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politicalbetting.com » Blog Archive » First YouGov polling response to the lockdown changes looks po

SystemSystem Posts: 8,258
edited June 23 in General

imagepoliticalbetting.com » Blog Archive » First YouGov polling response to the lockdown changes looks positive for the ministers

First polling response to the lockdown changes look positive pic.twitter.com/b6my26yx9C

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Comments

  • rottenboroughrottenborough Posts: 33,796
    First. Like Biden (at the moment).
  • Ave_itAve_it Posts: 2,215
    Second like Trump (or will he end up first?) :lol:
  • dixiedeandixiedean Posts: 7,128
    Ave_it said:

    Second like Trump (or will he end up first?) :lol:

    You're first in the Electoral College!
  • Ave_itAve_it Posts: 2,215
    Looking forward to USA election on here, 3 Nov 2020!

    Will it be postal only? (The election that is?)
  • AnabobazinaAnabobazina Posts: 3,643
    Ave_it said:

    Second like Trump (or will he end up first?) :lol:

    I keep meaning to ask you, do you want Trump to win? I recall you supported him in 2018.
  • Andy_JSAndy_JS Posts: 6,036
    edited June 23
    Ave_it said:

    Looking forward to USA election on here, 3 Nov 2020!

    Will it be postal only? (The election that is?)

    It could be difficult to vote in certain parts of Seattle, even with postals.
  • rottenboroughrottenborough Posts: 33,796
    Medical lass from UCL sounding very sceptical on this amount of opening up. (BBC 2)
  • isamisam Posts: 32,714
    I like going to the pub once a week, but can't say I am tripping over myself to get there on July 4th if I have to book, socially distance, give my deets, watch my step and what have you.. part of going to the pub is getting away from all that
  • FlatlanderFlatlander Posts: 181
    edited June 23
    Interesting snippet:

    My brother-in-law had a mysterious flu like illness in December which refused to go away quickly, and my nephew also caught it. My nephew had chilblains on his toes, which is somewhat unusual.

    He caught this illness from a friend who is a care worker. Some of his 'clients' at the time did not fare well _at all_.

    This friend has just tested antibody positive.

    There's always a possibility that this friend had it asymptomatically (or a very mild case) since, but...hmm...

    I'm not sure how you can get tested in this situation? Presumably the antibody tests are still restricted.
  • NigelbNigelb Posts: 22,333
    Did Pence realise his mistake and cover it at the last moment ?

  • Ave_itAve_it Posts: 2,215

    Ave_it said:

    Second like Trump (or will he end up first?) :lol:

    I keep meaning to ask you, do you want Trump to win? I recall you supported him in 2018.
    To be honest I am not keen on Trump but I think Biden is past it and not up to the job. It will be a lot of fun seeing the woke whinging on here if Trump wins!
  • rottenboroughrottenborough Posts: 33,796
    isam said:

    I like going to the pub once a week, but can't say I am tripping over myself to get there on July 4th if I have to book, socially distance, give my deets, watch my step and what have you.. part of going to the pub is getting away from all that

    I suspect that first weekend will be chaotic and a bit mental to be frank. If a warm one we are looking at major queues.

    I shall hang fire.

    Indeed, one of my closest locals has decided to not open until the Monday, precisely to avoid that manic weekend.
  • Andy_JSAndy_JS Posts: 6,036
    isam said:

    I like going to the pub once a week, but can't say I am tripping over myself to get there on July 4th if I have to book, socially distance, give my deets, watch my step and what have you.. part of going to the pub is getting away from all that

    I hardly ever plan to go to a pub or cafe. I just walk in when I feel like it. Having to plan the whole thing in advance won't be popular with many people.
  • The Government will probably be happy with that.

    And there's a reasonable case that working testing and the residual measures will stop a spike, and that the economic and political will for further significant lockdown have evaporated. If the UK can manage to keep the death rate at about 100 a day, that's 35 000 a year, and the comparison with a moderately bad flu year is sad but valid.

    (Worth noting in passing that 1 m spacing won't solve the school problem entirely though)

    However, the UK is unlocking at a significantly higher death rate than our European neighbours (France seem to have plateaued about 30 deaths a day, Germany about a dozen).

    Hopefully, we'll get away with it, and I'm sanguine rather than pessimistic. But it's not impressive that the UK has got cornered like this.
  • AnabobazinaAnabobazina Posts: 3,643
    edited June 23
    isam said:

    I like going to the pub once a week, but can't say I am tripping over myself to get there on July 4th if I have to book, socially distance, give my deets, watch my step and what have you.. part of going to the pub is getting away from all that

    Just having a few pints in the (I hope) sunshine after or during a walk or bike ride will be infinitely better than the current situation. Saturdays have basically been ruined by the pub closedown. I don’t mind leaving a few details with the barmaid if it means I can whet my thirst.
  • isamisam Posts: 32,714

    isam said:

    I like going to the pub once a week, but can't say I am tripping over myself to get there on July 4th if I have to book, socially distance, give my deets, watch my step and what have you.. part of going to the pub is getting away from all that

    I suspect that first weekend will be chaotic and a bit mental to be frank. If a warm one we are looking at major queues.

    I shall hang fire.

    Indeed, one of my closest locals has decided to not open until the Monday, precisely to avoid that manic weekend.
    I think I will make my return with the missus and baby on a weekday afternoon and leave the lads to their Saturday night out
  • MarqueeMarkMarqueeMark Posts: 34,548

    Interesting snippet:

    My brother-in-law had a mysterious flu like illness in December which refused to go away quickly, and my nephew also caught it. My nephew had chilblains on his toes, which is somewhat unusual.

