's wrong with charging your car at home?
    What happens if you don't have a drive :D ?
  • Morris_DancerMorris_Dancer Posts: 46,447
    Mr. F, Tarentum and Syracuse would've put him very close to Roman interests (the latter also close to Carthage), and Massilia would've placed him between the Gauls and Romans.
  • CyclefreeCyclefree Posts: 11,538
    rcs1000 said:

    Cyclefree said:

    FPT:

    Miss Cyclefree, honestly. Next you'll be opposing the proposed Logan's Run Act.

    Edited extra bit: also, good afternoon, everyone.

    For the avoidance of doubt Mr Dancer, we require you to declare that, as a historical anachronism, you do not possess a car and travel everywhere on a palanquin carried on the shoulders of six eunuchs.
    According to the map of electric charging points in the UK, the nearest one to us in Cumbria is 12 miles away, over some steep hills and fells. There are 2, both 12 miles away. Of these one has problems (as reported on the map today).

    So if people really want all petrol and diesel cars to stop being needed then a great deal more investment in electric charging points is going to be needed all over the country and not just in cities, together with cars with a better reliable range and an ability to charge quickly.

    The idea that the old should be confined to their homes and criticised for wanting a decent life is pretty repulsive. We should be making it easier for the older to continue contributing in lots of different ways for as long as possible not narrowing their horizons, physical or mental.
    Ummm... What's wrong with charging your car at home?
    I've never seen this done, not in London anyway. Unless you have a drive or off-street parking home charging is not feasible, is it?

    Unless I'm missing something.....
  • Sean_FSean_F Posts: 23,591

    Sean_F said:

    FPT:

    matt said:


    Perhaps you should be asking yourself the question why you have a car at all. The entitlement culture is strong in the elderly.

    I have just seen your post. Are you real or do you live in London
    I

    Ageism is the last bastion of prejudice. It is a very interesting one though, because it is one of the few "isms" that generally gets less intense as the prejudiced individual gets older
    On that basis, I wonder how society would turn out if humans were like Swordtail fish?
    It sounds a very interesting analogy? Could you explain please
    If all the males are removed from a tank of swordtails, the oldest females turn male. Other fish can do this too (Rock Bass, IIRC, has one male per school)

    What would the position of women in society be like if some of the older males (who usually run things in patriarchal societies) had formerly spent a large portion of their lives as female?

    Would women's position in society be less inferior? Would those who transformed grasp Male Privilege with both hands and, like Borgia, "... now that we have the Papacy we mean to enjoy it..."? What would happen in places like Rwanda where half the male population died and women now enjoy a more balanced public life whilst still struggling with the same old prejudicies in their personal and family life.

    There are some examples. In Southern Italy, the Italian government carried out a major crackdown on the Camorra and N'dragheta after 2000, rounding up thousands of mobsters.. So, the mobsters' female relatives took up the killing, drug-trafficking, and extortion which their imprisoned male relatives could no longer carry out.

    Some Polynesian societies were matriarchies, where lands and titles descended through the female line, because most males died violently at an early age.

    In the absence of men, women will occupy positions that have previously been occupied by men, and act in the ways that men act.
    Interesting! Thank you :+1:
    I read one article recently, that Italian police estimate there are about 150 women in positions of leadership in organised crime, in Southern Italy. I think it's interesting that in such a traditionalist society, protecting the interests of the "family" matter far more than maintaining traditional gender roles.
  • rkrkrkrkrkrk Posts: 4,804
    Sean_F said:

    rkrkrk said:

    Sean_F said:


    That would imply a lead of about 17% for the Democrats in the House, overall, which conflicts with the rest of the polling.

    It is plausible that the biggest swings are among moderates/moderate areas. Partisans are entrenched by Trump.
    But, not to such an extent, in my view. A wing of 9% to the Democrats (which this poll implies) would give them a majority of 100+ in the House.
    It only implies that if you think these places are representative and they were chosen not to be.
    Trump crushed Clinton with independents in 2016 in key states like Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin. We see from the polling his numbers are good with his party, so logically he is losing support among those independents...

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/snaf.ivn.us/amp/news_articles/66b40975-c9b8-4fe5-9957-64ec5a587e92
  • logical_songlogical_song Posts: 6,538
    Cyclefree said:

    rcs1000 said:

    Cyclefree said:

    FPT:

    Miss Cyclefree, honestly. Next you'll be opposing the proposed Logan's Run Act.

    Edited extra bit: also, good afternoon, everyone.

    For the avoidance of doubt Mr Dancer, we require you to declare that, as a historical anachronism, you do not possess a car and travel everywhere on a palanquin carried on the shoulders of six eunuchs.
    According to the map of electric charging points in the UK, the nearest one to us in Cumbria is 12 miles away, over some steep hills and fells. There are 2, both 12 miles away. Of these one has problems (as reported on the map today).

    So if people really want all petrol and diesel cars to stop being needed then a great deal more investment in electric charging points is going to be needed all over the country and not just in cities, together with cars with a better reliable range and an ability to charge quickly.

    The idea that the old should be confined to their homes and criticised for wanting a decent life is pretty repulsive. We should be making it easier for the older to continue contributing in lots of different ways for as long as possible not narrowing their horizons, physical or mental.
    Ummm... What's wrong with charging your car at home?
    I've never seen this done, not in London anyway. Unless you have a drive or off-street parking home charging is not feasible, is it?

