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politicalbetting.com » Blog Archive » The betting chances of Commons agreeing deal before March 30th

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  • FoxyFoxy Posts: 14,498
    justin124 said:

    Floater said:

    justin124 said:

    Floater said:

    justin124 said:

    Floater said:

    justin124 said:

    Corbyn showing his narrow minded petulance I see.

    Bodes really well for when he is PM.

    Not entirely. I don't see that Chuka Umunna had any more entitlement to be at such a meeting than others such as Frank Field, Jared Omara - or indeed Fiona Onasanya.
    Throwing his toys out of pram is such a good look at a time of national crisis eh?
    Why should they be treated preferentially compared with other Independent MPs? They have no status as a political party.
    I repeat the question
    Had all the non alligned MPs been invited, he might have taken a different view. There are reports that the agreed terms of the meeting were not adhered to.
    So all you have is excuses
    I am not a Corbyn fan anyway - but can see his point of view on this. If Caroline Lucas was there as the sole Green MP , every Independent ought to have been included.
    Chukka is the chosen spokesperson of the Tiggers, who have significant numbers in a key vote.

    Perhaps should have sent Luciana Berger.
  • SandpitSandpit Posts: 25,247
    Crest on podium. So it’s not an election.
  • dixiedeandixiedean Posts: 6,307
    Sandpit said:

    Sandpit said:

    Just got back from pub. Are we getting the PM on telly tonight?

    8.15
    Ooh, any book running on what she’ll say?

    1. It’s Her Deal or No Deal?
    2. It’s Her Deal or we remain?
    3. Nothing has changed?
    4. Election to be called?
    5. She’s resigning?
    6. Something else.
    Some advice on the best tactic to avoid No Deal could be in there I reckon.
  • dyedwooliedyedwoolie Posts: 7,786

    So we now know that Corbyn is willing to call murderers and terrorists his friends, but refuses to be in a meeting with someone who served Labour faithfully for years ...

    Maybe he got word his jam was boiling over? Or that he has done his 8hr shift for the day already?
    Or maybe he had a conference call with Hamas he couldn't bunk?
  • GardenwalkerGardenwalker Posts: 5,195
    justin124 said:

    Floater said:

    justin124 said:

    Floater said:

    justin124 said:

    Floater said:

    justin124 said:

    Corbyn showing his narrow minded petulance I see.

    Bodes really well for when he is PM.

    Not entirely. I don't see that Chuka Umunna had any more entitlement to be at such a meeting than others such as Frank Field, Jared Omara - or indeed Fiona Onasanya.
    Throwing his toys out of pram is such a good look at a time of national crisis eh?
    Why should they be treated preferentially compared with other Independent MPs? They have no status as a political party.
    I repeat the question
    Had all the non alligned MPs been invited, he might have taken a different view. There are reports that the agreed terms of the meeting were not adhered to.
    So all you have is excuses
    I am not a Corbyn fan anyway - but can see his point of view on this. If Caroline Lucas was there as the sole Green MP , every Independent ought to have been included.
    There are no “rules” for this.
    Corbyn is just being a baby, as usual. He is one of the fathers of Brexit. Necessary, though not sufficient.
  • tottenhamWCtottenhamWC Posts: 351

    Sky just said that TM has told conservative meps at no 10 tonight she will not be PM if we have sitting meps post the EU elections

    Odd threat. Have generally defended her as better than the alternatives but have had enough now.

    Bring in Gove or someone who has a strategic and tactical bone in their body.
  • dyedwooliedyedwoolie Posts: 7,786
    Barnesian said:

    We need the equivalent of the US 25th amendment - removal of PM due to inability to discharge the Powers and Duties of the Office - with the office devolving on the deputy PM. Needs a two-thirds majority of the House.

    Um I think a vote of no confidence covers that?
  • FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 42,504

    So we now know that Corbyn is willing to call murderers and terrorists his friends, but refuses to be in a meeting with someone who served Labour faithfully for years ...

    Maybe he got word his jam was boiling over? Or that he has done his 8hr shift for the day already?
    Or maybe he had a conference call with Hamas he couldn't bunk?
    Well they are having a spot of bother at the moment...their own people are protesting against them.
  • SandpitSandpit Posts: 25,247

    In other news have just won a Gold and Silver award for our products here at the Free From Food Awards. No longer care about Brexit. Getting slammed. On the free bar #drinktoforgetbrexit

    Congratulations, enjoy the party!
  • Mrs May wants her Deal or No Deal.
    Mr Corbyn wants his Deal or no Deal.
    The Conservative Party wants a Better Deal or No Deal.
    The Labour party want to pin No deal on the Conservative party and then strike their Deal.
    Everyone else has their own preferred alternative to No deal and split a accordingly.
    No deal is the default option if nothing else can be agreed.
    No deal is where were are heading fast.

