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politicalbetting.com » Blog Archive » Safe as houses?

SystemSystem Posts: 8,258
edited June 22 in General

imagepoliticalbetting.com » Blog Archive » Safe as houses?

Housing has long had a special place in the Tory party’s heart. A “property owning democracy” in Mrs Thatcher’s vision. It has also proved a nightmare as the rises in interest rates, negative equity and repossessions in the 1990’s showed. Now the problem is different: people desperate to own a home (the young) are shut out by sky high prices (at least in some places), the difficulties of saving for a deposit while renting and the lack of sufficient affordable homes. The interests of existing homeowners, a sometimes impenetrable and lengthy planning system, the effects of QE inflating asset prices, the attraction of property as an “investment” for those from less secure countries and inertia have combined to make the Tories’ cherished property-owning democracy more of a chimera than it once seemed. This has not been helped by the number of Ministers dealing with this: 18 junior Ministers between 1997 – 2018. Only in January 2018 was Housing moved to the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government and given a Cabinet Minister. There have been three: Sajid Javid (for 3 months), James Brokenshire and now Robert Jenrick.

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Comments

  • IshmaelZIshmaelZ Posts: 2,538
    1st
  • rcs1000rcs1000 Posts: 31,378

    OT: "Which is better – to have people voting for you more because they dislike your opponent or specifically like you?"


    From the latest CNN poll

    https://cdn.cnn.com/cnn/2020/images/06/08/rel6a.-.race.and.2020.pdf

    2012 November 2-4

    Obama voters
    Vote for Obama / Vote against Romney / No Opinion
    80% / 18% / 2%

    Romney voters
    Vote for Romney / vote against Obama / No Opinion
    60% / 38% / 2%

    They also have other historical figures which largely confirm this relationship to the victor. Generally, it's much better to have people voting for you than against the other guy.

    I think there's a large element of "it depends" in there.

    Because I think that it ultimately depends on the depth of dislike people have for a candidate.

    Let me give you an example. Back in 1997, Martin Bell stood against Neil Hamilton in Tatton. Few people voted for Martin Bell. Lots of people voted against Neil Hamilton. And the latter lost badly.

    So, really the question is - for the 65% of the population that are not Trump's base - how much do they dislike him? Is it a lot? Or is a little?

    If you look back at 2016, both Ms Clinton and Mr Trump had really high unfavourables. But if you asked people who disliked both "if you had to vote for one of them, which would it be", then they went by large margins for Trump over Clinton.

    In Wisconsin, which Trump won by a whisker, people who disliked both Trump and Clinton, went for Trump by 37 percentage points.

    This time around, people who dislike both prefer Biden by large margins over Trump. Now maybe they won't come out to vote this time around. But if they do...

    Simply: I'm not convinced by the "Republicans" are more enthused argument. And here's why. Back in 1980, Registered Democrats were 45% of the electorate, and Registered Republicans were 40%. Just 15% were Independent. Now, fewer than 29% of voters are Registered Republicans, and Independents have just overtaken them. Enthusing a diminishing portion of the electorate, frankly, isn't enough any more.
  • Richard_TyndallRichard_Tyndall Posts: 21,517
    Good article but disappointing.

    Why?

    Because at the start I though Cyclefree was going to look at the huge issue of housing policy rather than the more prosaic issue of a dodgy Conservative Minister who should have been out of his job weeks ago.

    Obviously the latter is still important and I think the article nails it very well. But I would so much rather have read about how to fix our long term housing issues.
  • tlg86tlg86 Posts: 14,157

    Good article but disappointing.

    Why?

    Because at the start I though Cyclefree was going to look at the huge issue of housing policy rather than the more prosaic issue of a dodgy Conservative Minister who should have been out of his job weeks ago.

    Obviously the latter is still important and I think the article nails it very well. But I would so much rather have read about how to fix our long term housing issues.

    If interest rates hadn't remained at rock bottom for the last decade, then perhaps the whole % of affordable housing thing wouldn't have been required.
  • rottenboroughrottenborough Posts: 33,797
    Four authors represented by JK Rowling’s literary agency have resigned after accusing the company of declining to issue a public statement of support for transgender rights.

    Fox Fisher, Drew Davies and Ugla Stefanía Kristjönudóttir Jónsdóttir said they could no longer work with the Blair Partnership, the London-based agency that represents all aspects of the Harry Potter author’s work, because they were not convinced the company “supports our rights at all avenues”.

    A spokeswoman said it would always champion diverse voices and believe in freedom of speech for all but it was not willing to have staff “re-educated” to meet the demands of a small group of clients.

    (Guardian)
  • contrariancontrarian Posts: 1,589
    Anybody know what's really happening to house prices since we resumed buying and selling?
  • Luckyguy1983Luckyguy1983 Posts: 11,579

    Good article but disappointing.

    Why?

    Because at the start I though Cyclefree was going to look at the huge issue of housing policy rather than the more prosaic issue of a dodgy Conservative Minister who should have been out of his job weeks ago.

    Obviously the latter is still important and I think the article nails it very well. But I would so much rather have read about how to fix our long term housing issues.

    :lol: Me too.

    I don't blame it for being more in the usual @Cyclefree ouvre though, but yes, I was expecting a thundering manifesto to clear the slums, demolish the tower blocks, and ensure every English(wo)man (and Scottish, Welsh and Northern Irish :wink: ) had a home to call a castle.
  • stodgestodge Posts: 6,897
    Evening all :)

    Thank you for the thread topic, @Cyclefree and I'm sure Robert Jenrick will have plenty of acceptable and credible answers when these questions are put to him.

    He's got plenty of time on his side - even if the Tories are out for 15 years after the next election, he'll be in his mid-50s so a leadership bid - why not?

    On other matters, I see Boris "Good News" Johnson is lining up to provide us with more good cheer tomorrow with a further easing of restrictions. It's so much easier when it's good news being dished out rather than bad - he's learnt that from Sunak. Everyone loves you if you are saying what they want to hear.

    Now, to be fair, and I try to be, I'm going to say something I didn't think I would say.

    I think the British people have done pretty damn well dealing with Covid-19.

    Hindsight is 20/20 and we all wish sometimes we could do back and do things differently. More than 60,000 have died and that is frankly terrible but in spite of mixed and occasionally contradictory guidance from Government and science most people have behaved responsibly and appropriately through this crisis and kudos to us all.