    Unless I'm missing something.....
    Not many yet, but ....
    https://www.zap-map.com/london-borough-switches-on-lamp-post-chargers/
  • AndyJSAndyJS Posts: 23,788
    "Europe Elects
    @EuropeElects
    3h3 hours ago

    Italy, Demopolis poll:

    LEGA-ENF: 33% (+1)
    M5S-EFDD: 31% (+1)
    PD-S&D: 17%
    FI-EPP: 9%
    FdI-*: 3%
    LeU-S&D: 2%

    Sample size: 1,500"
  • AndyJSAndyJS Posts: 23,788
    Cyclefree said:

    rcs1000 said:

    Cyclefree said:

    FPT:

    Miss Cyclefree, honestly. Next you'll be opposing the proposed Logan's Run Act.

    Edited extra bit: also, good afternoon, everyone.

    For the avoidance of doubt Mr Dancer, we require you to declare that, as a historical anachronism, you do not possess a car and travel everywhere on a palanquin carried on the shoulders of six eunuchs.
    According to the map of electric charging points in the UK, the nearest one to us in Cumbria is 12 miles away, over some steep hills and fells. There are 2, both 12 miles away. Of these one has problems (as reported on the map today).

    So if people really want all petrol and diesel cars to stop being needed then a great deal more investment in electric charging points is going to be needed all over the country and not just in cities, together with cars with a better reliable range and an ability to charge quickly.

    The idea that the old should be confined to their homes and criticised for wanting a decent life is pretty repulsive. We should be making it easier for the older to continue contributing in lots of different ways for as long as possible not narrowing their horizons, physical or mental.
    Ummm... What's wrong with charging your car at home?
    I've never seen this done, not in London anyway. Unless you have a drive or off-street parking home charging is not feasible, is it?

    Unless I'm missing something.....
    A significant percentage of houses in Outer London have garages where a charge point could be installed. But you're right about inner London. Most people wouldn't be able to charge where they park unless they find a communal charge point.
  • NigelbNigelb Posts: 8,666

    FPT: Mrs C, I am not a historical anachronism! I'm the epitome of modernity. Why, this very year I acquired a mechanical calculator of cutting edge design (manufactured in 1948, designed in 1938).

    The Curta ?
    Popular with rally navigators in the '50s and '60s.

    The inventor perfected his original design while interned in Buchenwald, which perhaps saved his life.
  • Pro_RataPro_Rata Posts: 991
    edited October 8
    rkrkrk said:

    Sean_F said:

    rkrkrk said:

    Sean_F said:


    That would imply a lead of about 17% for the Democrats in the House, overall, which conflicts with the rest of the polling.

    It is plausible that the biggest swings are among moderates/moderate areas. Partisans are entrenched by Trump.
    But, not to such an extent, in my view. A wing of 9% to the Democrats (which this poll implies) would give them a majority of 100+ in the House.
    It only implies that if you think these places are representative and they were chosen not to be.
    Trump crushed Clinton with independents in 2016 in key states like Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin. We see from the polling his numbers are good with his party, so logically he is losing support among those independents...

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/snaf.ivn.us/amp/news_articles/66b40975-c9b8-4fe5-9957-64ec5a587e92
    The implication must be that the states up for Senate election are unrepresentative, IN TERMS OF SWING, I guess in an estimation that at least some of Trump's rust belt strength will endure from 2016.

    Senate swing has a base point reference to 2012 whilst House has a base point reference of 2016. However, combined House swing between 2012 -> 2016 is a mere 1.15% to the Republicans between the two dates, so the base point references aren't hugely different. (For comparison, the other prominent 2012 -> 2016 swing, that of the Presidential election, was just 0.9% to Republican).
  • TOPPINGTOPPING Posts: 15,583
    Cyclefree said:

    rcs1000 said:

    Cyclefree said:

    FPT:

    Miss Cyclefree, honestly. Next you'll be opposing the proposed Logan's Run Act.

    Edited extra bit: also, good afternoon, everyone.

    For the avoidance of doubt Mr Dancer, we require you to declare that, as a historical anachronism, you do not possess a car and travel everywhere on a palanquin carried on the shoulders of six eunuchs.
    According to the map of electric charging points in the UK, the nearest one to us in Cumbria is 12 miles away, over some steep hills and fells. There are 2, both 12 miles away. Of these one has problems (as reported on the map today).

    So if people really want all petrol and diesel cars to stop being needed then a great deal more investment in electric charging points is going to be needed all over the country and not just in cities, together with cars with a better reliable range and an ability to charge quickly.

    The idea that the old should be confined to their homes and criticised for wanting a decent life is pretty repulsive. We should be making it easier for the older to continue contributing in lots of different ways for as long as possible not narrowing their horizons, physical or mental.
    Ummm... What's wrong with charging your car at home?
    I've never seen this done, not in London anyway. Unless you have a drive or off-street parking home charging is not feasible, is it?

    Unless I'm missing something.....
    It is done in London; I've seen it, albeit on quiet residential roads - big lead heading out from the house to the car, yellow box over it to prevent people or foxes kicking/messing/chewing it. But it does look exposed. Not that anyone could really do anything but it feels exposed.

    Again, super not practical or at least much more complicated if you are in shared living eg tower block, flats, etc.
  • CyclefreeCyclefree Posts: 11,538
    TOPPING said:

    Cyclefree said:

    rcs1000 said:

    Cyclefree said:

    FPT:

    Miss Cyclefree, honestly. Next you'll be opposing the proposed Logan's Run Act.

    Edited extra bit: also, good afternoon, everyone.

    For the avoidance of doubt Mr Dancer, we require you to declare that, as a historical anachronism, you do not possess a car and travel everywhere on a palanquin carried on the shoulders of six eunuchs.
    According to the map of electric charging points in the UK, the nearest one to us in Cumbria is 12 miles away, over some steep hills and fells. There are 2, both 12 miles away. Of these one has problems (as reported on the map today).

    So if people really want all petrol and diesel cars to stop being needed then a great deal more investment in electric charging points is going to be needed all over the country and not just in cities, together with cars with a better reliable range and an ability to charge quickly.