  • tlg86tlg86 Posts: 13,039
    Government crest in place.
  • ralphmalphralphmalph Posts: 2,201

    In other news have just won a Gold and Silver award for our products here at the Free From Food Awards. No longer care about Brexit. Getting slammed. On the free bar #drinktoforgetbrexit

    The person who promotes Raw Gorilla lemon and chia munchies.
    Do I need to stock pile?
  • RecidivistRecidivist Posts: 4,679
    RoyalBlue said:

    IanB2 said:

    Revoke Article 50 and remain in the EU.

    https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/241584

    The counter is spinning happily.

    Let us know when it hits 17.4 million.
    And if it does?
  • LucyJonesLucyJones Posts: 643
    kjh said:

    kjh said:

    kjh said:

    kjh said:

    eek said:

    IanB2 said:

    Revoke Article 50 and remain in the EU.

    https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/241584

    The counter is spinning happily.

    Edit/ and the map of the signatures is interesting.

    Why are we getting excited about 60,000 signatures on that?

    I could see that easily it topping a million soon from those who hitherto supported a 2nd referendum.
    70,000 now....
    So what?
    Unless the number gets huge I don't think it matters one iota, but it is fun watching you get exasperated by it. It is the People's Vote march all over again. I assume you are not going to challenge the numbers though on this are you? :)
    I’m not exasperated I just think it’s irrelevant.

    I certainly will challenge the numbers on the March if I think they’re called out incorrectly, which they almost certainly will be.

    Remember: it was 270k marchers last time, not 700k.
    Taking the bait eh. Only you thought it was 270K.
    Nope. That was in line with all the professional estimates, including neutral posters on here.
    Go on give us a link to 270K that wasn't posted by you.
    https://www.google.co.uk/amp/s/www.telegraph.co.uk/politics/2019/01/05/peoples-vote-march-attended-third-number-organisers-claimed/amp/
    Link to the GLA report? Have you got that? Does it exist? Context? Or are just quoting other Brexiteers like yourself who just made up the numbers. All the other quotes of numbers - Are you just ignoring them or just believing stuff you want to believe?
    Freedom of Information request here:

    https://www.whatdotheyknow.com/request/what_is_the_estimate_of_attendee

    They say 25000, but I assume they missed a zero off. So 250 000.
    Estimate of 1000 attending rival pro-credit march, which presumably also was missing a zero.
  • GardenwalkerGardenwalker Posts: 5,195
    edited March 2019
    RoyalBlue said:

    DougSeal said:

    RoyalBlue said:

    stodge said:

    RoyalBlue said:


    If people want to advertise their self-regard and immaturity, that’s fine. It’s tiresome that they block up the centre of the capital while doing so.

    Do you think those who marched against the Iraq War and those who marched in favour of the Countryside (including a considerable number of Conservatives) were advertising their self regard and immaturity?

    No, because those took place before any decision had been made in Parliament. The nation has voted to leave, in a referendum promised in the winning party’s manifesto, prior to which it was made clear that the decision would be implemented either way. Protesting the implementation of that decision is protesting democracy.
    That’s probably the silliest thing I have ever read on here. There are plenty of protests against settled policy contained in manifestos or referendums. Given that most people in Northern Ireland vote to stay in the union are republican demonstrations inherently undemocratic? Independence protests in Scotland or Quebec? Or anti-EEC demonstrations after the 1975 referendum? Or protests against the Poll Tax? I could go on. Protests are partly there to highlight causes and change views. They are asking for another vote on Saturday. It’s pushing the bounds of credulity to cal that “protrsting democracy”.
    In a country with a free press and competitive elections, most protest is seldom justified. In authoritarian regimes, it’s an act of bravery.

    They can be a very easy way to lose support, as well as gain it. I remember the huge amount of junk left on my morning walk to work after the anti-austerity protests and the last Remoaner fest. It didn’t endear me to either.
    “Most protest is seldom justified”

    Proto-fascism or just utter tosh?
  • In other news have just won a Gold and Silver award for our products here at the Free From Food Awards. No longer care about Brexit. Getting slammed. On the free bar #drinktoforgetbrexit

    Many congratulations
  • justin124justin124 Posts: 9,387
    Floater said:

    justin124 said:

    Floater said:

    justin124 said:

    Floater said:

    justin124 said:

    Floater said:

    justin124 said:

    Corbyn showing his narrow minded petulance I see.

    Bodes really well for when he is PM.