    I'm deeply sorry for those who have lost loved ones and for those whose health continues to be blighted by this terrible virus and I fully understand why many remain nervous and fearful. No one can fault the heroism of the NHS and so many public and private sector workers who have performed above and beyond when the country needed them. I'd single out road haulage - brilliant, just brilliant.

    We all deserve a pat on the back - I've tried but I've tweaked my shoulder.
  • tlg86tlg86 Posts: 14,157

    Anybody know what's really happening to house prices since we resumed buying and selling?

    And also transaction volumes. I think we might be surprised at the resilience of the market to begin with.
  • Andy_JSAndy_JS Posts: 6,037

    Four authors represented by JK Rowling’s literary agency have resigned after accusing the company of declining to issue a public statement of support for transgender rights.

    Fox Fisher, Drew Davies and Ugla Stefanía Kristjönudóttir Jónsdóttir said they could no longer work with the Blair Partnership, the London-based agency that represents all aspects of the Harry Potter author’s work, because they were not convinced the company “supports our rights at all avenues”.

    A spokeswoman said it would always champion diverse voices and believe in freedom of speech for all but it was not willing to have staff “re-educated” to meet the demands of a small group of clients.

    (Guardian)

    Why not just accept that people have different opinions?
  • Casino_RoyaleCasino_Royale Posts: 35,920
    Andy_JS said:

    Four authors represented by JK Rowling’s literary agency have resigned after accusing the company of declining to issue a public statement of support for transgender rights.

    Fox Fisher, Drew Davies and Ugla Stefanía Kristjönudóttir Jónsdóttir said they could no longer work with the Blair Partnership, the London-based agency that represents all aspects of the Harry Potter author’s work, because they were not convinced the company “supports our rights at all avenues”.

    A spokeswoman said it would always champion diverse voices and believe in freedom of speech for all but it was not willing to have staff “re-educated” to meet the demands of a small group of clients.

    (Guardian)

    Why not just accept that people have different opinions?
    Because they're worried their ones then won't win out.

    It's the same reason communists didn't want democracy in Eastern European countries during the cold war: they knew they wouldn't win the elections.
  • FloaterFloater Posts: 10,905
    Andy_JS said:

    Four authors represented by JK Rowling’s literary agency have resigned after accusing the company of declining to issue a public statement of support for transgender rights.

    Fox Fisher, Drew Davies and Ugla Stefanía Kristjönudóttir Jónsdóttir said they could no longer work with the Blair Partnership, the London-based agency that represents all aspects of the Harry Potter author’s work, because they were not convinced the company “supports our rights at all avenues”.

    A spokeswoman said it would always champion diverse voices and believe in freedom of speech for all but it was not willing to have staff “re-educated” to meet the demands of a small group of clients.

    (Guardian)

    Why not just accept that people have different opinions?
    The left seem to be moving away from that idea
  • FrankBoothFrankBooth Posts: 4,176
    Does anyone know how Jenrick made his fortune?
  • Casino_RoyaleCasino_Royale Posts: 35,920

    Good article but disappointing.

    Why?

    Because at the start I though Cyclefree was going to look at the huge issue of housing policy rather than the more prosaic issue of a dodgy Conservative Minister who should have been out of his job weeks ago.

    Obviously the latter is still important and I think the article nails it very well. But I would so much rather have read about how to fix our long term housing issues.

    To be fair, it's her area of expertise - and she's very good at it.
  • CyclefreeCyclefree Posts: 17,766

    Good article but disappointing.

    Why?

    Because at the start I though Cyclefree was going to look at the huge issue of housing policy rather than the more prosaic issue of a dodgy Conservative Minister who should have been out of his job weeks ago.

    Obviously the latter is still important and I think the article nails it very well. But I would so much rather have read about how to fix our long term housing issues.

    I didn’t write such an article because I don’t have the answers. Also because I was at the start of my career involved in a case very similar to this one so it intrigued me how Jenrick could have got it so very wrong - and why. Plus my other half is a planning barrister and has a professional interest in this sort of stuff so we were discussing it yesterday.

    There is a theme of contempt for law and due process in this government which really worries me. I am keeping a beady eye on them.
  • Casino_RoyaleCasino_Royale Posts: 35,920
    FPT - this is a fascinating 40-minute interview. Yes, it's 8 months old, but it's no less fresh for that - the quality of the interviewer and interviewee is excellent. Well worth your time to watch in full:



    What's particularly interesting about it is that it featured on PoliticsJoe, which has a very left-ish tinge. However, Oli Dugmore, the interviewer, allows Douglas Murray to develop his arguments, listens to what he has to say, gently challenges him on some of it, and reflects on and considers some of his points - you can see him doing it.

    It's very good. No interruptions. No point scoring. It's a sad reminder of how good political interviews used to be.

    I think Douglas Murray got fairer treatment here than he would have done on Newsnight or Channel 4 news.

    Full respect to Oli Dugmore.
  • MightyAlexMightyAlex Posts: 196
    edited June 22
    Nor do I think Jenrick will go.

    Yesterday the odds were ~4 on 'next cabinet minister to resign'. I cannot see it happening. They will just bluff it out.

    I mean why even bother resigning just to be rehired a little later. Skip the charade, stay in post and celebrate with previous 'disgraced cabinet minister's', Williamson and Patel.

  • brokenwheelbrokenwheel Posts: 3,130
    edited June 22
    rcs1000 said:

    OT: "Which is better – to have people voting for you more because they dislike your opponent or specifically like you?"


    From the latest CNN poll

    https://cdn.cnn.com/cnn/2020/images/06/08/rel6a.-.race.and.2020.pdf

    2012 November 2-4

    Obama voters
    Vote for Obama / Vote against Romney / No Opinion
    80% / 18% / 2%

    Romney voters
    Vote for Romney / vote against Obama / No Opinion
    60% / 38% / 2%

    They also have other historical figures which largely confirm this relationship to the victor. Generally, it's much better to have people voting for you than against the other guy.

    I think there's a large element of "it depends" in there.

    Because I think that it ultimately depends on the depth of dislike people have for a candidate.

    Let me give you an example. Back in 1997, Martin Bell stood against Neil Hamilton in Tatton. Few people voted for Martin Bell. Lots of people voted against Neil Hamilton. And the latter lost badly.

    So, really the question is - for the 65% of the population that are not Trump's base - how much do they dislike him? Is it a lot? Or is a little?

    If you look back at 2016, both Ms Clinton and Mr Trump had really high unfavourables. But if you asked people who disliked both "if you had to vote for one of them, which would it be", then they went by large margins for Trump over Clinton.