    The idea that the old should be confined to their homes and criticised for wanting a decent life is pretty repulsive. We should be making it easier for the older to continue contributing in lots of different ways for as long as possible not narrowing their horizons, physical or mental.
    Ummm... What's wrong with charging your car at home?
    I've never seen this done, not in London anyway. Unless you have a drive or off-street parking home charging is not feasible, is it?

    Unless I'm missing something.....
    It is done in London; I've seen it, albeit on quiet residential roads - big lead heading out from the house to the car, yellow box over it to prevent people or foxes kicking/messing/chewing it. But it does look exposed. Not that anyone could really do anything but it feels exposed.

    Again, super not practical or at least much more complicated if you are in shared living eg tower block, flats, etc.
    And assumes that you can park outside your house when your car needs charging. In my part of London, getting a parking space anywhere on the street counts as a triumph.

    These may be relatively minor issues but until charging your electric car is as easy and quick as it now is to go to a petrol station and fill up it is IMO going to be harder than it might be to persuade people to make the switch.
  • AndyJSAndyJS Posts: 23,788
    "How Crazy Is It That The Senate and House Might Move In Opposite Directions This Year?
    It’s weird. But it’s not unprecedented."

    https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/how-crazy-is-it-that-the-senate-and-house-might-move-in-opposite-directions-this-year/
  • Morris_DancerMorris_Dancer Posts: 46,447
    Mr. B, yes, though the account I read (admittedly Wikipedia) was that he just reproduced the design. Unless that's a reference to MkII.

    I was unaware rally chaps used them. I knew engineers and maybe architects did.

    Blogged about it a couple of months ago, for those interested: http://thaddeusthesixth.blogspot.com/2018/08/the-curta-mechanical-calculator.html
  • felixfelix Posts: 8,172
    Cyclefree said:

    Cyclefree said:

    FPT:

    Miss Cyclefree, honestly. Next you'll be opposing the proposed Logan's Run Act.

    Edited extra bit: also, good afternoon, everyone.

    For the avoidance of doubt Mr Dancer, we require you to declare that, as a historical anachronism, you do not possess a car and travel everywhere on a palanquin carried on the shoulders of six eunuchs.
    According to the map of electric charging points in the UK, the nearest one to us in Cumbria is 12 miles away, over some steep hills and fells. There are 2, both 12 miles away. Of these one has problems (as reported on the map today).

    So if people really want all petrol and diesel cars to stop being needed then a great deal more investment in electric charging points is going to be needed all over the country and not just in cities, together with cars with a better reliable range and an ability to charge quickly.

    The idea that the old should be confined to their homes and criticised for wanting a decent life is pretty repulsive. We should be making it easier for the older to continue contributing in lots of different ways for as long as possible not narrowing their horizons, physical or mental.
    Most EV charging takes place at home. Don’t you have electricity then?
    Does it? How does that work in cities then when you cannot guarantee getting a parking place outside your home? The only electric cars I've seen charging in London have been at those charge points not from homes. Do people have long cables snaking out of their homes to the car?
    It was a singularly ignorant comment - not even worth the dignity of a response.
  • RobDRobD Posts: 34,621

    Mr. B, yes, though the account I read (admittedly Wikipedia) was that he just reproduced the design. Unless that's a reference to MkII.

    I was unaware rally chaps used them. I knew engineers and maybe architects did.

    Blogged about it a couple of months ago, for those interested: http://thaddeusthesixth.blogspot.com/2018/08/the-curta-mechanical-calculator.html

    You might enjoy this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Kd3R_RlXgc
  • TOPPINGTOPPING Posts: 15,583
    Cyclefree said:

    TOPPING said:

    Cyclefree said:

    rcs1000 said:

    Cyclefree said:

    FPT:

    Miss Cyclefree, honestly. Next you'll be opposing the proposed Logan's Run Act.

    Edited extra bit: also, good afternoon, everyone.

    For the avoidance of doubt Mr Dancer, we require you to declare that, as a historical anachronism, you do not possess a car and travel everywhere on a palanquin carried on the shoulders of six eunuchs.
    According to the map of electric charging points in the UK, the nearest one to us in Cumbria is 12 miles away, over some steep hills and fells. There are 2, both 12 miles away. Of these one has problems (as reported on the map today).

    So if people really want all petrol and diesel cars to stop being needed then a great deal more investment in electric charging points is going to be needed all over the country and not just in cities, together with cars with a better reliable range and an ability to charge quickly.

    The idea that the old should be confined to their homes and criticised for wanting a decent life is pretty repulsive. We should be making it easier for the older to continue contributing in lots of different ways for as long as possible not narrowing their horizons, physical or mental.
    Ummm... What's wrong with charging your car at home?
    I've never seen this done, not in London anyway. Unless you have a drive or off-street parking home charging is not feasible, is it?

    Unless I'm missing something.....
    It is done in London; I've seen it, albeit on quiet residential roads - big lead heading out from the house to the car, yellow box over it to prevent people or foxes kicking/messing/chewing it. But it does look exposed. Not that anyone could really do anything but it feels exposed.

    Again, super not practical or at least much more complicated if you are in shared living eg tower block, flats, etc.
    And assumes that you can park outside your house when your car needs charging. In my part of London, getting a parking space anywhere on the street counts as a triumph.

    These may be relatively minor issues but until charging your electric car is as easy and quick as it now is to go to a petrol station and fill up it is IMO going to be harder than it might be to persuade people to make the switch.
    Agree completely. And there is nowhere in London where some yoot definitely won't think it funny to mess around with the lead.
  • FregglesFreggles Posts: 2,907
    Nice
  • PulpstarPulpstar Posts: 48,285
    Cyclefree said:



    And assumes that you can park outside your house when your car needs charging. In my part of London, getting a parking space anywhere on the street counts as a triumph.