    He caught this illness from a friend who is a care worker. Some of his 'clients' at the time did not fare well _at all_.

    This friend has just tested antibody positive.

    There's always a possibility that this friend had it asymptomatically (or a very mild case) since, but...hmm...

    I'm not sure how you can get tested in this situation? Presumably the antibody tests are still restricted.

    Many of us did. Not flu, but really horrible. Early December. Caught it from a friend who had been in northern Italy.

    "If it ain't Covid-19, it'll do 'til Covid-19 get's here....."

  • AnabobazinaAnabobazina Posts: 3,643
    edited June 23
    Ave_it said:

    Ave_it said:

    Second like Trump (or will he end up first?) :lol:

    I keep meaning to ask you, do you want Trump to win? I recall you supported him in 2018.
    To be honest I am not keen on Trump but I think Biden is past it and not up to the job. It will be a lot of fun seeing the woke whinging on here if Trump wins!
    I’ll put you on the Trumpton Butt list!

    Lots of them on PB 😉
  • Beibheirli_CBeibheirli_C Posts: 3,286
    Nigelb said:

    Did Pence realise his mistake and cover it at the last moment ?

    twitter.com/twmentality1/status/1275485268322267138

    Surely even Pence is not that consummate an ass-kisser?
  • To be honest I think even I would have chosen somewhat support.
  • MortimerMortimer Posts: 11,919
    edited June 23

    Interesting snippet:

    My brother-in-law had a mysterious flu like illness in December which refused to go away quickly, and my nephew also caught it. My nephew had chilblains on his toes, which is somewhat unusual.

    He caught this illness from a friend who is a care worker. Some of his 'clients' at the time did not fare well _at all_.

    This friend has just tested antibody positive.

    There's always a possibility that this friend had it asymptomatically (or a very mild case) since, but...hmm...

    I'm not sure how you can get tested in this situation? Presumably the antibody tests are still restricted.

    Many of us did. Not flu, but really horrible. Early December. Caught it from a friend who had been in northern Italy.

    "If it ain't Covid-19, it'll do 'til Covid-19 get's here....."

    Christmas day till 30th December I was floored with a horrible cough, fever (which I've only had twice in adulthood, the other time was 6 weeks before). Didn't realise that my taste had pretty much gone until about 9th Jan, when I had a chicken kiev and it was a taste explosion compared to previous weeks.

    Just spoke to a mate who I sat next to at a Christmas dinner. Turned out he had the same around 21st-27th.

    Reckons he picked it up from his mate a few days earlier. Who had just returned from a business trip to....

    Wuhan!
  • AnabobazinaAnabobazina Posts: 3,643
    Andy_JS said:

    isam said:

    I like going to the pub once a week, but can't say I am tripping over myself to get there on July 4th if I have to book, socially distance, give my deets, watch my step and what have you.. part of going to the pub is getting away from all that

    I hardly ever plan to go to a pub or cafe. I just walk in when I feel like it. Having to plan the whole thing in advance won't be popular with many people.
    Why would you have to plan the whole thing in advance?
  • Andy_JSAndy_JS Posts: 6,036

    Interesting snippet:

    My brother-in-law had a mysterious flu like illness in December which refused to go away quickly, and my nephew also caught it. My nephew had chilblains on his toes, which is somewhat unusual.

    He caught this illness from a friend who is a care worker. Some of his 'clients' at the time did not fare well _at all_.

    This friend has just tested antibody positive.

    There's always a possibility that this friend had it asymptomatically (or a very mild case) since, but...hmm...

    I'm not sure how you can get tested in this situation? Presumably the antibody tests are still restricted.

    Many of us did. Not flu, but really horrible. Early December. Caught it from a friend who had been in northern Italy.

    "If it ain't Covid-19, it'll do 'til Covid-19 get's here....."

    Yes, early December. Lots of people had something much worse than usual around that time.
  • another_richardanother_richard Posts: 17,386
    edited June 23
    Mortimer said:

    Interesting snippet:

    My brother-in-law had a mysterious flu like illness in December which refused to go away quickly, and my nephew also caught it. My nephew had chilblains on his toes, which is somewhat unusual.

    He caught this illness from a friend who is a care worker. Some of his 'clients' at the time did not fare well _at all_.

    This friend has just tested antibody positive.

    There's always a possibility that this friend had it asymptomatically (or a very mild case) since, but...hmm...

    I'm not sure how you can get tested in this situation? Presumably the antibody tests are still restricted.

    Many of us did. Not flu, but really horrible. Early December. Caught it from a friend who had been in northern Italy.

    "If it ain't Covid-19, it'll do 'til Covid-19 get's here....."

    Christmas day till 30th December I was floored with a horrible cough, fever (which I've only had twice in adulthood, the other time was 6 weeks before). Didn't realise that my taste had pretty much gone until about 9th Jan, when I had a chicken kiev and it was a taste explosion compared to previous weeks.

    Just spoke to a mate who I sat next to at a Christmas dinner. Turned out he had the same around 21st-27th.

    Reckons he picked it up from his mate a few days earlier. Who had just returned from a business trip to....

    Wuhan!
    Did anyone who had a mystery 'flu' get covid later on ?

    Did anyone in close contact with someone who had a mystery 'flu' get covid later on ?

    Did anyone who possibly got covid from March onwards get a mystery 'flu' previously ?