    Not entirely. I don't see that Chuka Umunna had any more entitlement to be at such a meeting than others such as Frank Field, Jared Omara - or indeed Fiona Onasanya.
    Throwing his toys out of pram is such a good look at a time of national crisis eh?
    Why should they be treated preferentially compared with other Independent MPs? They have no status as a political party.
    I repeat the question
    Had all the non alligned MPs been invited, he might have taken a different view. There are reports that the agreed terms of the meeting were not adhered to.
    So all you have is excuses
    I am not a Corbyn fan anyway - but can see his point of view on this. If Caroline Lucas was there as the sole Green MP , every Independent ought to have been included.
    Thats not why he walked out though is it
    I suspect he would have taken a different view had the TIG MPs followed the example of Douglas Carswell & Mark Reckless and sought the support of their electors in by elections. Doubtless he sees them as lacking legitimacy.
  • BarnesianBarnesian Posts: 5,690

    Barnesian said:

    We need the equivalent of the US 25th amendment - removal of PM due to inability to discharge the Powers and Duties of the Office - with the office devolving on the deputy PM. Needs a two-thirds majority of the House.

    Um I think a vote of no confidence covers that?
    We need a VNOC in the PM herself with all MPs taking part - not just Tories.
  • ralphmalphralphmalph Posts: 2,201
    Foxy said:

    justin124 said:

    Floater said:

    justin124 said:

    Floater said:

    justin124 said:

    Floater said:

    justin124 said:

    Corbyn showing his narrow minded petulance I see.

    Bodes really well for when he is PM.

    Not entirely. I don't see that Chuka Umunna had any more entitlement to be at such a meeting than others such as Frank Field, Jared Omara - or indeed Fiona Onasanya.
    Throwing his toys out of pram is such a good look at a time of national crisis eh?
    Why should they be treated preferentially compared with other Independent MPs? They have no status as a political party.
    I repeat the question
    Had all the non alligned MPs been invited, he might have taken a different view. There are reports that the agreed terms of the meeting were not adhered to.
    So all you have is excuses
    I am not a Corbyn fan anyway - but can see his point of view on this. If Caroline Lucas was there as the sole Green MP , every Independent ought to have been included.
    Chukka is the chosen spokesperson of the Tiggers, who have significant numbers in a key vote.

    Perhaps should have sent Luciana Berger.
    Soubry was present as well.
  • JosiasJessopJosiasJessop Posts: 24,348

    Sky just said that TM has told conservative meps at no 10 tonight she will not be PM if we have sitting meps post the EU elections

    Odd threat. Have generally defended her as better than the alternatives but have had enough now.

    Bring in Gove or someone who has a strategic and tactical bone in their body.
    May's entire problem is you cannot make a strategy, yet alone tactics, when everyone is acting so childishly on your (the UK's) side, and you have to negotiate with external parties.

    IMV no-one could have squared the Brexit circle. And that's because of the central lie at the heart of the leave campaigns.
  • WhisperingOracleWhisperingOracle Posts: 2,327
    edited March 2019
    tlg86 said:

    Government crest in place.

    A phrase for which "crestfallen" was invented.
  • kjhkjh Posts: 1,350

    Foxy said:

    Foxy said:

    RoyalBlue said:

    Foxy said:

    kjh said:

    kjh said:

    eek said:

    IanB2 said:



    .

    .
    .
    I’m not exasperated I just think it’s irrelevant.

    I certainly will challenge the numbers on the March if I think they’re called out incorrectly, which they almost certainly will be.

    Remember: it was 270k marchers last time, not 700k.
    Taking the bait eh. Only you thought it was 270K.
    Yeah, @Casino_Royale wasn't there to count.

    It was the second biggest political demonstration in British history, and the forecast looks good for Saturday to be a similar size.
    If people want to advertise their self-regard and immaturity, that’s fine. It’s tiresome that they block up the centre of the capital while doing so.
    Freedom of peaceful and protest are fundamental parts of a working democracy.

    I am quite looking forward to Saturday, have my flags and signs ready, and have invested in a new megaphone. Mrs Foxy wants to march with the Tiggers, so we shall.
    The 100k was expectations management so the organisers could report an “unexpected” “surge” in numbers on the day.

    These people are advised by the likes of Alastair Campbell, know what they are doing when it comes to spin and are very, very good at it.
    No, it was genuinely unexpectedly much larger than the June event. Certainly the very light police presence and lack of preparation by London Transport showed that those organisations did not expect so many. Fortunately the supreme good humour of the crowd prevented problems.

    You know 16 million voted Remain and that many are as passionate as you are for Leave. Wy are you so surprised that they want to publically express their views?
    Your naivety is almost touching.

    Your confirmation bias far less so.
    CS when you get into one of these discussions you remind me of Plato. You are filtering out all the evidence and picking what suits you no matter how self deluding it looks, but believe others are doing the same and you are not. And you don't need to cos you have solid arguments, but getting into an argument over the numbers in a crowd is pointless and just leads others to bait you. All that matters was it was enormous. Whether that matters or not is debatable, but trying to argue with people it was smaller than it looks, makes you look silly. Does Trump and his crowd estimates come to mind at all?
  • justin124 said:

    Floater said:

    justin124 said:

    Floater said:

    justin124 said:

    Floater said:

    justin124 said:

    Floater said:

    justin124 said:

    Corbyn showing his narrow minded petulance I see.