    These may be relatively minor issues but until charging your electric car is as easy and quick as it now is to go to a petrol station and fill up it is IMO going to be harder than it might be to persuade people to make the switch.

    I think the simple and stark truth is that around a third of UK dwelling stock is simply unsuited to electric vehicle ownership.
    https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/6748/2173483.pdf
    Perhaps lamp-posts such as those around around Kensington are a solution. But there is no chance they'll go up quickly everywhere with all the other demands on councils.
    I used to live in Netheredge in Sheffield, which was perfectly pleasent but this abode is typicalish of the area with no practical way to charge an electric vehicle here as of yet.
    https://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-56952639.html
    I think our general dwelling stock compares very unfavourably with the USA for instance when it comes to suitability for electric vehicles due to lack of driveways and garages.
  • tpfkartpfkar Posts: 1,162
    AndyJS said:

    Cyclefree said:

    rcs1000 said:

    Cyclefree said:

    FPT:

    Miss Cyclefree, honestly. Next you'll be opposing the proposed Logan's Run Act.

    Edited extra bit: also, good afternoon, everyone.

    For the avoidance of doubt Mr Dancer, we require you to declare that, as a historical anachronism, you do not possess a car and travel everywhere on a palanquin carried on the shoulders of six eunuchs.
    According to the map of electric charging points in the UK, the nearest one to us in Cumbria is 12 miles away, over some steep hills and fells. There are 2, both 12 miles away. Of these one has problems (as reported on the map today).

    So if people really want all petrol and diesel cars to stop being needed then a great deal more investment in electric charging points is going to be needed all over the country and not just in cities, together with cars with a better reliable range and an ability to charge quickly.

    The idea that the old should be confined to their homes and criticised for wanting a decent life is pretty repulsive. We should be making it easier for the older to continue contributing in lots of different ways for as long as possible not narrowing their horizons, physical or mental.
    Ummm... What's wrong with charging your car at home?
    I've never seen this done, not in London anyway. Unless you have a drive or off-street parking home charging is not feasible, is it?

    Unless I'm missing something.....
    A significant percentage of houses in Outer London have garages where a charge point could be installed. But you're right about inner London. Most people wouldn't be able to charge where they park unless they find a communal charge point.
    We're going big on this in Milton Keynes. Charge Points springing up over the city, electric vehicles only allowed to park in the relevant spaces. Electric vehicles exempt from city centre parking charges. Government funding to roll out more charge points. And most homes with electric vehicles have home charging installed.

    However it's taken plenty of effort to get here, and our structure (urban, most estates having a single local centre, plenty of parking spaces) is probably ideal to make this work, far better than a rural or over-congested area. The real blowback has been in reserving parking spaces near schools for electric vehicles only.
  • felixfelix Posts: 8,172
    TOPPING said:

    Cyclefree said:

    TOPPING said:

    Cyclefree said:

    rcs1000 said:

    Cyclefree said:

    FPT:

    Miss Cyclefree, honestly. Next you'll be opposing the proposed Logan's Run Act.

    Edited extra bit: also, good afternoon, everyone.


    The idea that the old should be confined to their homes and criticised for wanting a decent life is pretty repulsive. We should be making it easier for the older to continue contributing in lots of different ways for as long as possible not narrowing their horizons, physical or mental.
    Ummm... What's wrong with charging your car at home?
    I've never seen this done, not in London anyway. Unless you have a drive or off-street parking home charging is not feasible, is it?

    Unless I'm missing something.....
    It is done in London; I've seen it, albeit on quiet residential roads - big lead heading out from the house to the car, yellow box over it to prevent people or foxes kicking/messing/chewing it. But it does look exposed. Not that anyone could really do anything but it feels exposed.

    Again, super not practical or at least much more complicated if you are in shared living eg tower block, flats, etc.
    And assumes that you can park outside your house when your car needs charging. In my part of London, getting a parking space anywhere on the street counts as a triumph.

    These may be relatively minor issues but until charging your electric car is as easy and quick as it now is to go to a petrol station and fill up it is IMO going to be harder than it might be to persuade people to make the switch.
    Agree completely. And there is nowhere in London where some yoot definitely won't think it funny to mess around with the lead.
    The truth is that all electric cars are nowhere near ready for the mass motoring market - in terms of power, practicality or cost. It is also true that the attack on petrol/diesel cars has become absurdly political with some of the environmental concerns massively over-hyped. I believe there may be scope for hydrogen powered cars that are more reliable and less polluting that should be at least considered before the rush to an electric solution which remains a long way off.
  • SandyRentoolSandyRentool Posts: 6,902
    Freggles said:

    Nice

    Ah, it's the name your favourite biscuit thread.

    Plain chocolate digestive.
  • AlastairMeeksAlastairMeeks Posts: 22,024

    Freggles said:

    Nice

    Ah, it's the name your favourite biscuit thread.

    Plain chocolate digestive.
    The pb biscuit of choice is the bourbon. They have learned nothing and they have forgotten nothing.
  • Beverley_CBeverley_C Posts: 5,483
    Cyclefree said:

    And assumes that you can park outside your house when your car needs charging. In my part of London, getting a parking space anywhere on the street counts as a triumph.

    These may be relatively minor issues but until charging your electric car is as easy and quick as it now is to go to a petrol station and fill up it is IMO going to be harder than it might be to persuade people to make the switch.

    I did read of one interesting idea which stated that for a fully green wind/tide powered economy, electric cars were necessary to act as a reservoir of charge.