    In Wisconsin, which Trump won by a whisker, people who disliked both Trump and Clinton, went for Trump by 37 percentage points.

    This time around, people who dislike both prefer Biden by large margins over Trump. Now maybe they won't come out to vote this time around. But if they do...

    Simply: I'm not convinced by the "Republicans" are more enthused argument. And here's why. Back in 1980, Registered Democrats were 45% of the electorate, and Registered Republicans were 40%. Just 15% were Independent. Now, fewer than 29% of voters are Registered Republicans, and Independents have just overtaken them. Enthusing a diminishing portion of the electorate, frankly, isn't enough any more.
    It's a fair question about depth of dislike, I'd like to see more evidence of its predictive effect. I've noticed from the recent polls that Trumps favourable/unfavourable figures haven't moved that much though. I'll dig some up.

    I don't see what registration has to do with anything since the question is of all voters for a given candidate, irrespective of Rep/Dem/Ind registration.

    Latest Fox poll
    https://static.foxnews.com/foxnews.com/content/uploads/2020/06/Fox_June-13-16-2020_National_Topline_June-18-Release.pdf

    When you think about voting for president this year, which is the bigger motivation?

    Enthusiasm for your candidate to win / Fear the other / candidate might win / (Don’t know)

    13-16 Jun 20 [overall] 41% / 51% / 9%

    Biden supporters 31% / 63% / 5%
    Trump supporters 62% / 33% /5%

    27-29 Sep 16 [overall] 38% / 57% / 5%

    Clinton supporters 44% / 54% / 2%
    Trump supporters 35% / 61% / 4%

    Are Trump voters answering polls right now really that different to Trump voters 4 years ago so as to explain away the change in numbers?
  • Apple transitioning away from Intel to ARM
  • CyclefreeCyclefree Posts: 17,766

    Does anyone know how Jenrick made his fortune?

    That is an interesting question and I have not been able to find an answer. In 2009, as a just qualified solicitor - even one working at Skadden Arps, which pays top dollar - he was able to buy a £1 mio house. He does not come from a wealthy background, as far as I can tell. But who knows? For all we know he could have won the lottery.
  • algarkirkalgarkirk Posts: 1,696

    Four authors represented by JK Rowling’s literary agency have resigned after accusing the company of declining to issue a public statement of support for transgender rights.

    Fox Fisher, Drew Davies and Ugla Stefanía Kristjönudóttir Jónsdóttir said they could no longer work with the Blair Partnership, the London-based agency that represents all aspects of the Harry Potter author’s work, because they were not convinced the company “supports our rights at all avenues”.

    A spokeswoman said it would always champion diverse voices and believe in freedom of speech for all but it was not willing to have staff “re-educated” to meet the demands of a small group of clients.

    (Guardian)

    What's the point of writers who don't really from their hearts believe in the freedom of other writers to think and write stuff they don't agree with? What on earth would writing be for in such a world?

  • FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 46,935
    edited June 22

    FPT - this is a fascinating 40-minute interview. Yes, it's 8 months old, but it's no less fresh for that - the quality of the interviewer and interviewee is excellent. Well worth your time to watch in full:



    What's particularly interesting about it is that it featured on PoliticsJoe, which has a very left-ish tinge. However, Oli Dugmore, the interviewer, allows Douglas Murray to develop his arguments, listens to what he has to say, gently challenges him on some of it, and reflects on and considers some of his points - you can see him doing it.

    It's very good. No interruptions. No point scoring. It's a sad reminder of how good political interviews used to be.

    I think Douglas Murray got fairer treatment here than he would have done on Newsnight or Channel 4 news.

    Full respect to Oli Dugmore.

    There is a growing niche on the YouTube for these type of interviews. Unfortunately, on the MSM, it is all about the gotchas these days.
  • logical_songlogical_song Posts: 8,382
    If that is correct then apart from "Jenrick to spend a bit more time in his many houses", he should spend more time with his family.
  • logical_songlogical_song Posts: 8,382

    Apple transitioning away from Intel to ARM

    ... for their computers as well as iPhones.
  • rottenboroughrottenborough Posts: 33,797


    There are going to voters Donald. And you don't like voters do you?
  • CyclefreeCyclefree Posts: 17,766


    No 10 protecting its back not Jenrick’s.
  • Ave_itAve_it Posts: 2,215
    Good to see shielding come to an end on 31 July. Apart from Wales. Hope Drakeford can bring it into line rather than 16 Aug
  • rottenboroughrottenborough Posts: 33,797
    algarkirk said:

    Four authors represented by JK Rowling’s literary agency have resigned after accusing the company of declining to issue a public statement of support for transgender rights.

    Fox Fisher, Drew Davies and Ugla Stefanía Kristjönudóttir Jónsdóttir said they could no longer work with the Blair Partnership, the London-based agency that represents all aspects of the Harry Potter author’s work, because they were not convinced the company “supports our rights at all avenues”.

    A spokeswoman said it would always champion diverse voices and believe in freedom of speech for all but it was not willing to have staff “re-educated” to meet the demands of a small group of clients.

    (Guardian)

    What's the point of writers who don't really from their hearts believe in the freedom of other writers to think and write stuff they don't agree with? What on earth would writing be for in such a world?

    Yep.

    Plus given how incredibly hard it is to get an agent as a writer, I'm sure these three slots will be taken up very quickly.
  • brokenwheelbrokenwheel Posts: 3,130
    edited June 22


    There are going to voters Donald. And you don't like voters do you?

    He can't hear you.
  • IshmaelZIshmaelZ Posts: 2,538
    Cyclefree said:



    No 10 protecting its back not Jenrick’s.
    Isn't "no involvement" a denial of collective responsibility?
  • contrariancontrarian Posts: 1,589

    Apple transitioning away from Intel to ARM

    ... for their computers as well as iPhones.
    Good for the UK Technology Industry?

  • rottenboroughrottenborough Posts: 33,797

    Apple transitioning away from Intel to ARM

    Apple silicon.

  • MexicanpeteMexicanpete Posts: 4,289

    Nor do I think Jenrick will go.

    Yesterday the odds were ~4 on 'next cabinet minister to resign'. I cannot see it happening. They will just bluff it out.

    I mean why even bother resigning just to be rehired a little later. Skip the charade, stay in post and celebrate with previous 'disgraced cabinet minister's', Williamson and Patel.

    ...and Johnson.
  • MattWMattW Posts: 3,738

    Four authors represented by JK Rowling’s literary agency have resigned after accusing the company of declining to issue a public statement of support for transgender rights.