    Did anyone in close contact with someone who possibly got covid get a mystery 'flu' previously ?
  • AnabobazinaAnabobazina Posts: 3,643
    Mortimer said:

    Interesting snippet:

    My brother-in-law had a mysterious flu like illness in December which refused to go away quickly, and my nephew also caught it. My nephew had chilblains on his toes, which is somewhat unusual.

    He caught this illness from a friend who is a care worker. Some of his 'clients' at the time did not fare well _at all_.

    This friend has just tested antibody positive.

    There's always a possibility that this friend had it asymptomatically (or a very mild case) since, but...hmm...

    I'm not sure how you can get tested in this situation? Presumably the antibody tests are still restricted.

    Many of us did. Not flu, but really horrible. Early December. Caught it from a friend who had been in northern Italy.

    "If it ain't Covid-19, it'll do 'til Covid-19 get's here....."

    Christmas day till 30th December I was floored with a horrible cough, fever (which I've only had twice in adulthood, the other time was 6 weeks before). Didn't realise that my taste had pretty much gone until about 9th Jan, when I had a chicken kiev and it was a taste explosion compared to previous weeks.

    Just spoke to a mate who I sat next to at a Christmas dinner. Turned out he had the same around 21st-27th.

    Reckons he picked it up from his mate a few days earlier. Who had just returned from a business trip to....

    Wuhan!
    Yuk. Sounds very likely that you had it!

    I’m of the view that the England Test team all has it when struck down by ‘flu’ on the Saffer tour.
  • Beibheirli_CBeibheirli_C Posts: 3,286
    It is interesting to see the anecdotes of those PBers who think they have had Covid or know people who have.

    If it turns out that the virus has gone through a large segment of the population asymptomatically then there will be hell to pay (politically) for stopping tests across the population to determine the overall infection rate. The UK only tested people in hospitals.

    Was the lockdown necessary? What would be the political price if people think the lockdown was a mistake?
  • Beibheirli_CBeibheirli_C Posts: 3,286
    Andy_JS said:

    Interesting snippet:

    My brother-in-law had a mysterious flu like illness in December which refused to go away quickly, and my nephew also caught it. My nephew had chilblains on his toes, which is somewhat unusual.

    He caught this illness from a friend who is a care worker. Some of his 'clients' at the time did not fare well _at all_.

    This friend has just tested antibody positive.

    There's always a possibility that this friend had it asymptomatically (or a very mild case) since, but...hmm...

    I'm not sure how you can get tested in this situation? Presumably the antibody tests are still restricted.

    Many of us did. Not flu, but really horrible. Early December. Caught it from a friend who had been in northern Italy.

    "If it ain't Covid-19, it'll do 'til Covid-19 get's here....."

    Yes, early December. Lots of people had something much worse than usual around that time.
    I remember @Cyclefree posting about having something awful and going to see her GP. I wonder how many people the GP passed it to?
  • RobDRobD Posts: 47,165

    It is interesting to see the anecdotes of those PBers who think they have had Covid or know people who have.

    If it turns out that the virus has gone through a large segment of the population asymptomatically then there will be hell to pay (politically) for stopping tests across the population to determine the overall infection rate. The UK only tested people in hospitals.

    Was the lockdown necessary? What would be the political price if people think the lockdown was a mistake?

    The antibody surveys suggest nothing of the sort though.
  • MortimerMortimer Posts: 11,919

    It is interesting to see the anecdotes of those PBers who think they have had Covid or know people who have.

    If it turns out that the virus has gone through a large segment of the population asymptomatically then there will be hell to pay (politically) for stopping tests across the population to determine the overall infection rate. The UK only tested people in hospitals.

    Was the lockdown necessary? What would be the political price if people think the lockdown was a mistake?

    I travel a lot, and come into close contact with people who travel a whole lot more. One mate was chucked off the Oxford trial early on, when they found he already had antibodies (he reckons picked up in Beijing, late December). I suspect given the frequency of discussions of airmiles and lounges, that the average PBer travels a whole lot more than the average Brit.

    Given how close some parts of the UK came to having healthcare overwhelmed, and how parts of Italy and the US saw exactly that, I'm not sure any 'lockdown was unnecessary' theory will work.
  • FlatlanderFlatlander Posts: 181
    edited June 23
    Andy_JS said:

    Interesting snippet:

    My brother-in-law had a mysterious flu like illness in December which refused to go away quickly, and my nephew also caught it. My nephew had chilblains on his toes, which is somewhat unusual.

    He caught this illness from a friend who is a care worker. Some of his 'clients' at the time did not fare well _at all_.

    This friend has just tested antibody positive.

    There's always a possibility that this friend had it asymptomatically (or a very mild case) since, but...hmm...

    I'm not sure how you can get tested in this situation? Presumably the antibody tests are still restricted.

    Many of us did. Not flu, but really horrible. Early December. Caught it from a friend who had been in northern Italy.

    "If it ain't Covid-19, it'll do 'til Covid-19 get's here....."

    Yes, early December. Lots of people had something much worse than usual around that time.
    I wonder if this mysterious December edition was the original strain. This doesn't seem to have had the explosive growth of the later strain imported from Europe.

    Is this the real reason SK and Japan did better? And to some extent Germany (who got started early, and used the slower growth to work out how to deal with it better).

    I'd like to see more test results before jumping to conclusions though...

  • Beibheirli_CBeibheirli_C Posts: 3,286
    Mortimer said:

    It is interesting to see the anecdotes of those PBers who think they have had Covid or know people who have.

    If it turns out that the virus has gone through a large segment of the population asymptomatically then there will be hell to pay (politically) for stopping tests across the population to determine the overall infection rate. The UK only tested people in hospitals.

    Was the lockdown necessary? What would be the political price if people think the lockdown was a mistake?