    The idea is that the income from wind fluctuates and needs "smoothing" and storage. So your car has a giant battery that you drive around on until it is nearly flat and then you go to the "petrol station". A flap opens, your battery slides out and another (fully charged) slides in and you pay for the charge. Your old one goes into a charging bank and stores power coming off the grid. If all the batteries are full, the grid can draw power from them.

    From the consumers point of view, the attractive thing is that the current behaviour is maintained and no need for charging points. Just go and fill up...
  • rcs1000rcs1000 Posts: 23,964
    Re electrical charging points.

    We have electrical cables running down every single street in London. It is barely any more difficult to install an electrical charge point than a parking meter.

    Over the next 25 years, every urban street will be filled, end-to-end, with electrical charge points. Every supermarket parking space will have one. Every multistory or office car park.
  • Beverley_CBeverley_C Posts: 5,483
    Sean_F said:

    Sean_F said:

    FPT:

    matt said:


    Perhaps you should be asking yourself the question why you have a car at all. The entitlement culture is strong in the elderly.

    I have just seen your post. Are you real or do you live in London
    I

    Ageism is the last bastion of prejudice. It is a very interesting one though, because it is one of the few "isms" that generally gets less intense as the prejudiced individual gets older
    On that basis, I wonder how society would turn out if humans were like Swordtail fish?
    It sounds a very interesting analogy? Could you explain please
    If all the males are removed from a tank of swordtails, the oldest females turn male. Other fish can do this too (Rock Bass, IIRC, has one male per school)

    What would the position of women in society be like if some of the older males (who usually run things in patriarchal societies) had formerly spent a large portion of their lives as female?

    Would women's position in society be less inferior? Would those who transformed grasp Male Privilege with both hands and, like Borgia, "... now that we have the Papacy we mean to enjoy it..."? What would happen in places like Rwanda where half the male population died and women now enjoy a more balanced public life whilst still struggling with the same old prejudicies in their personal and family life.

    There are some examples. In Southern Italy, the Italian government carried out a major crackdown on the Camorra and N'dragheta after 2000, rounding up thousands of mobsters.. So, the mobsters' female relatives took up the killing, drug-trafficking, and extortion which their imprisoned male relatives could no longer carry out.

    Some Polynesian societies were matriarchies, where lands and titles descended through the female line, because most males died violently at an early age.

    In the absence of men, women will occupy positions that have previously been occupied by men, and act in the ways that men act.
    Interesting! Thank you :+1:
    I read one article recently, that Italian police estimate there are about 150 women in positions of leadership in organised crime, in Southern Italy. I think it's interesting that in such a traditionalist society, protecting the interests of the "family" matter far more than maintaining traditional gender roles.
    No one likes letting the family business slide.....
  • Beverley_CBeverley_C Posts: 5,483
    rcs1000 said:

    Re electrical charging points.

    We have electrical cables running down every single street in London. It is barely any more difficult to install an electrical charge point than a parking meter.

    Over the next 25 years, every urban street will be filled, end-to-end, with electrical charge points. Every supermarket parking space will have one. Every multistory or office car park.

    You will be predicting a computer in every home next :open_mouth:
  • Beverley_CBeverley_C Posts: 5,483

    Freggles said:

    Nice

    Ah, it's the name your favourite biscuit thread.

    Plain chocolate digestive.
    The pb biscuit of choice is the bourbon. They have learned nothing and they have forgotten nothing.
    Do the French get royalties :D :D :D on the biscuits?
  • Morris_DancerMorris_Dancer Posts: 46,447
    edited October 8
    Mr. D, that was a fancy calculating machine. The Curta can do divisions too, also by successive subtraction, but you have to do it by hand.

    Edited extra bit: Mr. Meeks, surely those in favour of the Treaty of Rome approve of a garibaldi?

    Edited extra bit 2: corrected some typos etc.
  • FenmanFenman Posts: 404

    rcs1000 said:

    Re electrical charging points.

    We have electrical cables running down every single street in London. It is barely any more difficult to install an electrical charge point than a parking meter.

    Over the next 25 years, every urban street will be filled, end-to-end, with electrical charge points. Every supermarket parking space will have one. Every multistory or office car park.

    You will be predicting a computer in every home next :open_mouth:
    What interests me is how governments will compensate for the loss of revenue.
  • FregglesFreggles Posts: 2,907
    Fenman said:

    rcs1000 said:

    Re electrical charging points.

    We have electrical cables running down every single street in London. It is barely any more difficult to install an electrical charge point than a parking meter.

    Over the next 25 years, every urban street will be filled, end-to-end, with electrical charge points. Every supermarket parking space will have one. Every multistory or office car park.

    You will be predicting a computer in every home next :open_mouth:
    What interests me is how governments will compensate for the loss of revenue.
    Less spending on treating asthma, COPD, etc will take the edge off but the benefit will emerge gradually.
  • llefllef Posts: 174

    rcs1000 said:

    Re electrical charging points.

    We have electrical cables running down every single street in London. It is barely any more difficult to install an electrical charge point than a parking meter.

    Over the next 25 years, every urban street will be filled, end-to-end, with electrical charge points. Every supermarket parking space will have one. Every multistory or office car park.

    You will be predicting a computer in every home next :open_mouth:
    This article from the national grid gives a good insight regarding the infrastructure problems of charging your car from home, (or from charge points down every street available to everyone to charge at the same time).

    Basically, homes can't handle the demands of fast-chargers, and neither can local electricity sub-stations. So the article sees a future of fast-charging forecourts, similar to the petrol stations of today.

    http://fes.nationalgrid.com/media/1281/forecourt-thoughts-v12.pdf
  • MikeSmithsonMikeSmithson Posts: 4,801
    edited October 8

    rcs1000 said:

    Re electrical charging points.