    Bodes really well for when he is PM.

    Not entirely. I don't see that Chuka Umunna had any more entitlement to be at such a meeting than others such as Frank Field, Jared Omara - or indeed Fiona Onasanya.
    Throwing his toys out of pram is such a good look at a time of national crisis eh?
    Why should they be treated preferentially compared with other Independent MPs? They have no status as a political party.
    I repeat the question
    Had all the non alligned MPs been invited, he might have taken a different view. There are reports that the agreed terms of the meeting were not adhered to.
    So all you have is excuses
    I am not a Corbyn fan anyway - but can see his point of view on this. If Caroline Lucas was there as the sole Green MP , every Independent ought to have been included.
    Thats not why he walked out though is it
    I suspect he would have taken a different view had the TIG MPs followed the example of Douglas Carswell & Mark Reckless and sought the support of their electors in by elections. Doubtless he sees them as lacking legitimacy.
    He is childish, petty, and not fit to lead a once great party
  • BarnesianBarnesian Posts: 5,690
    I think I need a whisky before this speech. She's driving me to drink.
  • Harris_TweedHarris_Tweed Posts: 1,240
    justin124 said:

    Floater said:

    justin124 said:

    Floater said:

    justin124 said:

    Floater said:

    justin124 said:

    Corbyn showing his narrow minded petulance I see.

    Bodes really well for when he is PM.

    Not entirely. I don't see that Chuka Umunna had any more entitlement to be at such a meeting than others such as Frank Field, Jared Omara - or indeed Fiona Onasanya.
    Throwing his toys out of pram is such a good look at a time of national crisis eh?
    Why should they be treated preferentially compared with other Independent MPs? They have no status as a political party.
    I repeat the question
    Had all the non alligned MPs been invited, he might have taken a different view. There are reports that the agreed terms of the meeting were not adhered to.
    So all you have is excuses
    I am not a Corbyn fan anyway - but can see his point of view on this. If Caroline Lucas was there as the sole Green MP , every Independent ought to have been included.
    Hm.. party or not, leader or not, Chuka is spokesman for a group of 11* MPs which TM might want to influence. I can see why she'd ask him. I can also see why Corbyn would jump at a reason not to be seen talking to Tories, his MO throughout this.

    (* and probably counting, depending how much TM's pissed off her moderate wing today)
  • PulpstarPulpstar Posts: 57,993
    Corbyn stormed out the meeting because Chuka was present - arf !
  • dyedwooliedyedwoolie Posts: 7,786
    Barnesian said:

    Barnesian said:

    We need the equivalent of the US 25th amendment - removal of PM due to inability to discharge the Powers and Duties of the Office - with the office devolving on the deputy PM. Needs a two-thirds majority of the House.

    Um I think a vote of no confidence covers that?
    We need a VNOC in the PM herself with all MPs taking part - not just Tories.
    A VONC in the government removes the PM and then it's up to the house to find a new one or go to GE. What sort if governing party is going to fail to remove its leader on its own rules but do so in parliament??
  • Barnesian said:

    I think I need a whisky before this speech. She's driving me to drink.

    Coincidentally I've just had the first brandy of the week.
  • OblitusSumMeOblitusSumMe Posts: 9,143

    So we now know that Corbyn is willing to call murderers and terrorists his friends, but refuses to be in a meeting with someone who served Labour faithfully for years ...

    That's only a very narrow point.

    We know he is petulant. We know he cares a lot more about the appearance of things than the substance of them - the sort of charge one might have made of Blairites, rather deliciously. We know that he prefers creating division rather than bringing people together. We know he does not tolerate dissent or disagreement.

    It's a litany of damming personal and political weaknesses that would make him a disastrous Prime Minister.
  • GardenwalkerGardenwalker Posts: 5,195
    edited March 2019

    Sky just said that TM has told conservative meps at no 10 tonight she will not be PM if we have sitting meps post the EU elections

    Odd threat. Have generally defended her as better than the alternatives but have had enough now.

    Bring in Gove or someone who has a strategic and tactical bone in their body.
    May's entire problem is you cannot make a strategy, yet alone tactics, when everyone is acting so childishly on your (the UK's) side, and you have to negotiate with external parties.

    IMV no-one could have squared the Brexit circle. And that's because of the central lie at the heart of the leave campaigns.
    Disagree.

    In those first few months of May, she had tremendous power to set the narrative.

    Instead, she caved to the ERGer tendency at the first whiff of Mark Francois’s underpants.
  • SlackbladderSlackbladder Posts: 8,128
    All these MPs are utter self-absorbed and venal....
  • justin124justin124 Posts: 9,387

    justin124 said:

    Floater said:

    justin124 said:

    Floater said:

    justin124 said:

    Floater said:

    justin124 said:

    Floater said:

    justin124 said:

    Corbyn showing his narrow minded petulance I see.