    I travel a lot, and come into close contact with people who travel a whole lot more. One mate was chucked off the Oxford trial early on, when they found he already had antibodies (he reckons picked up in Beijing, late December). I suspect given the frequency of discussions of airmiles and lounges, that the average PBer travels a whole lot more than the average Brit.

    Given how close some parts of the UK came to having healthcare overwhelmed, and how parts of Italy and the US saw exactly that, I'm not sure any 'lockdown was unnecessary' theory will work.
    I am not advocating a position, merely wondering what the fallout would be if the public got the idea that the lockdown was overdone / unnecessary?

    The counter-argument is an apparent lack of excess deaths in the national stats. If COvid was spreading then surely the mortuary alarm bells would have gone off, so to speak...
  • isamisam Posts: 32,714
    edited June 23

    It is interesting to see the anecdotes of those PBers who think they have had Covid or know people who have.

    If it turns out that the virus has gone through a large segment of the population asymptomatically then there will be hell to pay (politically) for stopping tests across the population to determine the overall infection rate. The UK only tested people in hospitals.

    Was the lockdown necessary? What would be the political price if people think the lockdown was a mistake?

    I have asked this question from the very start. Boris was the least enthusiastic politician in terms of lockdown, so I guess, if they're being consistent, those who said he was too late to enforce it will be begging forgiveness for all the bad things they've said and posted other people saying about him, and admit he was instinctively right all along?
  • FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 46,935
    The noose found in Nascar driver Bubba Wallace's garage on Sunday was actually a handle on a garage door and had been there since last year, an FBI investigation concluded.

    https://www.bbc.com/sport/motorsport/53159686
  • MortimerMortimer Posts: 11,919

    Mortimer said:

    It is interesting to see the anecdotes of those PBers who think they have had Covid or know people who have.

    If it turns out that the virus has gone through a large segment of the population asymptomatically then there will be hell to pay (politically) for stopping tests across the population to determine the overall infection rate. The UK only tested people in hospitals.

    Was the lockdown necessary? What would be the political price if people think the lockdown was a mistake?

    I travel a lot, and come into close contact with people who travel a whole lot more. One mate was chucked off the Oxford trial early on, when they found he already had antibodies (he reckons picked up in Beijing, late December). I suspect given the frequency of discussions of airmiles and lounges, that the average PBer travels a whole lot more than the average Brit.

    Given how close some parts of the UK came to having healthcare overwhelmed, and how parts of Italy and the US saw exactly that, I'm not sure any 'lockdown was unnecessary' theory will work.
    I am not advocating a position, merely wondering what the fallout would be if the public got the idea that the lockdown was overdone / unnecessary?

    The counter-argument is an apparent lack of excess deaths in the national stats. If COvid was spreading then surely the mortuary alarm bells would have gone off, so to speak...
    My symptoms, bad as they felt at the time, were clearly on the very mild end of Covid - if thats what it was.

    Perhaps a weaker strain? Or just happened to be unlucky to get another coronavirus....
  • MortimerMortimer Posts: 11,919

    The noose found in Nascar driver Bubba Wallace's garage on Sunday was actually a handle on a garage door and had been there since last year, an FBI investigation concluded.

    https://www.bbc.com/sport/motorsport/53159686

    Ermmmm....whaaaat?
  • AnabobazinaAnabobazina Posts: 3,643
    isam said:

    It is interesting to see the anecdotes of those PBers who think they have had Covid or know people who have.

    If it turns out that the virus has gone through a large segment of the population asymptomatically then there will be hell to pay (politically) for stopping tests across the population to determine the overall infection rate. The UK only tested people in hospitals.

    Was the lockdown necessary? What would be the political price if people think the lockdown was a mistake?

    I have asked this question from the very start. Boris was the least enthusiastic politician in terms of lockdown, so I guess, is they're being consistent, those who said he was too late to enforce it will be begging forgiveness for all the bad things they've said and posted other people saying about him and saying he was instinctively right all along?
    I dunno how commonplace my position is but I am on record on here at the time saying we locked down too early and (thus) unlocked too late.

    I think the short sharp shock is best - and Bozza faffed around with Happy Birthday handwashing for a fortnight when all the international evidence showed locking down early was the way to go.
  • FlatlanderFlatlander Posts: 181
    edited June 23

    Mortimer said:

    It is interesting to see the anecdotes of those PBers who think they have had Covid or know people who have.

    If it turns out that the virus has gone through a large segment of the population asymptomatically then there will be hell to pay (politically) for stopping tests across the population to determine the overall infection rate. The UK only tested people in hospitals.

    Was the lockdown necessary? What would be the political price if people think the lockdown was a mistake?

    I travel a lot, and come into close contact with people who travel a whole lot more. One mate was chucked off the Oxford trial early on, when they found he already had antibodies (he reckons picked up in Beijing, late December). I suspect given the frequency of discussions of airmiles and lounges, that the average PBer travels a whole lot more than the average Brit.

    Given how close some parts of the UK came to having healthcare overwhelmed, and how parts of Italy and the US saw exactly that, I'm not sure any 'lockdown was unnecessary' theory will work.
    I am not advocating a position, merely wondering what the fallout would be if the public got the idea that the lockdown was overdone / unnecessary?

    The counter-argument is an apparent lack of excess deaths in the national stats. If COvid was spreading then surely the mortuary alarm bells would have gone off, so to speak...
    Not if the original strain wasn't quite as bad, and didn't spread as fast. As I implied, some elderly people did die from whatever this thing was in December.