    We have electrical cables running down every single street in London. It is barely any more difficult to install an electrical charge point than a parking meter.

    Over the next 25 years, every urban street will be filled, end-to-end, with electrical charge points. Every supermarket parking space will have one. Every multistory or office car park.

    You will be predicting a computer in every home next :open_mouth:
    Running an electric car and using public charge points can be expensive - sometimes £8 a time. Assuming that gives you 100 miles it is probably not that much cheaper than the petrol for a my Toyota Auris Hybrid which does 60+ MPG
  • JosiasJessopJosiasJessop Posts: 22,187

    Cyclefree said:

    And assumes that you can park outside your house when your car needs charging. In my part of London, getting a parking space anywhere on the street counts as a triumph.

    These may be relatively minor issues but until charging your electric car is as easy and quick as it now is to go to a petrol station and fill up it is IMO going to be harder than it might be to persuade people to make the switch.

    I did read of one interesting idea which stated that for a fully green wind/tide powered economy, electric cars were necessary to act as a reservoir of charge.

    The idea is that the income from wind fluctuates and needs "smoothing" and storage. So your car has a giant battery that you drive around on until it is nearly flat and then you go to the "petrol station". A flap opens, your battery slides out and another (fully charged) slides in and you pay for the charge. Your old one goes into a charging bank and stores power coming off the grid. If all the batteries are full, the grid can draw power from them.

    From the consumers point of view, the attractive thing is that the current behaviour is maintained and no need for charging points. Just go and fill up...
    Tesla were looking into the automated battery swap tech, but they appear to have abandoned it:


    They also had a snake-recharger that was quite odd-looking.

    There's another interesting area, and that is inductive recharging. Amongst others, Qualcomm have been working on inductive charging of cars, which means the charging infrastructure can be below a parking space and a car can be charged without wires. Instinctively I'd say that power losses would be very large, but people I know say otherwise:

    https://www.qualcomm.com/solutions/automotive/wevc
  • logical_songlogical_song Posts: 6,538
    Pulpstar said:

    Cyclefree said:



    And assumes that you can park outside your house when your car needs charging. In my part of London, getting a parking space anywhere on the street counts as a triumph.

    These may be relatively minor issues but until charging your electric car is as easy and quick as it now is to go to a petrol station and fill up it is IMO going to be harder than it might be to persuade people to make the switch.

    I think the simple and stark truth is that around a third of UK dwelling stock is simply unsuited to electric vehicle ownership.
    https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/6748/2173483.pdf
    Perhaps lamp-posts such as those around around Kensington are a solution. But there is no chance they'll go up quickly everywhere with all the other demands on councils.
    I used to live in Netheredge in Sheffield, which was perfectly pleasent but this abode is typicalish of the area with no practical way to charge an electric vehicle here as of yet.
    https://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-56952639.html
    I think our general dwelling stock compares very unfavourably with the USA for instance when it comes to suitability for electric vehicles due to lack of driveways and garages.
    Is that a London-centric problem? Out in the sticks there are a lot of houses with garages and/or drives.
  • TheWhiteRabbitTheWhiteRabbit Posts: 8,626

    Pulpstar said:

    Cyclefree said:



    And assumes that you can park outside your house when your car needs charging. In my part of London, getting a parking space anywhere on the street counts as a triumph.

    These may be relatively minor issues but until charging your electric car is as easy and quick as it now is to go to a petrol station and fill up it is IMO going to be harder than it might be to persuade people to make the switch.

    I think the simple and stark truth is that around a third of UK dwelling stock is simply unsuited to electric vehicle ownership.
    https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/6748/2173483.pdf
    Perhaps lamp-posts such as those around around Kensington are a solution. But there is no chance they'll go up quickly everywhere with all the other demands on councils.
    I used to live in Netheredge in Sheffield, which was perfectly pleasent but this abode is typicalish of the area with no practical way to charge an electric vehicle here as of yet.
    https://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-56952639.html
    I think our general dwelling stock compares very unfavourably with the USA for instance when it comes to suitability for electric vehicles due to lack of driveways and garages.
    Is that a London-centric problem? Out in the sticks there are a lot of houses with garages and/or drives.
    but equally supply costs will be greater, and roll-outs more difficult
  • PulpstarPulpstar Posts: 48,285

    Pulpstar said:

    Cyclefree said:



    And assumes that you can park outside your house when your car needs charging. In my part of London, getting a parking space anywhere on the street counts as a triumph.

    These may be relatively minor issues but until charging your electric car is as easy and quick as it now is to go to a petrol station and fill up it is IMO going to be harder than it might be to persuade people to make the switch.

    I think the simple and stark truth is that around a third of UK dwelling stock is simply unsuited to electric vehicle ownership.
    https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/6748/2173483.pdf
    Perhaps lamp-posts such as those around around Kensington are a solution. But there is no chance they'll go up quickly everywhere with all the other demands on councils.
    I used to live in Netheredge in Sheffield, which was perfectly pleasent but this abode is typicalish of the area with no practical way to charge an electric vehicle here as of yet.
    https://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-56952639.html
    I think our general dwelling stock compares very unfavourably with the USA for instance when it comes to suitability for electric vehicles due to lack of driveways and garages.
    Is that a London-centric problem? Out in the sticks there are a lot of houses with garages and/or drives.
    I'd say it was a city problem generally rather than a London issue.
  • TheWhiteRabbitTheWhiteRabbit Posts: 8,626

    Cyclefree said:

    And assumes that you can park outside your house when your car needs charging. In my part of London, getting a parking space anywhere on the street counts as a triumph.

    These may be relatively minor issues but until charging your electric car is as easy and quick as it now is to go to a petrol station and fill up it is IMO going to be harder than it might be to persuade people to make the switch.