    Bodes really well for when he is PM.

    Not entirely. I don't see that Chuka Umunna had any more entitlement to be at such a meeting than others such as Frank Field, Jared Omara - or indeed Fiona Onasanya.
    Throwing his toys out of pram is such a good look at a time of national crisis eh?
    Why should they be treated preferentially compared with other Independent MPs? They have no status as a political party.
    I repeat the question
    Had all the non alligned MPs been invited, he might have taken a different view. There are reports that the agreed terms of the meeting were not adhered to.
    So all you have is excuses
    I am not a Corbyn fan anyway - but can see his point of view on this. If Caroline Lucas was there as the sole Green MP , every Independent ought to have been included.
    Thats not why he walked out though is it
    I suspect he would have taken a different view had the TIG MPs followed the example of Douglas Carswell & Mark Reckless and sought the support of their electors in by elections. Doubtless he sees them as lacking legitimacy.
    He is childish, petty, and not fit to lead a once great party
    There are precedents for him to follow in that regard - such as Cameron's refusal to participate in all the 2015 election debates and Mays failure to take part at all in 2017.
  • GardenwalkerGardenwalker Posts: 5,195
    edited March 2019

    Sky just said that TM has told conservative meps at no 10 tonight she will not be PM if we have sitting meps post the EU elections

    Odd threat. Have generally defended her as better than the alternatives but have had enough now.

    Bring in Gove or someone who has a strategic and tactical bone in their body.
    May's entire problem is you cannot make a strategy, yet alone tactics, when everyone is acting so childishly on your (the UK's) side, and you have to negotiate with external parties.

    IMV no-one could have squared the Brexit circle. And that's because of the central lie at the heart of the leave campaigns.
    Disagree.

    In those first few months of May, she had tremendous power to set the narrative.

    Instead, she caved to the ERGer tendency at the first whiff of Mark Francois’s underpants. She has continued to do so at every single opportunity.
  • FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 42,504
    justin124 said:

    justin124 said:

    Floater said:

    justin124 said:

    Floater said:

    justin124 said:

    Floater said:

    justin124 said:

    Floater said:

    justin124 said:

    Corbyn showing his narrow minded petulance I see.

    Bodes really well for when he is PM.

    Not entirely. I don't see that Chuka Umunna had any more entitlement to be at such a meeting than others such as Frank Field, Jared Omara - or indeed Fiona Onasanya.
    Throwing his toys out of pram is such a good look at a time of national crisis eh?
    Why should they be treated preferentially compared with other Independent MPs? They have no status as a political party.
    I repeat the question
    Had all the non alligned MPs been invited, he might have taken a different view. There are reports that the agreed terms of the meeting were not adhered to.
    So all you have is excuses
    I am not a Corbyn fan anyway - but can see his point of view on this. If Caroline Lucas was there as the sole Green MP , every Independent ought to have been included.
    Thats not why he walked out though is it
    I suspect he would have taken a different view had the TIG MPs followed the example of Douglas Carswell & Mark Reckless and sought the support of their electors in by elections. Doubtless he sees them as lacking legitimacy.
    He is childish, petty, and not fit to lead a once great party
    There are precedents for him to follow in that regard - such as Cameron's refusal to participate in all the 2015 election debates and Mays failure to take part at all in 2017.
    Oh give over...
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 52,908

    Mrs May wants her Deal or No Deal.
    Mr Corbyn wants his Deal or no Deal.
    The Conservative Party wants a Better Deal or No Deal.
    The Labour party want to pin No deal on the Conservative party and then strike their Deal.
    Everyone else has their own preferred alternative to No deal and split a accordingly.
    No deal is the default option if nothing else can be agreed.
    No deal is where were are heading fast.

    Totally wrong. We're heading there agonizingly slowly even with barely a week to go.
  • In other news have just won a Gold and Silver award for our products here at the Free From Food Awards. No longer care about Brexit. Getting slammed. On the free bar #drinktoforgetbrexit

    The person who promotes Raw Gorilla lemon and chia munchies.
    Do I need to stock pile?
    That particular SKU just won gold as well
  • oldpoliticsoldpolitics Posts: 455

    Barnesian said:

    Barnesian said:

    We need the equivalent of the US 25th amendment - removal of PM due to inability to discharge the Powers and Duties of the Office - with the office devolving on the deputy PM. Needs a two-thirds majority of the House.