    There were population tests from the very beginning though, and they showed nothing. And the current antibody tests are also not showing vast numbers of people having had it.

    It is just a bit weird, that's all. Like everything connected to this virus.
  • Beibheirli_CBeibheirli_C Posts: 3,286
    isam said:

    It is interesting to see the anecdotes of those PBers who think they have had Covid or know people who have.

    If it turns out that the virus has gone through a large segment of the population asymptomatically then there will be hell to pay (politically) for stopping tests across the population to determine the overall infection rate. The UK only tested people in hospitals.

    Was the lockdown necessary? What would be the political price if people think the lockdown was a mistake?

    I have asked this question from the very start. Boris was the least enthusiastic politician in terms of lockdown, so I guess, if they're being consistent, those who said he was too late to enforce it will be begging forgiveness for all the bad things they've said and posted other people saying about him, and admit he was instinctively right all along?
    It is difficult to say. There has been a lot of back-and-forward and changing positions and contradictory guidance. Boris may have been reluctant to start the lockdown but I am not sure that would save him.
  • Beibheirli_CBeibheirli_C Posts: 3,286
    LadyG said:



    Yes. A complete hoax

    twitter.com/MarkDice/status/1275307374547308544?s=20

    Welcome aboard :+1:
  • Andy_JSAndy_JS Posts: 6,036
    edited June 23
    edit
  • isamisam Posts: 32,714

    isam said:

    It is interesting to see the anecdotes of those PBers who think they have had Covid or know people who have.

    If it turns out that the virus has gone through a large segment of the population asymptomatically then there will be hell to pay (politically) for stopping tests across the population to determine the overall infection rate. The UK only tested people in hospitals.

    Was the lockdown necessary? What would be the political price if people think the lockdown was a mistake?

    I have asked this question from the very start. Boris was the least enthusiastic politician in terms of lockdown, so I guess, if they're being consistent, those who said he was too late to enforce it will be begging forgiveness for all the bad things they've said and posted other people saying about him, and admit he was instinctively right all along?
    It is difficult to say. There has been a lot of back-and-forward and changing positions and contradictory guidance. Boris may have been reluctant to start the lockdown but I am not sure that would save him.
    I doubt it would. People won't remember that they demanded a stricter lockdown when they come to blame him for having a lockdown at all, just as it won't stop them blaming him for the economy being in ruins because of the lockdown they demanded
  • Beibheirli_CBeibheirli_C Posts: 3,286
    Goodnight everyone.
  • HYUFDHYUFD Posts: 73,082
    So a plurality of the country back easing the lockdown further and a majority of Tory and Leave voters but a plurality of Labour, LD and Remain voters think the changes go too far. No surprise there
  • isamisam Posts: 32,714
    "I'll tell you what happens with impossible promises. You start with far-fetched resolutions; they are then pickled into a rigid dogma, a code, and you go through the years sticking to that, out-placed, outdated, irrelevant to the real needs, and you end in the grotesque chaos of a white student, a white student, scuttling round the city handing out lectures to black policemen."

  • LostPasswordLostPassword Posts: 1,148
    isam said:

    It is interesting to see the anecdotes of those PBers who think they have had Covid or know people who have.

    If it turns out that the virus has gone through a large segment of the population asymptomatically then there will be hell to pay (politically) for stopping tests across the population to determine the overall infection rate. The UK only tested people in hospitals.

    Was the lockdown necessary? What would be the political price if people think the lockdown was a mistake?

    I have asked this question from the very start. Boris was the least enthusiastic politician in terms of lockdown, so I guess, if they're being consistent, those who said he was too late to enforce it will be begging forgiveness for all the bad things they've said and posted other people saying about him, and admit he was instinctively right all along?
    You can only make your judgement on the basis of the evidence you have at the time. I think that, on the basis of what we could see was happening at the time in Italy, we should have gone into lockdown earlier - but, sure, it might turn out - after the event - that would have been the wrong decision, But I don't think anyone deserves any credit for accidentally coming to that conclusion for the wrong reasons.
  • LostPasswordLostPassword Posts: 1,148
    Is everyone suitably excited about Texas being close?

    Once again I notice a poll showing Trump outperforming Republicans (Public Policy Polling Jun 19-20 has Biden +9, but Dems +11 in the generic ballot). He's clearly not the toxic drag on the ticket I would like to think he was. Trump is still in this.
  • alteregoalterego Posts: 1,029

    isam said:

    It is interesting to see the anecdotes of those PBers who think they have had Covid or know people who have.

    If it turns out that the virus has gone through a large segment of the population asymptomatically then there will be hell to pay (politically) for stopping tests across the population to determine the overall infection rate. The UK only tested people in hospitals.

    Was the lockdown necessary? What would be the political price if people think the lockdown was a mistake?

    I have asked this question from the very start. Boris was the least enthusiastic politician in terms of lockdown, so I guess, if they're being consistent, those who said he was too late to enforce it will be begging forgiveness for all the bad things they've said and posted other people saying about him, and admit he was instinctively right all along?
    You can only make your judgement on the basis of the evidence you have at the time. I think that, on the basis of what we could see was happening at the time in Italy, we should have gone into lockdown earlier - but, sure, it might turn out - after the event - that would have been the wrong decision, But I don't think anyone deserves any credit for accidentally coming to that conclusion for the wrong reasons.
    What a mealy mouthed post
  • alteregoalterego Posts: 1,029
    isam said:

    "I'll tell you what happens with impossible promises. You start with far-fetched resolutions; they are then pickled into a rigid dogma, a code, and you go through the years sticking to that, out-placed, outdated, irrelevant to the real needs, and you end in the grotesque chaos of a white student, a white student, scuttling round the city handing out lectures to black policemen."

    nice face covering
  • SurreySurrey Posts: 190
    US Republican candidate as result of convention, last matched prices:
    Trump 1.07
    Pence 29
    Haley 40
    Romney 200
    Ryan 480
  • alteregoalterego Posts: 1,029

    isam said:

    It is interesting to see the anecdotes of those PBers who think they have had Covid or know people who have.