    I did read of one interesting idea which stated that for a fully green wind/tide powered economy, electric cars were necessary to act as a reservoir of charge.

    The idea is that the income from wind fluctuates and needs "smoothing" and storage. So your car has a giant battery that you drive around on until it is nearly flat and then you go to the "petrol station". A flap opens, your battery slides out and another (fully charged) slides in and you pay for the charge. Your old one goes into a charging bank and stores power coming off the grid. If all the batteries are full, the grid can draw power from them.

    From the consumers point of view, the attractive thing is that the current behaviour is maintained and no need for charging points. Just go and fill up...
    Tesla were looking into the automated battery swap tech, but they appear to have abandoned it:


    They also had a snake-recharger that was quite odd-looking.

    There's another interesting area, and that is inductive recharging. Amongst others, Qualcomm have been working on inductive charging of cars, which means the charging infrastructure can be below a parking space and a car can be charged without wires. Instinctively I'd say that power losses would be very large, but people I know say otherwise:

    https://www.qualcomm.com/solutions/automotive/wevc
    We've been working on wireless charging for a hundred years, and we've got to mobile-phone-on-desk level. I think it'll be a while yet...
  • JosiasJessopJosiasJessop Posts: 22,187
    And the snake charger:



    No sniggering at the back, lads ...
  • Beverley_CBeverley_C Posts: 5,483

    rcs1000 said:

    Re electrical charging points.

    We have electrical cables running down every single street in London. It is barely any more difficult to install an electrical charge point than a parking meter.

    Over the next 25 years, every urban street will be filled, end-to-end, with electrical charge points. Every supermarket parking space will have one. Every multistory or office car park.

    You will be predicting a computer in every home next :open_mouth:
    Running an electric car and using public charge points can be expensive - sometimes £8 a time. Assuming that gives you 100 miles it is probably not that much cheaper than the petrol for a my Toyota Auris Hybrid which does 60+ MPG
    :+1:

    My car is still a 100% petrol engine. I fill it up about once a month. It may not do 60 mpg but I rarely drive 60 miles anywhere.
  • JosiasJessopJosiasJessop Posts: 22,187

    Cyclefree said:

    And assumes that you can park outside your house when your car needs charging. In my part of London, getting a parking space anywhere on the street counts as a triumph.

    These may be relatively minor issues but until charging your electric car is as easy and quick as it now is to go to a petrol station and fill up it is IMO going to be harder than it might be to persuade people to make the switch.

    I did read of one interesting idea which stated that for a fully green wind/tide powered economy, electric cars were necessary to act as a reservoir of charge.

    The idea is that the income from wind fluctuates and needs "smoothing" and storage. So your car has a giant battery that you drive around on until it is nearly flat and then you go to the "petrol station". A flap opens, your battery slides out and another (fully charged) slides in and you pay for the charge. Your old one goes into a charging bank and stores power coming off the grid. If all the batteries are full, the grid can draw power from them.

    From the consumers point of view, the attractive thing is that the current behaviour is maintained and no need for charging points. Just go and fill up...
    Tesla were looking into the automated battery swap tech, but they appear to have abandoned it:


    They also had a snake-recharger that was quite odd-looking.

    There's another interesting area, and that is inductive recharging. Amongst others, Qualcomm have been working on inductive charging of cars, which means the charging infrastructure can be below a parking space and a car can be charged without wires. Instinctively I'd say that power losses would be very large, but people I know say otherwise:

    https://www.qualcomm.com/solutions/automotive/wevc
    We've been working on wireless charging for a hundred years, and we've got to mobile-phone-on-desk level. I think it'll be a while yet...
    P'haps. Then again, before the rise of mobile phones we didn't really have devices that *needed* to be charged in such a manner - most devices were relatively immobile and could be mains-fed. As there is now such a need, lots of research is being put into it where it was mostly ignored before. I can sorta see how they can get around the issues with induction, but it's blooming complex.

    The same can be said for battery tech, which was moving slowly before the mobile revolution. It's sped up, but still moving slowly ... ;)
  • GallowgateGallowgate Posts: 924
    The batteries are distributed throughout the floor of the whole car. There’s no way, using existing battery technology, of having swapable batteries.

    You would also need to maintain one common standard. It would be a nightmare.
  • williamglennwilliamglenn Posts: 23,410

    rcs1000 said:

    Re electrical charging points.

    We have electrical cables running down every single street in London. It is barely any more difficult to install an electrical charge point than a parking meter.

    Over the next 25 years, every urban street will be filled, end-to-end, with electrical charge points. Every supermarket parking space will have one. Every multistory or office car park.

    You will be predicting a computer in every home next :open_mouth:
    If only Bill Gates had the foresight to predict a computer in every pocket...
  • YBarddCwscYBarddCwsc Posts: 2,062

    As I have pointed out regularly, a remarkable number of Leavers are utterly reckless:

    How reckless to think of breaking up the country!

    And completely different from a bawling Remainer who proposed London Independence in a famous online tantrum after the Referendum, then.

    How is the London Independence Party coming on?
  • AlastairMeeksAlastairMeeks Posts: 22,024
    edited October 8

    As I have pointed out regularly, a remarkable number of Leavers are utterly reckless:

    How reckless to think of breaking up the country!

    And completely different from a bawling Remainer who proposed London Independence in a famous online tantrum after the Referendum, then.

    How is the London Independence Party coming on?
    London will not indefinitely bankroll reactionary spongers. So I suggest that instead of insulting the bit of the country that props up their prejudices, the craziest Leavers have a good long think about how they're going to reach an accommodation with it.
  • HYUFDHYUFD Posts: 48,379
    A 9.5% swing to the Democrats in these key districts should see them take House easily and suggests they are doing even better in the marginal districts than nationally where they lead by about 7%
  • TheWhiteRabbitTheWhiteRabbit Posts: 8,626

    Cyclefree said:

    And assumes that you can park outside your house when your car needs charging. In my part of London, getting a parking space anywhere on the street counts as a triumph.