    Fox Fisher, Drew Davies and Ugla Stefanía Kristjönudóttir Jónsdóttir said they could no longer work with the Blair Partnership, the London-based agency that represents all aspects of the Harry Potter author’s work, because they were not convinced the company “supports our rights at all avenues”.

    A spokeswoman said it would always champion diverse voices and believe in freedom of speech for all but it was not willing to have staff “re-educated” to meet the demands of a small group of clients.

    (Guardian)

    When asserting their rights involves trampling on what other people believe are *their* rights, there perhaps needs to be a conversation not a flounce.

    Interestingly alliterative names, though.

    (Aside: what happens to Icelandic surnames in a polyamorous relationship?)
  • Beibheirli_CBeibheirli_C Posts: 3,286

    Apple transitioning away from Intel to ARM

    ... for their computers as well as iPhones.
    Good for the UK Technology Industry?

    No. The Japanese bought ARM a year or two back. They own it now.
  • contrariancontrarian Posts: 1,589

    Apple transitioning away from Intel to ARM

    ... for their computers as well as iPhones.
    Good for the UK Technology Industry?

    No. The Japanese bought ARM a year or two back. They own it now.
    Yebbut they are still based in the UK right? wasn;t there some sort of kerfuffle about that?
  • MattWMattW Posts: 3,738
    edited June 22
    Agree on Jenrick.

    When they lost the High Court action on the PP by Tower Hamlets, the Ministerial reason for caving was based on admission of appearance of bias, which I think is code for 'looks stinky, but doesn't actually stink:

    "A consent order approved by the planning court said: “The first defendant [secretary of state] accepts that the decision letter was unlawful by reason of apparent bias and should be quashed.”

    @Cyclefree, I think the account is not quite correct. Probably not that material to the basic point though.

    Liability for CiL becomes active at commencement of development. Granting of PP establishes the liability to be paid later.

    In 5 above no liability had been established at the 14 January, as no PP existed - so no payment could be due. What they came in just ahead of was Tower Hamlets voting to implement their proposals for CiL (previous approved by the Govt) so that all future relevant PPs granted after that date would become liable.

    So if Mr J had not approved the PP then that one or a future one would be processed after the CiL had become active (and presumably affordables etc or the quality or density of the housing would have been adjusted to generate the £40 million or whatever amount was due).

  • FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 46,935
    edited June 22
    Just received an email from my dentist (private) saying £7 surcharge for a check up, £35 surcharge for aerosol generating work to cover PPE cost. That is seriously steep charges, I imagine a lot of people won't be able to afford that.
  • Northern_AlNorthern_Al Posts: 139
    Cyclefree said:

    Good article but disappointing.

    Why?

    Because at the start I though Cyclefree was going to look at the huge issue of housing policy rather than the more prosaic issue of a dodgy Conservative Minister who should have been out of his job weeks ago.

    Obviously the latter is still important and I think the article nails it very well. But I would so much rather have read about how to fix our long term housing issues.

    I didn’t write such an article because I don’t have the answers. Also because I was at the start of my career involved in a case very similar to this one so it intrigued me how Jenrick could have got it so very wrong - and why. Plus my other half is a planning barrister and has a professional interest in this sort of stuff so we were discussing it yesterday.

    There is a theme of contempt for law and due process in this government which really worries me. I am keeping a beady eye on them.
    Quite agree with this comment, and the article. Under the cover of Covid, BLM, terrorism, Trump and so forth, malpractice such as Jenrick's is likely to go unnoticed/under-reported and therefore unpunished if not highlighted. There's just so much news at the moment!
    The standard bearers of this government do have some previous in riding roughshod over legal, constitutional and ethical considerations. Looks like Jenrick should go, but won't. Mind you, Conor Burns's crime has already been forgotten it seems, and his behaviour was so disgraceful he should have had the Tory whip removed.
  • Big_G_NorthWalesBig_G_NorthWales Posts: 33,816

    Just received an email from my dentist (private) saying £7 surcharge for a check up, £35 surcharge for aerosol generating work to cover PPE cost. That is seriously steep charges, I imagine a lot of people won't be able to afford that.

    Is that through Denplan ?
  • FrankBoothFrankBooth Posts: 4,176
    Doing a bit of digging Jenrick's wife is 8 years older than he is. Perhaps it was a joint mortgage or she is the wealthy one?
  • FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 46,935
    edited June 22

    Just received an email from my dentist (private) saying £7 surcharge for a check up, £35 surcharge for aerosol generating work to cover PPE cost. That is seriously steep charges, I imagine a lot of people won't be able to afford that.

    Is that through Denplan ?
    No, just a private dental practice making their patients aware of the additional charges. It isn't a particularly fancy place.
  • Beibheirli_CBeibheirli_C Posts: 3,286

    Apple transitioning away from Intel to ARM

    ... for their computers as well as iPhones.
    Good for the UK Technology Industry?

    No. The Japanese bought ARM a year or two back. They own it now.
    Yebbut they are still based in the UK right? wasn;t there some sort of kerfuffle about that?
    Arm Holdings only does design and intellectual property, the fabrication is done under licence by the usual fabricators.

    The global head office is in Cambridgeshire but the other head office is in California
  • rkrkrkrkrkrk Posts: 6,123
    Great piece and well argued. Does feel like Boris has managed to ensure a particularly high level of dishonesty in his Cabinet.
  • Scott_xPScott_xP Posts: 3,599

    Just received an email from my dentist (private) saying £7 surcharge for a check up, £35 surcharge for aerosol generating work to cover PPE cost. That is seriously steep charges, I imagine a lot of people won't be able to afford that.

    I got a phone call with the same message. Longer appointment, fewer appointments, no hygienist and dentist back to back, surcharges.

    It will be inreresting
  • Big_G_NorthWalesBig_G_NorthWales Posts: 33,816
    edited June 22

    Just received an email from my dentist (private) saying £7 surcharge for a check up, £35 surcharge for aerosol generating work to cover PPE cost. That is seriously steep charges, I imagine a lot of people won't be able to afford that.

    Is that through Denplan ?
    No, just a private dental practice making their patients aware of the additional charges. It isn't a particularly fancy place.
    Thanks.

    My wife and I have been in Denplan for years and they are very good

    They paid for a repair to a filling in New Zealand, an emergency repair for my wife in Uxbridge just before we flew to Canada, and repair to my crown which fell out on my way to Heathrow 2 years ago

    As well as most general treatment
  • SurreySurrey Posts: 190
    edited June 22
    Donald Trump says his niece Mary is "not allowed" to write a book about the family.