    If it turns out that the virus has gone through a large segment of the population asymptomatically then there will be hell to pay (politically) for stopping tests across the population to determine the overall infection rate. The UK only tested people in hospitals.

    Was the lockdown necessary? What would be the political price if people think the lockdown was a mistake?

    I have asked this question from the very start. Boris was the least enthusiastic politician in terms of lockdown, so I guess, is they're being consistent, those who said he was too late to enforce it will be begging forgiveness for all the bad things they've said and posted other people saying about him and saying he was instinctively right all along?
    I dunno how commonplace my position is but I am on record on here at the time saying we locked down too early and (thus) unlocked too late.

    I think the short sharp shock is best - and Bozza faffed around with Happy Birthday handwashing for a fortnight when all the international evidence showed locking down early was the way to go.
    Aren't you just fucking fantastic
  • SurreySurrey Posts: 190

    Ave_it said:

    Ave_it said:

    Second like Trump (or will he end up first?) :lol:

    I keep meaning to ask you, do you want Trump to win? I recall you supported him in 2018.
    To be honest I am not keen on Trump but I think Biden is past it and not up to the job. It will be a lot of fun seeing the woke whinging on here if Trump wins!
    I’ll put you on the Trumpton Butt list!

    Lots of them on PB 😉
    Indeed. Is it me or are they swarming like midges at the moment?
  • HYUFDHYUFD Posts: 73,082

    Is everyone suitably excited about Texas being close?

    Once again I notice a poll showing Trump outperforming Republicans (Public Policy Polling Jun 19-20 has Biden +9, but Dems +11 in the generic ballot). He's clearly not the toxic drag on the ticket I would like to think he was. Trump is still in this.

    There was a Democracy Institute poll on June 7th with Trump ahead of Biden 48% to 47% and in the Electoral College by 293 to 245 votes, with Biden winning Michigan and Wisconsin but Trump picking up New Hampshire and Minnesota since 2016.

    https://www.express.co.uk/news/politics/1292288/US-election-2020-donald-trump-poll-results-democracy-institute-of-america
  • alteregoalterego Posts: 1,029
    Surrey said:

    Ave_it said:

    Ave_it said:

    Second like Trump (or will he end up first?) :lol:

    I keep meaning to ask you, do you want Trump to win? I recall you supported him in 2018.
    To be honest I am not keen on Trump but I think Biden is past it and not up to the job. It will be a lot of fun seeing the woke whinging on here if Trump wins!
    I’ll put you on the Trumpton Butt list!

    Lots of them on PB 😉
    Indeed. Is it me or are they swarming like midges at the moment?
    Swarming midges, you must be Scottish, not that that disqualifies you on here nor should it
  • alteregoalterego Posts: 1,029
  • SurreySurrey Posts: 190
    alterego said:

    Surrey said:

    Ave_it said:

    Ave_it said:

    Second like Trump (or will he end up first?) :lol:

    I keep meaning to ask you, do you want Trump to win? I recall you supported him in 2018.
    To be honest I am not keen on Trump but I think Biden is past it and not up to the job. It will be a lot of fun seeing the woke whinging on here if Trump wins!
    I’ll put you on the Trumpton Butt list!

    Lots of them on PB 😉
    Indeed. Is it me or are they swarming like midges at the moment?
    Swarming midges, you must be Scottish, not that that disqualifies you on here nor should it
    Nah, I only live in Scotland. I'm English.
  • edmundintokyoedmundintokyo Posts: 14,083
    HYUFD said:

    Is everyone suitably excited about Texas being close?

    Once again I notice a poll showing Trump outperforming Republicans (Public Policy Polling Jun 19-20 has Biden +9, but Dems +11 in the generic ballot). He's clearly not the toxic drag on the ticket I would like to think he was. Trump is still in this.

    There was a Democracy Institute poll on June 7th with Trump ahead of Biden 48% to 47% and in the Electoral College by 293 to 245 votes, with Biden winning Michigan and Wisconsin but Trump picking up New Hampshire and Minnesota since 2016.

    https://www.express.co.uk/news/politics/1292288/US-election-2020-donald-trump-poll-results-democracy-institute-of-america
    Per the write-up they seem to have done a national poll with a sample of 1500 voters, then they taken a subsample of 500 voters in battleground states, so the sample size for each individual state is an average of like 500/6 = 83, presumably even less in the smaller states.

    So maybe stuff the national numbers into an average if you like, but ignore the claims about individual states.
  • alteregoalterego Posts: 1,029
    Surrey said:

    alterego said:

    Surrey said:

    Ave_it said:

    Ave_it said:

    Second like Trump (or will he end up first?) :lol:

    I keep meaning to ask you, do you want Trump to win? I recall you supported him in 2018.
    To be honest I am not keen on Trump but I think Biden is past it and not up to the job. It will be a lot of fun seeing the woke whinging on here if Trump wins!
    I’ll put you on the Trumpton Butt list!