    Um I think a vote of no confidence covers that?
    We need a VNOC in the PM herself with all MPs taking part - not just Tories.
    A VONC in the government removes the PM and then it's up to the house to find a new one or go to GE. What sort if governing party is going to fail to remove its leader on its own rules but do so in parliament??
    One where it takes a majority of Conservative MPs to remove her using the Conservative rules, but only a dozen or so to remove her in Parliament?
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 52,908
    I wonder if any member of the paid commentariat will be able to come up with an even half way unique or fresh observation to make on May's upcoming statement. A prize to those who resist putting in cliche'd comments from MPs feverishly texting them.
  • IanB2IanB2 Posts: 25,458

    Seems May has told the leaders and the Tig2 that she will leave with no deal. The Tig2 believe her.

    I think she would as well. I think she does take her pledge to leave incredibly seriously. Now that might be massively misguided, particularly as I think she believes no deal is a bad outcome. But delivering Brexit overrides everything else in TMWorld. I’ve said it before - it’s a legacy thing.
    The legacy of breaking her party, probably the economy, and possibly the union. So it's a bluff.
  • DougSealDougSeal Posts: 1,680
    edited March 2019
    RoyalBlue said:

    DougSeal said:

    RoyalBlue said:

    stodge said:

    RoyalBlue said:


    If people want to advertise their self-regard and immaturity, that’s fine. It’s tiresome that they block up the centre of the capital while doing so.

    Do you think those who marched against the Iraq War and those who marched in favour of the Countryside (including a considerable number of Conservatives) were advertising their self regard and immaturity?

    No, because those took place before any decision had been made in Parliament. The nation has voted to leave, in a referendum promised in the winning party’s manifesto, prior to which it was made clear that the decision would be implemented either way. Protesting the implementation of that decision is protesting democracy.
    That’s probably the silliest thing I have ever read on here. There are plenty of protests against settled policy contained in manifestos or referendums. Given that most people in Northern Ireland vote to stay in the union are republican demonstrations inherently undemocratic? Independence protests in Scotland or Quebec? Or anti-EEC demonstrations after the 1975 referendum? Or protests against the Poll Tax? I could go on. Protests are partly there to highlight causes and change views. They are asking for another vote on Saturday. It’s pushing the bounds of credulity to cal that “protrsting democracy”.
    In a country with a free press and competitive elections, most protest is seldom justified. In authoritarian regimes, it’s an act of bravery.

    They can be a very easy way to lose support, as well as gain it. I remember the huge amount of junk left on my morning walk to work after the anti-austerity protests and the last Remoaner fest. It didn’t endear me to either.
    Protests are people exercising their right to free speech and assembly at the same time and calling attention to causes. Doubtless in your world Jim Crow and segregation could have been overturned with a polite letter writing campaign by Dr King, and the suffragttes were better off asking nicely for the vote. Suggesting you can exercise only one fundamental right at a time is illiberal and we live in a liberal democracy.

    The road from Twickenham Station to the stadium is covered in crap after any game there but you’re not advocating banning rugby.

    Oh, and do try to find another ad hominem than the dreadfully tired and hackneyed “remoaner” - it’s SO 2016 my dear.

  • FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 42,504
    We have already had a load of indicative votes....
  • IanB2IanB2 Posts: 25,458
    Lidlington already promised indicative votes, a promise now broken. Hence why MPs are so angry.
  • PulpstarPulpstar Posts: 57,993
    Well at least we know how serious Corbyn is about compromise. I know Chuka isn't everyone's cup of tea but he does lead a group of MPs larger in number than Plaid, DUP and Lib Dems
  • dixiedeandixiedean Posts: 6,307

    Barnesian said:

    Barnesian said:

    We need the equivalent of the US 25th amendment - removal of PM due to inability to discharge the Powers and Duties of the Office - with the office devolving on the deputy PM. Needs a two-thirds majority of the House.

    Um I think a vote of no confidence covers that?
    We need a VNOC in the PM herself with all MPs taking part - not just Tories.
    A VONC in the government removes the PM and then it's up to the house to find a new one or go to GE. What sort if governing party is going to fail to remove its leader on its own rules but do so in parliament??
    One where it takes a majority of Conservative MPs to remove her using the Conservative rules, but only a dozen or so to remove her in Parliament?
    One is a secret ballot. Would be interesting if the other one was too. How many switchers...both ways?
  • GardenwalkerGardenwalker Posts: 5,195
    IanB2 said:

    Lidlington already promised indicative votes, a promise now broken. Hence why MPs are so angry.
    MPs also voted an amendment that May would seek a long delay if MV3 were not to pass by today.

    And May promises the Remainers in her Cabinet she would not use Hard Brexit as a threat to force through her Deal.

    May was, is, and will always be - a sweet lying hound.
  • IanB2IanB2 Posts: 25,458

    We have already had a load of indicative votes....
    No, we have had yes/no amendments, with government and labour whipping. Indicative votes would be free votes and MPs could vote for all of the propositions they would be prepared to support.
  • asjohnstoneasjohnstone Posts: 1,276
    Is she on yet ?
  • JosiasJessopJosiasJessop Posts: 24,348

    Sky just said that TM has told conservative meps at no 10 tonight she will not be PM if we have sitting meps post the EU elections

    Odd threat. Have generally defended her as better than the alternatives but have had enough now.