    Those are the same two words used by Trump's first cousin on the Isle of Lewis in Scotland.

    "(Donald) Trump is now looking into legal action amid reports she signed a non-disclosure agreement in 2001 banning her from talking about their relationship, according to The Daily Beast." ("Their relationship" here probably means Trump's with his father, Mary's grandfather.)

    Haha - legal action! Good luck with that!
  • CyclefreeCyclefree Posts: 17,766
    IshmaelZ said:

    Cyclefree said:



    No 10 protecting its back not Jenrick’s.
    Isn't "no involvement" a denial of collective responsibility?
    Technically collective responsibility applies to Cabinet decisions, to political ones. A quasi-judicial decision would perhaps be regarded differently since by its very nature it should not be political.

    But the shorter answer is: Boris? Collective responsibility? Hahahahahaha.....
  • Scott_xPScott_xP Posts: 3,599
    rkrkrk said:

    Great piece and well argued. Does feel like Boris has managed to ensure a particularly high level of dishonesty in his Cabinet.

    None of them can take the moral high ground...

    If Jenrick does get the boot, the questions about Cummings will start again.
  • rcs1000rcs1000 Posts: 31,378

    Apple transitioning away from Intel to ARM

    ... for their computers as well as iPhones.
    Good for the UK Technology Industry?

    No. The Japanese bought ARM a year or two back. They own it now.
    Yebbut they are still based in the UK right? wasn;t there some sort of kerfuffle about that?
    They are. ARM Is still very much a Cambridge company.

    That being said... this isn't really a big deal for ARM (except in terms of credibility), because of the nature of the relationship they have with Apple.

    So, ARM sells two types of licenses:

    1. You can buy their designs, make the chips yourself (with their designs), and you pay a small price per unit you ship. This is the model that most of the world uses.

    2. You can buy an "architectural license", which is a one off fee, to use their architecture, and then you design your own chips.

    Most ARM chips that you'll find in (non-Apple) phones are based around ARM's own designs and people like Qualcomm or Samsung or Mediatek just add a few things to their designs.

    Architectural licenses, where you design your own chips to ARM's standards, are less common, and there's no "per unit" element. Apple designs its own chips to ARM's standards. So the benefit to ARM financially from this is probably pretty small.
  • NigelbNigelb Posts: 22,337

    Apple transitioning away from Intel to ARM

    Apple silicon.

    Yes, it would be more accurate to say that Apple are transitioning from Intel to Apple. The chips, though using ARM IP, and probably fabbed by TSMC, are proprietary to them.
    Not so unusual these days - even Tesla has its own chips.
  • SurreySurrey Posts: 190



    There are going to voters Donald. And you don't like voters do you?
    When the tables are turned, bullies become crybabies - shocker.
  • contrariancontrarian Posts: 1,589
    rcs1000 said:

    Apple transitioning away from Intel to ARM

    ... for their computers as well as iPhones.
    Good for the UK Technology Industry?

    No. The Japanese bought ARM a year or two back. They own it now.
    Yebbut they are still based in the UK right? wasn;t there some sort of kerfuffle about that?
    They are. ARM Is still very much a Cambridge company.

    That being said... this isn't really a big deal for ARM (except in terms of credibility), because of the nature of the relationship they have with Apple.

    So, ARM sells two types of licenses:

    1. You can buy their designs, make the chips yourself (with their designs), and you pay a small price per unit you ship. This is the model that most of the world uses.

    2. You can buy an "architectural license", which is a one off fee, to use their architecture, and then you design your own chips.

    Most ARM chips that you'll find in (non-Apple) phones are based around ARM's own designs and people like Qualcomm or Samsung or Mediatek just add a few things to their designs.

    Architectural licenses, where you design your own chips to ARM's standards, are less common, and there's no "per unit" element. Apple designs its own chips to ARM's standards. So the benefit to ARM financially from this is probably pretty small.
    Interesting and thanks for your detailed reply.
  • NickPalmerNickPalmer Posts: 14,577

    FPT - this is a fascinating 40-minute interview. Yes, it's 8 months old, but it's no less fresh for that - the quality of the interviewer and interviewee is excellent. Well worth your time to watch in full:



    What's particularly interesting about it is that it featured on PoliticsJoe, which has a very left-ish tinge. However, Oli Dugmore, the interviewer, allows Douglas Murray to develop his arguments, listens to what he has to say, gently challenges him on some of it, and reflects on and considers some of his points - you can see him doing it.

    It's very good. No interruptions. No point scoring. It's a sad reminder of how good political interviews used to be.

    I think Douglas Murray got fairer treatment here than he would have done on Newsnight or Channel 4 news.

    Full respect to Oli Dugmore.

    There is a growing niche on the YouTube for these type of interviews. Unfortunately, on the MSM, it is all about the gotchas these days.
    I've not watched the interview and don't know the channel, but i agree with the sentiments. It's an odd thing that Britain is, I think the only country in Europe where all the maintstream print media is strongly biased - I'm familiar with the press in eight countries and although they all have Sun-like gotcha papers, the broadsheets make a serious effort to appear balanced and give everyone a hearing.

    TV takes its style from this, I think, and the belief that you gain audience by being combative and making every interview into a battle. And perhaps it's true - it's hard to explain the popularity of the Paxman genre otherwise. But it doesn't appeal to me - like Casino I'd rather the interviewer explored the opinions of the subject, including politely asking difficult questions, and let the viewers - generally consenting adults - make their own minds up.
  • CyclefreeCyclefree Posts: 17,766
    MattW said:

    Agree on Jenrick.

    When they lost the High Court action on the PP by Tower Hamlets, the Ministerial reason for caving was based on admission of appearance of bias, which I think is code for 'looks stinky, but doesn't actually stink:

    "A consent order approved by the planning court said: “The first defendant [secretary of state] accepts that the decision letter was unlawful by reason of apparent bias and should be quashed.”

    @Cyclefree, I think the account is not quite correct. Probably not that material to the basic point though.

    Liability for CiL becomes active at commencement of development. Granting of PP establishes the liability to be paid later.

    In 5 above no liability had been established at the 14 January, as no PP existed - so no payment could be due. What they came in just ahead of was Tower Hamlets voting to implement their proposals for CiL (previous approved by the Govt) so that all future relevant PPs granted after that date would become liable.

    So if Mr J had not approved the PP then that one or a future one would be processed after the CiL had become active (and presumably affordables etc or the quality or density of the housing would have been adjusted to generate the £40 million or whatever amount was due).