    Lots of them on PB 😉
    Indeed. Is it me or are they swarming like midges at the moment?
    Swarming midges, you must be Scottish, not that that disqualifies you on here nor should it
    Nah, I only live in Scotland. I'm English.
    Good luck with that.
  • Scott_xPScott_xP Posts: 3,599
    Tories gave Robert Jenrick home renovation the go-ahead

    The housing secretary had an extension to his £2.6 million Westminster townhouse approved by Conservative councillors despite officials objecting to the scheme three times, The Times can reveal.

    The couple submitted plans to turn a first-floor roof terrace into an extra room as part of renovations costing £830,000, but the scheme was twice rejected by a planning officer who concluded it would damage the character and appearance of the building and conservation area.

    In August 2014, two months after Mr Jenrick had been elected as a Conservative MP, a third planning application was made. Although the first two had been made in Mr Jenrick’s own name, the latest application was listed in his wife’s name, although she was misgendered as “Mr Michal Berkner”.


    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/edition/news/tories-gave-robert-jenrick-home-renovation-the-go-ahead-9s6580zkm
  • Andy_JSAndy_JS Posts: 6,036
    "The Great Awokening and the Second American Revolution
    Eric Kaufmann"

    https://quillette.com/2020/06/22/toward-a-new-cultural-nationalism/
  • DecrepiterJohnLDecrepiterJohnL Posts: 3,460
    edited June 24
    Scott_xP said:

    Tories gave Robert Jenrick home renovation the go-ahead

    The housing secretary had an extension to his £2.6 million Westminster townhouse approved by Conservative councillors despite officials objecting to the scheme three times, The Times can reveal.

    The couple submitted plans to turn a first-floor roof terrace into an extra room as part of renovations costing £830,000, but the scheme was twice rejected by a planning officer who concluded it would damage the character and appearance of the building and conservation area.

    In August 2014, two months after Mr Jenrick had been elected as a Conservative MP, a third planning application was made. Although the first two had been made in Mr Jenrick’s own name, the latest application was listed in his wife’s name, although she was misgendered as “Mr Michal Berkner”.


    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/edition/news/tories-gave-robert-jenrick-home-renovation-the-go-ahead-9s6580zkm

    It is only Monday that PB had a header on Robert Jenrick's creative approach to the planning system and since then two more stories have emerged: this one, and the Sandown racecourse project. Nothing to see here?

    ETA on Sandown
    The housing secretary is facing fresh scrutiny over his use of planning powers after he intervened in a development project backed by prominent Conservatives and party donors.

    Robert Jenrick has used his ministerial planning powers to recover an appeal by Britain’s largest horse-racing organisation, the Jockey Club, for its development of 318 homes and a hotel at the Sandown Park Racecourse in Esher, Surrey.

    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/housing-secretary-robert-jenrick-mired-in-new-planning-row-kwj0p5n6q (£££)
  • IanB2IanB2 Posts: 26,675
    RobD said:

    It is interesting to see the anecdotes of those PBers who think they have had Covid or know people who have.

    If it turns out that the virus has gone through a large segment of the population asymptomatically then there will be hell to pay (politically) for stopping tests across the population to determine the overall infection rate. The UK only tested people in hospitals.

    Was the lockdown necessary? What would be the political price if people think the lockdown was a mistake?

    The antibody surveys suggest nothing of the sort though.
    CCAD doesn’t show up in antibody tests, though.
  • NigelbNigelb Posts: 22,333
    New Thread.
  • IanB2IanB2 Posts: 26,675
    edited June 24
    New Thread

    But not one that takes comments
  • MysticroseMysticrose Posts: 3,099
    It's not just me then that can't find comments on the new thread.
  • FoxyFoxy Posts: 16,365
    IanB2 said:

    RobD said:

    It is interesting to see the anecdotes of those PBers who think they have had Covid or know people who have.

    If it turns out that the virus has gone through a large segment of the population asymptomatically then there will be hell to pay (politically) for stopping tests across the population to determine the overall infection rate. The UK only tested people in hospitals.

    Was the lockdown necessary? What would be the political price if people think the lockdown was a mistake?

    The antibody surveys suggest nothing of the sort though.
    CCAD doesn’t show up in antibody tests, though.
    Apart from the absence of a spike in death rates, 2 other factors indicate that whatever bug was around in Dec, it was not Covid-19. The flu survey does viral swabs on people with respiratory symptoms on representative GP practices, and did not find it until late Feb. Secondly the genetic tracing shows that there were multiple introductions from Spain and Italy in late Feb.
  • NigelbNigelb Posts: 22,333
    Mike just enjoys all those frustrated firsts...

    This would be on topic:

    Black eyes for Trump, Meadows in North Carolina primary
    https://www.politico.com/news/2020/06/23/trump-meadows-north-carolina-primary-cawthorn-bennett-337223
    ... The result was a blow to Trump, who has boasted about having a perfect endorsement record in congressional primaries. As word of Bennett’s defeat ricochet around Trump’s orbit Tuesday evening, some close to him wondered how he would take the news.

    For Trump, it’s the most striking in a sudden string of downballot setbacks. The North Carolina loss comes less than two weeks after another Trump-endorsed candidate lost his fight for renomination. Rep. Denver Riggleman (R-Va.) lost a district convention attended by roughly 2,500 Republican delegates, many of whom were angered by his officiating a gay wedding last year...
  • IanB2IanB2 Posts: 26,675
    Foxy said:

    IanB2 said:

    RobD said:

    It is interesting to see the anecdotes of those PBers who think they have had Covid or know people who have.

    If it turns out that the virus has gone through a large segment of the population asymptomatically then there will be hell to pay (politically) for stopping tests across the population to determine the overall infection rate. The UK only tested people in hospitals.