    Bring in Gove or someone who has a strategic and tactical bone in their body.
    May's entire problem is you cannot make a strategy, yet alone tactics, when everyone is acting so childishly on your (the UK's) side, and you have to negotiate with external parties.

    IMV no-one could have squared the Brexit circle. And that's because of the central lie at the heart of the leave campaigns.
    Disagree.

    In those first few months of May, she had tremendous power to set the narrative.

    Instead, she caved to the ERGer tendency at the first whiff of Mark Francois’s underpants. She has continued to do so at every single opportunity.
    So good you said it twice. ;)

    I see it differently: the ERGers position was obvious, and she was bowing to the inevitable. And at least by doing that she made progress: ignoring it would have made any progress impossible.

    It's easy to forget that May's deal has the support from many who you would not necessarily expect to support it, for instance Richard Tyndall and CR on here. Many previous remainers also support it. It's just that for others, on both sides, compromise is impossible. And that would have been as true two years ago as it is now.
  • SlackbladderSlackbladder Posts: 8,128
    Are we expecting anything other than 'nothing has changed'?

    Come on MPs, break the party whip, get a grip and get control.
  • GIN1138GIN1138 Posts: 17,516
    edited March 2019
    Scott_P said:
    She's going soon anyway (always was going to be this Spring/Summer IMO) but she's got Brexit to deliver first....
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 52,908
    Scott_P said:
    Sounds like a very diplomatic version of what was probably said.
  • dixiedeandixiedean Posts: 6,307
    Is May ever on time? MV3 on March 30th anyone?
  • kle4 said:

    Mrs May wants her Deal or No Deal.
    Mr Corbyn wants his Deal or no Deal.
    The Conservative Party wants a Better Deal or No Deal.
    The Labour party want to pin No deal on the Conservative party and then strike their Deal.
    Everyone else has their own preferred alternative to No deal and split a accordingly.
    No deal is the default option if nothing else can be agreed.
    No deal is where were are heading fast.

    Totally wrong. We're heading there agonizingly slowly even with barely a week to go.
    Fair point. Can I substitute fast for nexorably ?
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 52,908

    Are we expecting anything other than 'nothing has changed'?

    Come on MPs, break the party whip, get a grip and get control.

    Indeed. I expect the reason the statement is inside this time so that we know for certain they are not just replaying the last one she made.
  • GIN1138GIN1138 Posts: 17,516
    dixiedean said:

    Is May ever on time? MV3 on March 30th anyone?

    Perhaps she's having meetings with ministerial colleagues and others? :D
  • RecidivistRecidivist Posts: 4,679

    kle4 said:

    Foxy said:

    RoyalBlue said:

    Foxy said:

    kjh said:

    kjh said:

    eek said:

    IanB2 said:

    Revoke Article 50 and remain in the EU.

    https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/241584

    The counter is spinning happily.

    Edit/ and the map of the signatures is interesting.

    Why are we getting excited about 60,000 signatures on that?

    I could see that easily it topping a million soon from those who hitherto supported a 2nd referendum.
    70,000 now....
    So what?
    Un
    I’m not exasperated I just think it’s irrelevant.

    I certainly will challenge the numbers on the March if I think they’re called out incorrectly, which they almost certainly will be.

    Remember: it was 270k marchers last time, not 700k.
    Taking the bait eh. Only you thought it was 270K.
    Yeah, @Casino_Royale wasn't there to count.

    It was the second biggest political demonstration in British history, and the forecast looks good for Saturday to be a similar size.
    If people want to advertise their self-regard and immaturity, that’s fine. It’s tiresome that they block up the centre of the capital while doing so.
    Freedom of peaceful and protest are fundamental parts of a working democracy.



    I am quite looking forward to Saturday, have my flags and signs ready, and have invested in a new megaphone. Mrs Foxy wants to march with the Tiggers, so we shall.
    The 100k was expectations management so the organisers could report an “unexpected” “surge” in numbers on the day.

    These people are advised by the likes of Alastair Campbell, know what they are doing when it comes to spin and are very, very good at it.
    It seems pointless to even estimate crowd numbers. Protestors always say it is one number, police estimates are then much much lower, stories are run on it being difficulty to estimate, and if someone is committed to the most or least impressive number it never persuades anyone else anyway. It was clearly a lot, beyond that no one will agree.
    But the police didn’t do their job that time.

    So it’s up to us to challenge the propaganda.
    Yawn. Trafalgar Square is well known to hold about 45,000 people. The October March filled well over a dozen Trafalgar Squares. I don't find the 700,000 figure remotely difficult to believe.
  • IanB2IanB2 Posts: 25,458

    IanB2 said:

    Lidlington already promised indicative votes, a promise now broken. Hence why MPs are so angry.
    MPs also voted an amendment that May would seek a long delay if MV3 were not to pass by today.