    Thanks. Point taken. I was trying to summarise a complicated issue without getting too legalistic. It appears from some of the stuff I’ve read that Jenrick was saying that his decision needed to be made before the CiL came into being, which I don’t really understand. Second, the consent order was done on the basis that the Minister accepted that the coincidence of the dates made it look as if there might be bias.

    But that seems to me to be a diversion from the fact that at least from the date of the November dinner, the Minister was potentially compromised. So it raises to me the issue of whether the Minister caved in when challenged in order to avoid the fact of that dinner coming out.

    At any event, the story stinks.

  • TheScreamingEaglesTheScreamingEagles Posts: 82,437
    edited June 22
    If Robert Jenrick was a councillor he'd be facing some very serious consequences, and that's no euphemism.
  • JohnOJohnO Posts: 3,716
    It just beggars belief that Desmond and three of his top people on this scheme were all sat at this table on the off chance that ‘their’ Cabinet Minister for the dinner would be Jenrick. Boy, did they strike it lucky. But doubtless they would have done the same if they’d landed Gavin Williamson, Anne Marie Trevelyian or Alok Sharma.

    Anyway, Labour are devoting their Opposition Day to this on Wednesday. Will the hapless Chris Pincher again be sent in to bat while Jenrick furtively lurks in the tea room?
  • MaxPBMaxPB Posts: 19,536

    Apple transitioning away from Intel to ARM

    ... for their computers as well as iPhones.
    Good for the UK Technology Industry?

    No. The Japanese bought ARM a year or two back. They own it now.
    Son/SoftBank have made so many bad bets that I wouldn't be surprised if they had to float it again to raise capital to cover losses in other parts of the business.
  • FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 46,935
    edited June 22

    FPT - this is a fascinating 40-minute interview. Yes, it's 8 months old, but it's no less fresh for that - the quality of the interviewer and interviewee is excellent. Well worth your time to watch in full:



    What's particularly interesting about it is that it featured on PoliticsJoe, which has a very left-ish tinge. However, Oli Dugmore, the interviewer, allows Douglas Murray to develop his arguments, listens to what he has to say, gently challenges him on some of it, and reflects on and considers some of his points - you can see him doing it.

    It's very good. No interruptions. No point scoring. It's a sad reminder of how good political interviews used to be.

    I think Douglas Murray got fairer treatment here than he would have done on Newsnight or Channel 4 news.

    Full respect to Oli Dugmore.

    There is a growing niche on the YouTube for these type of interviews. Unfortunately, on the MSM, it is all about the gotchas these days.
    I've not watched the interview and don't know the channel, but i agree with the sentiments. It's an odd thing that Britain is, I think the only country in Europe where all the maintstream print media is strongly biased - I'm familiar with the press in eight countries and although they all have Sun-like gotcha papers, the broadsheets make a serious effort to appear balanced and give everyone a hearing.

    TV takes its style from this, I think, and the belief that you gain audience by being combative and making every interview into a battle. And perhaps it's true - it's hard to explain the popularity of the Paxman genre otherwise. But it doesn't appeal to me - like Casino I'd rather the interviewer explored the opinions of the subject, including politely asking difficult questions, and let the viewers - generally consenting adults - make their own minds up.
    I have quite enjoyed the unherd lockdownTV interviews. The host always seems well briefed, asks pertinent questions and allows the intervewee the space to explain their position and for the viewer to really make their own mind up.

    They have had on shall we say the establishment in Neil Ferguson, to an opposing view via members of "independent sage", right through to the more far out academic view.
  • JohnOJohnO Posts: 3,716

    If Robert Jenrick was a councillor he'd be facing some very serious consequences, and that's no euphemism.

    More like prosecution for misconduct in public office.
  • AnabobazinaAnabobazina Posts: 3,643
    Will Bozza do his pub announcement tomorrow over a pint in a sunny beer garden I wonder?
  • IshmaelZIshmaelZ Posts: 2,538
    edited June 22
    Cyclefree said:

    IshmaelZ said:

    Cyclefree said:



    No 10 protecting its back not Jenrick’s.
    Isn't "no involvement" a denial of collective responsibility?
    Technically collective responsibility applies to Cabinet decisions, to political ones. A quasi-judicial decision would perhaps be regarded differently since by its very nature it should not be political.

    But the shorter answer is: Boris? Collective responsibility? Hahahahahaha.....
    Thanks.

    It looks a pretty brutal disavowal of Jenrick, anyway.
  • CyclefreeCyclefree Posts: 17,766

    Doing a bit of digging Jenrick's wife is 8 years older than he is. Perhaps it was a joint mortgage or she is the wealthy one?

    That’s one hell of a mortgage to take on - especially in 2009. Plus he bought 2 other houses in London.

    But yes his wife may be rich.

    I put that in because it is such a contrast with so many other 27 year olds unable to buy anything at all, let alone a Grade 1 listed house, and the casual acceptance that the number of affordable houses could be reduced - in a city where affordability is a very real issue.
  • FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 46,935
    MaxPB said:

    Apple transitioning away from Intel to ARM

    ... for their computers as well as iPhones.
    Good for the UK Technology Industry?

    No. The Japanese bought ARM a year or two back. They own it now.
    Son/SoftBank have made so many bad bets that I wouldn't be surprised if they had to float it again to raise capital to cover losses in other parts of the business.
    WeWork says hello :-)
  • TheScreamingEaglesTheScreamingEagles Posts: 82,437
    JohnO said:

    If Robert Jenrick was a councillor he'd be facing some very serious consequences, and that's no euphemism.

    More like prosecution for misconduct in public office.
    Indeed. I know a few councillors of all stripes fuming at this, where they have recused themselves because they've been at the same event as a person making an application.

    I know there's a pandemic on but this is still a big issue, someone at Downing Street or CCHQ must know this is going to get very messy.
  • AlistairAlistair Posts: 14,933
    Could have been worse, could have given it to woke leftists

  • MaxPBMaxPB Posts: 19,536

    MaxPB said:

    Apple transitioning away from Intel to ARM

    ... for their computers as well as iPhones.
    Good for the UK Technology Industry?

    No. The Japanese bought ARM a year or two back. They own it now.
    Son/SoftBank have made so many bad bets that I wouldn't be surprised if they had to float it again to raise capital to cover losses in other parts of the business.
    WeWork says hello :-)
    It's not just WeWork. Loads of vision fund bets have gone really badly.
  • AlistairAlistair Posts: 14,933

    If Robert Jenrick was a councillor he'd be facing some very serious consequences, and that's no euphemism.