    These may be relatively minor issues but until charging your electric car is as easy and quick as it now is to go to a petrol station and fill up it is IMO going to be harder than it might be to persuade people to make the switch.

    I did read of one interesting idea which stated that for a fully green wind/tide powered economy, electric cars were necessary to act as a reservoir of charge.

    The idea is that the income from wind fluctuates and needs "smoothing" and storage. So your car has a giant battery that you drive around on until it is nearly flat and then you go to the "petrol station". A flap opens, your battery slides out and another (fully charged) slides in and you pay for the charge. Your old one goes into a charging bank and stores power coming off the grid. If all the batteries are full, the grid can draw power from them.

    From the consumers point of view, the attractive thing is that the current behaviour is maintained and no need for charging points. Just go and fill up...
    Tesla were looking into the automated battery swap tech, but they appear to have abandoned it:


    They also had a snake-recharger that was quite odd-looking.

    There's another interesting area, and that is inductive recharging. Amongst others, Qualcomm have been working on inductive charging of cars, which means the charging infrastructure can be below a parking space and a car can be charged without wires. Instinctively I'd say that power losses would be very large, but people I know say otherwise:

    https://www.qualcomm.com/solutions/automotive/wevc
    We've been working on wireless charging for a hundred years, and we've got to mobile-phone-on-desk level. I think it'll be a while yet...
    P'haps. Then again, before the rise of mobile phones we didn't really have devices that *needed* to be charged in such a manner - most devices were relatively immobile and could be mains-fed. As there is now such a need, lots of research is being put into it where it was mostly ignored before. I can sorta see how they can get around the issues with induction, but it's blooming complex.

    The same can be said for battery tech, which was moving slowly before the mobile revolution. It's sped up, but still moving slowly ... ;)
    Wireless charging cars will equally be a luxury before it is a necessity, though. I do think that the electric car, charging, etc, will come on leaps and bounds.
  • logical_songlogical_song Posts: 6,538

    The batteries are distributed throughout the floor of the whole car. There’s no way, using existing battery technology, of having swapable batteries.

    You would also need to maintain one common standard. It would be a nightmare.

    Of course it could be done, easier for lorries though.
    I suspect it won't come to that, when you can get 500 miles on a charge and when charging is much quicker it won't be as much of a problem.
  • YBarddCwscYBarddCwsc Posts: 2,062

    As I have pointed out regularly, a remarkable number of Leavers are utterly reckless:

    How reckless to think of breaking up the country!

    And completely different from a bawling Remainer who proposed London Independence in a famous online tantrum after the Referendum, then.

    How is the London Independence Party coming on?
    London will not indefinitely bankroll reactionary spongers. So I suggest that instead of insulting the bit of the country that props up their prejudices, the craziest Leavers have a good long think about how they're going to reach an accommodation with it.
    When I have insulted London?

    I merely pointed out the inconsistency of your argument.
  • logical_songlogical_song Posts: 6,538

    Pulpstar said:

    Cyclefree said:



    And assumes that you can park outside your house when your car needs charging. In my part of London, getting a parking space anywhere on the street counts as a triumph.

    These may be relatively minor issues but until charging your electric car is as easy and quick as it now is to go to a petrol station and fill up it is IMO going to be harder than it might be to persuade people to make the switch.

    I think the simple and stark truth is that around a third of UK dwelling stock is simply unsuited to electric vehicle ownership.
    https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/6748/2173483.pdf
    Perhaps lamp-posts such as those around around Kensington are a solution. But there is no chance they'll go up quickly everywhere with all the other demands on councils.
    I used to live in Netheredge in Sheffield, which was perfectly pleasent but this abode is typicalish of the area with no practical way to charge an electric vehicle here as of yet.
    https://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-56952639.html
    I think our general dwelling stock compares very unfavourably with the USA for instance when it comes to suitability for electric vehicles due to lack of driveways and garages.
    Is that a London-centric problem? Out in the sticks there are a lot of houses with garages and/or drives.
    but equally supply costs will be greater, and roll-outs more difficult
    Why - electricity isn't any more expensive? In what way 'more difficult'?
  • Beverley_CBeverley_C Posts: 5,483

    rcs1000 said:

    Re electrical charging points.

    We have electrical cables running down every single street in London. It is barely any more difficult to install an electrical charge point than a parking meter.

    Over the next 25 years, every urban street will be filled, end-to-end, with electrical charge points. Every supermarket parking space will have one. Every multistory or office car park.

    You will be predicting a computer in every home next :open_mouth:
    If only Bill Gates had the foresight to predict a computer in every pocket...
    Like that would ever happen

    - Posted from my SmartWatch
  • logical_songlogical_song Posts: 6,538
    The guy who played 'Kryten' in Red Dwarf runs an interested electric car Youtube channel.
    https://www.youtube.com/user/fullychargedshow
  • Big_G_NorthWalesBig_G_NorthWales Posts: 19,460
    I see my post on climate change on the last thread and the responses has become a topic of conversation on this thread.

    While I thought the response to my post from Matt was absurd and could only come from a Londoner the discussion has broadened out somewhat and is very interesting

    The wide scale acceptance outside the Metropolitan areas requires a huge price fall and massive increase in the range. Also charging needs to be as quick as filling the tank now.

    In addition someone has going to have to explain how the Treasury replaces the huge income from fuel duty and the cost and time scale when 100% EV are on our roads when they presently account for 2%
This discussion has been closed.