    Was the lockdown necessary? What would be the political price if people think the lockdown was a mistake?

    The antibody surveys suggest nothing of the sort though.
    CCAD doesn’t show up in antibody tests, though.
    Apart from the absence of a spike in death rates, 2 other factors indicate that whatever bug was around in Dec, it was not Covid-19. The flu survey does viral swabs on people with respiratory symptoms on representative GP practices, and did not find it until late Feb. Secondly the genetic tracing shows that there were multiple introductions from Spain and Italy in late Feb.
    No, it was Christmas Cold Anecdote Disease, like I said.

    Very contagious, though. Apparently patient zero is, or was, a regular here.
  • DecrepiterJohnLDecrepiterJohnL Posts: 3,460
    Nigelb said:

    Mike just enjoys all those frustrated firsts...

    This would be on topic:

    Black eyes for Trump, Meadows in North Carolina primary
    https://www.politico.com/news/2020/06/23/trump-meadows-north-carolina-primary-cawthorn-bennett-337223
    ... The result was a blow to Trump, who has boasted about having a perfect endorsement record in congressional primaries. As word of Bennett’s defeat ricochet around Trump’s orbit Tuesday evening, some close to him wondered how he would take the news.

    For Trump, it’s the most striking in a sudden string of downballot setbacks. The North Carolina loss comes less than two weeks after another Trump-endorsed candidate lost his fight for renomination. Rep. Denver Riggleman (R-Va.) lost a district convention attended by roughly 2,500 Republican delegates, many of whom were angered by his officiating a gay wedding last year...

    many of whom were angered by his officiating a gay wedding last year...
  • NigelbNigelb Posts: 22,333
    This is an insane idea - a massive travel incentive during a pandemic:
  • Morris_DancerMorris_Dancer Posts: 53,598
    Good morning, everyone.

    F1: got an e-mail. Bit groggy but it sounds like Ladbrokes have made the Hamilton bet mentioned yesterday null and void. No complaints really, I think that's fair, although I may back it again anyway.
  • IanB2IanB2 Posts: 26,675
    Seven US states have reported their highest coronavirus patient admissions in the pandemic so far, as cases surge in the US following the easing of restrictions.Arizona, Arkansas, California, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Texas –which also confirmed a record daily case increase on Tuesday – each admitted record numbers of infected people to hospital, the Washington Post reported.
  • NigelbNigelb Posts: 22,333
    Interesting opinion piece on the age profile, and apparent low death rates from the resurgence in the US:

    People in their 20s and 30s are spreading the virus
    https://edition.cnn.com/2020/06/22/opinions/20-and-30-year-olds-spreading-covid-19-bromage/index.html
    ...In South Korea, with extensive early testing and an enviable contact tracing program, more than 75% of infections were in people under 60 years old, and about 45% of infections were in people under the age of 40.
    In contrast, the US initially had the resources to test only the sickest of patients and because of this limitation in testing capacity, data skewed heavily toward those who were older and more likely to be hospitalized. The rate of viral infections in the elderly caught fire and blazed, and in the effort to contain and stop this unfolding tragedy, we took our eyes off what was happening to the younger people. What was and is their role in this pandemic?
    The role of the young and healthy in this pandemic is beginning to reveal itself.
    The 20- to 40-year-olds appear to be spreading the infection unperceived. They are just as easily infected as the elderly, but much more likely to show no or mild symptoms. People in these age groups are the ones who have allowed the virus to smolder through our communities and erupt into flames when they make contact with a susceptible population.
    Unlike the older populations, where the fraction of tests that are positive have decreased markedly over time -- likely evidence that we are doing better at protecting vulnerable people -- when we look at the 18 to 49-year-olds, we see that the number of positive cases has remained more or less constant throughout time.
    We are now seeing that more than 60% of all infections in the US are occurring in people under the age of 50...
  • eristdooferistdoof Posts: 2,971
    Nigelb said:

    Interesting opinion piece on the age profile, and apparent low death rates from the resurgence in the US:

    People in their 20s and 30s are spreading the virus
    https://edition.cnn.com/2020/06/22/opinions/20-and-30-year-olds-spreading-covid-19-bromage/index.html
    ...In South Korea, with extensive early testing and an enviable contact tracing program, more than 75% of infections were in people under 60 years old, and about 45% of infections were in people under the age of 40.
    In contrast, the US initially had the resources to test only the sickest of patients and because of this limitation in testing capacity, data skewed heavily toward those who were older and more likely to be hospitalized. The rate of viral infections in the elderly caught fire and blazed, and in the effort to contain and stop this unfolding tragedy, we took our eyes off what was happening to the younger people. What was and is their role in this pandemic?
    The role of the young and healthy in this pandemic is beginning to reveal itself.
    The 20- to 40-year-olds appear to be spreading the infection unperceived. They are just as easily infected as the elderly, but much more likely to show no or mild symptoms. People in these age groups are the ones who have allowed the virus to smolder through our communities and erupt into flames when they make contact with a susceptible population.
    Unlike the older populations, where the fraction of tests that are positive have decreased markedly over time -- likely evidence that we are doing better at protecting vulnerable people -- when we look at the 18 to 49-year-olds, we see that the number of positive cases has remained more or less constant throughout time.
    We are now seeing that more than 60% of all infections in the US are occurring in people under the age of 50...

    Cue the comments again to allow under 40's a normal life but having absolutely no contact with anyone over 40.
  • eristdooferistdoof Posts: 2,971
    The comments on the new thread are now active
  • MikeSmithsonMikeSmithson Posts: 6,128

    Comment now possible of following thread

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