    For getting caught and ruining it for everyone else?
  • AlistairAlistair Posts: 14,933



    There are going to voters Donald. And you don't like voters do you?
    Given Trump's non stop projection I am genuinely in fear that he is plotting an executing a mass mail in voter fraud campaign.
  • FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 46,935
    So IOS 14 is getting widgets and picture in picture....those things Android has had for years.
  • glwglw Posts: 6,348
    edited June 22

    So IOS 14 is getting widgets and picture in picture....those things Android has had for years.

    And an app drawer, and you'll be able to set your default apps.
  • isamisam Posts: 32,714
    edited June 22
    Yep... and they've got a hell of a lot of people who aren't Marxists, including plenty who call themselves conservatives, singing their song for them. Imagine that; a politically radical, extreme left organisation has got every corporate in the world tripping over themselves to carry it's slogan; fiendishly brilliant
  • IshmaelZIshmaelZ Posts: 2,538
    glw said:

    So IOS 14 is getting widgets and picture in picture....those things Android has had for years.

    And an app drawer, and you'll be able to set your default apps.
    Bless. Almost like a real phone.
  • FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 46,935
    edited June 22
    glw said:

    So IOS 14 is getting widgets and picture in picture....those things Android has had for years.

    And an app drawer, and you'll be able to set your default apps.
    In all seriousness, the look of ios homescreen, with the blocky square icons etc, is starting to look really dated.

    With Nova Launcher on Android, you can make Android look like anything, but it looks modern with little work. I am surprised Apple haven't gone for circular flat style icons that everybody else has gone to.
  • AlistairAlistair Posts: 14,933
    isam said:

    Yep... and they've got a hell of a lot of people who aren't Marxists, including plenty who call themselves conservatives, singing their song for them. Imagine that; a politically radical, extreme left organisation has got every corporate in the world tripping over themselves to carry it's slogan; fiendishly brilliant
    Is it as good as a Revolutionary Communist Party member writing the Conservative manifesto at the last election?
  • MattWMattW Posts: 3,738
    edited June 22
    Alistair said:


    Is it as good as a Revolutionary Communist Party member writing the Conservative manifesto at the last election?

    I think a jab more recent than the 1990s might be useful :-D
  • Android is a horrible OS to develop for and I'm afraid the variety of hardware means the app quality is just objectively worse
  • Luckyguy1983Luckyguy1983 Posts: 11,579
    isam said:

    Yep... and they've got a hell of a lot of people who aren't Marxists, including plenty who call themselves conservatives, singing their song for them. Imagine that; a politically radical, extreme left organisation has got every corporate in the world tripping over themselves to carry it's slogan; fiendishly brilliant
    Like the EU, BLM is by its nature, something that if you're not a racist antediluvian bigot, you have to support, and show you support. It can then become anything, no matter how bad, that it likes.
  • NigelbNigelb Posts: 22,337
    True.
    Unlike the US, our police funding has not risen as crime has fallen.
  • isamisam Posts: 32,714
    Alistair said:

    isam said:

    Yep... and they've got a hell of a lot of people who aren't Marxists, including plenty who call themselves conservatives, singing their song for them. Imagine that; a politically radical, extreme left organisation has got every corporate in the world tripping over themselves to carry it's slogan; fiendishly brilliant
    Is it as good as a Revolutionary Communist Party member writing the Conservative manifesto at the last election?
    Infinitely better
  • JohnO said:

    JohnO said:

    If Robert Jenrick was a councillor he'd be facing some very serious consequences, and that's no euphemism.

    More like prosecution for misconduct in public office.
    Indeed. I know a few councillors of all stripes fuming at this, where they have recused themselves because they've been at the same event as a person making an application.

    I know there's a pandemic on but this is still a big issue, someone at Downing Street or CCHQ must know this is going to get very messy.
    Absolutely right and as soon as this broke, I was on here calling for his resignation. It’s a thundering disgrace Jenrick is still there.
    It’s a great article. His position is surely untenable now ?
  • FrankBoothFrankBooth Posts: 4,176

    FPT - this is a fascinating 40-minute interview. Yes, it's 8 months old, but it's no less fresh for that - the quality of the interviewer and interviewee is excellent. Well worth your time to watch in full:



    What's particularly interesting about it is that it featured on PoliticsJoe, which has a very left-ish tinge. However, Oli Dugmore, the interviewer, allows Douglas Murray to develop his arguments, listens to what he has to say, gently challenges him on some of it, and reflects on and considers some of his points - you can see him doing it.

    It's very good. No interruptions. No point scoring. It's a sad reminder of how good political interviews used to be.

    I think Douglas Murray got fairer treatment here than he would have done on Newsnight or Channel 4 news.

    Full respect to Oli Dugmore.

    There is a growing niche on the YouTube for these type of interviews. Unfortunately, on the MSM, it is all about the gotchas these days.
    I've not watched the interview and don't know the channel, but i agree with the sentiments. It's an odd thing that Britain is, I think the only country in Europe where all the maintstream print media is strongly biased - I'm familiar with the press in eight countries and although they all have Sun-like gotcha papers, the broadsheets make a serious effort to appear balanced and give everyone a hearing.

    TV takes its style from this, I think, and the belief that you gain audience by being combative and making every interview into a battle. And perhaps it's true - it's hard to explain the popularity of the Paxman genre otherwise. But it doesn't appeal to me - like Casino I'd rather the interviewer explored the opinions of the subject, including politely asking difficult questions, and let the viewers - generally consenting adults - make their own minds up.
    I tend to think the influence is more US TV news. The presenters have turned themselves into the story. I suspect many of them are terrified of seeming 'soft', of letting the politicians get away with it etc. IMO you can be forensic and probing without all the theatrics.

    I do think you are slightly naive about politics though. We all know that politicians are often sent out with a brief to deflect from the core issue, shift the focus onto something else, not answer the question (perhaps with good reason!). Of course the viewer is going to be irritated by that and interviewers seem to think they are the peoples' representative. On balance I'd still see it as preferable to a supine approach which you often see elsewhere in the world - for obvious reasons.
  • CatManCatMan Posts: 942

    Android is a horrible OS to develop for and I'm afraid the variety of hardware means the app quality is just objectively worse

  • TheScreamingEaglesTheScreamingEagles Posts: 82,437
    Newark really has been unlucky with their recent MPs hasn't it?

    There was the tragic Fiona Jones, that prize bellend Patrick Mercer, and now the shameless Robert Jenrick.
  • Richard_TyndallRichard_Tyndall Posts: 21,517

    Just received an email from my dentist (private) saying £7 surcharge for a check up, £35 surcharge for aerosol generating work to cover PPE cost. That is seriously steep charges, I imagine a lot of people won't be able to afford that.

    Is that through Denplan ?
    No, just a private dental practice making their patients aware of the additional charges. It isn't a particularly fancy place.
    Thanks.

    My wife and I have been in Denplan for years and they are very good

    They paid for a repair to a filling in New Zealand, an emergency repair for my wife in Uxbridge just before we flew to Canada, and repair to my crown which fell out on my way to Heathrow 2 years ago

    As well as most general treatment
    I was with Denplan but then got moved without my permission to BUPA - I assume because the practice I am registered with changed cover provider.

    BUPA have said they will not cover the cost of the PPE and like others on here I have been told I must stump up £7 a visit for the PPE costs.

    My sister went last week to the same dentist and was really annoyed to find out that the PPE consisted of a squeeze of hand sanitiser and one of those paper masks you can buy for pennies.
  • TheScreamingEaglesTheScreamingEagles Posts: 82,437

    JohnO said:

    JohnO said:

    If Robert Jenrick was a councillor he'd be facing some very serious consequences, and that's no euphemism.

    More like prosecution for misconduct in public office.
    Indeed. I know a few councillors of all stripes fuming at this, where they have recused themselves because they've been at the same event as a person making an application.

    I know there's a pandemic on but this is still a big issue, someone at Downing Street or CCHQ must know this is going to get very messy.
    Absolutely right and as soon as this broke, I was on here calling for his resignation. It’s a thundering disgrace Jenrick is still there.
    It’s a great article. His position is surely untenable now ?
    His position has been untenable the moment this story broke.

    It is shameful how shameless Jenrick and Boris Johnson really are.
  • TheScreamingEaglesTheScreamingEagles Posts: 82,437
    JohnO said:

    JohnO said:

    If Robert Jenrick was a councillor he'd be facing some very serious consequences, and that's no euphemism.

    More like prosecution for misconduct in public office.
    Indeed. I know a few councillors of all stripes fuming at this, where they have recused themselves because they've been at the same event as a person making an application.

    I know there's a pandemic on but this is still a big issue, someone at Downing Street or CCHQ must know this is going to get very messy.
    Absolutely right and as soon as this broke, I was on here calling for his resignation. It’s a thundering disgrace Jenrick is still there.
    That's because you're a man of honour and integrity.
  • CyclefreeCyclefree Posts: 17,766

    JohnO said:

    JohnO said:

    If Robert Jenrick was a councillor he'd be facing some very serious consequences, and that's no euphemism.

    More like prosecution for misconduct in public office.
    Indeed. I know a few councillors of all stripes fuming at this, where they have recused themselves because they've been at the same event as a person making an application.

    I know there's a pandemic on but this is still a big issue, someone at Downing Street or CCHQ must know this is going to get very messy.
    Absolutely right and as soon as this broke, I was on here calling for his resignation. It’s a thundering disgrace Jenrick is still there.
    It’s a great article. His position is surely untenable now ?
    Steve Reed is the Shadow Minister. I know nothing about him. Is he any good?

    If he starts ranting about corruption he will miss the mark. He needs to ask - repeatedly - why Jenrick did not recuse himself after that dinner and when he told his officials the full story of what happened there.

    It would also help if he had some inside knowledge of how tables at fund-raising dinners are organised and whether the Minister knows in advance e where he will be sitting. Because that part of the story does not smell right to me either. But what do I know? Perhaps it is lucky dip.
  • Richard_TyndallRichard_Tyndall Posts: 21,517

    JohnO said:

    JohnO said:

    If Robert Jenrick was a councillor he'd be facing some very serious consequences, and that's no euphemism.

    More like prosecution for misconduct in public office.
    Indeed. I know a few councillors of all stripes fuming at this, where they have recused themselves because they've been at the same event as a person making an application.

    I know there's a pandemic on but this is still a big issue, someone at Downing Street or CCHQ must know this is going to get very messy.
    Absolutely right and as soon as this broke, I was on here calling for his resignation. It’s a thundering disgrace Jenrick is still there.
    It’s a great article. His position is surely untenable now ?
    It has been for weeks but that doesn't seem to make much difference.

    MP for Newark, a constituency which has fared badly for MPs over the last couple of decades. The awful Fiona Jones who got off a charge of electoral fraud by claiming the rules were too difficult to understand, the equally awful Patrick Mercer who tried to sell Parliamentary questions and now Jenrick.

    A shame that on paper it is one of the safest seats in the country.
  • glwglw Posts: 6,348
    Scott_xP said:
    Dig out an old Windows Phone device — preferably WP8 GDR3 as it was really polished by then and ran on much better hardware than the WP7 devices — and it is striking how modern and slick it feels. Design wise nothing else was ever as cohesive — maybe too much so as it made app branding very difficult — every app looks native, works essentially the same way, animates very smoothly, adapts for different screens, is multi-modal, had dark/light modes, has a well though out lifecycle, and was very stable.

    It's a damn shame that Microsoft threw in the towel.
  • TheScreamingEaglesTheScreamingEagles Posts: 82,437
    Cyclefree said:

    JohnO said:

    JohnO said:

    If Robert Jenrick was a councillor he'd be facing some very serious consequences, and that's no euphemism.

    More like prosecution for misconduct in public office.
    Indeed. I know a few councillors of all stripes fuming at this, where they have recused themselves because they've been at the same event as a person making an application.

    I know there's a pandemic on but this is still a big issue, someone at Downing Street or CCHQ must know this is going to get very messy.
    Absolutely right and as soon as this broke, I was on here calling for his resignation. It’s a thundering disgrace Jenrick is still there.
    It’s a great article. His position is surely untenable now ?
    Steve Reed is the Shadow Minister. I know nothing about him. Is he any good?

    If he starts ranting about corruption he will miss the mark. He needs to ask - repeatedly - why Jenrick did not recuse himself after that dinner and when he told his officials the full story of what happened there.

    It would also help if he had some inside knowledge of how tables at fund-raising dinners are organised and whether the Minister knows in advance e where he will be sitting. Because that part of the story does not smell right to me either. But what do I know? Perhaps it is lucky dip.
    Steve Reed has fantastic judgment, he follows me on Twitter for starters.
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