    And May promises the Remainers in her Cabinet she would not use Hard Brexit as a threat to force through her Deal.

    May was, is, and will always be - a sweet lying hound.
    Her dishonesty is hard to stomach, from any perspective. Calling the GE wasn't an aberration after all.
  • rottenboroughrottenborough Posts: 30,971
    From "no one is talking about leaving the single market" to this:

  • IanB2IanB2 Posts: 25,458

    kle4 said:

    Foxy said:

    RoyalBlue said:

    Foxy said:

    kjh said:

    kjh said:

    eek said:

    IanB2 said:

    Revoke Article 50 and remain in the EU.

    https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/241584

    The counter is spinning happily.

    Edit/ and the map of the signatures is interesting.

    Why are we getting excited about 60,000 signatures on that?

    I could see that easily it topping a million soon from those who hitherto supported a 2nd referendum.
    70,000 now....
    So what?
    Un
    I’m not exasperated I just think it’s irrelevant.

    I certainly will challenge the numbers on the March if I think they’re called out incorrectly, which they almost certainly will be.

    Remember: it was 270k marchers last time, not 700k.
    Taking the bait eh. Only you thought it was 270K.
    Yeah, @Casino_Royale wasn't there to count.

    It was the second biggest political demonstration in British history, and the forecast looks good for Saturday to be a similar size.
    If people want to advertise their self-regard and immaturity, that’s fine. It’s tiresome that they block up the centre of the capital while doing so.
    Freedom of peaceful and protest are fundamental parts of a working democracy.



    I am quite looking forward to Saturday, have my flags and signs ready, and have invested in a new megaphone. Mrs Foxy wants to march with the Tiggers, so we shall.
    The 100k was expectations management so the organisers could report an “unexpected” “surge” in numbers on the day.

    These people are advised by the likes of Alastair Campbell, know what they are doing when it comes to spin and are very, very good at it.
    It seems pointless to even estimate crowd numbers. Protestors always say it is one number, police estimates are then much much lower, stories are run on it being difficulty to estimate, and if someone is committed to the most or least impressive number it never persuades anyone else anyway. It was clearly a lot, beyond that no one will agree.
    But the police didn’t do their job that time.

    So it’s up to us to challenge the propaganda.
    Yawn. Trafalgar Square is well known to hold about 45,000 people. The October March filled well over a dozen Trafalgar Squares. I don't find the 700,000 figure remotely difficult to believe.
    Don't feed the CR troll....
  • BarnesianBarnesian Posts: 5,690
  • AndrewAndrew Posts: 2,457


    MPs also voted an amendment that May would seek a long delay if MV3 were not to pass by today.

    Nope.
  • El_CapitanoEl_Capitano Posts: 2,316
    The revoke petition looks like it’ll tip over to 100k just as May starts speaking. Apt.
  • IanB2IanB2 Posts: 25,458
    Pulpstar said:

    Well at least we know how serious Corbyn is about compromise. I know Chuka isn't everyone's cup of tea but he does lead a group of MPs larger in number than Plaid, DUP and Lib Dems

    Isn't he still on 11?
  • ReggieCideReggieCide Posts: 4,312
    Pulpstar said:

    Well at least we know how serious Corbyn is about compromise. I know Chuka isn't everyone's cup of tea but he does lead a group of MPs larger in number than Plaid, DUP and Lib Dems

    I can't be bothered to count so is the Green party included or doesn't it actually count?
  • GIN1138GIN1138 Posts: 17,516
    IanB2 said:

    IanB2 said:

    Lidlington already promised indicative votes, a promise now broken. Hence why MPs are so angry.
    MPs also voted an amendment that May would seek a long delay if MV3 were not to pass by today.

    And May promises the Remainers in her Cabinet she would not use Hard Brexit as a threat to force through her Deal.

    May was, is, and will always be - a sweet lying hound.
    Her dishonesty is hard to stomach, from any perspective. Calling the GE wasn't an aberration after all.
    The way May is now turning into a crazed No Dealer with just a week to go is like a WWF wrestler going from face to heel...

    She'll be smashing Bercow over the head with a chair next. :D
  • rottenboroughrottenborough Posts: 30,971
    Corbyn top trend on twitter. Bet not in a good way either.
  • dyedwooliedyedwoolie Posts: 7,786
    Mason cracking off a comrade wank there
  • kle4kle4 Posts: 52,908
    GIN1138 said:

    IanB2 said:

    IanB2 said:

    Lidlington already promised indicative votes, a promise now broken. Hence why MPs are so angry.
    MPs also voted an amendment that May would seek a long delay if MV3 were not to pass by today.

    And May promises the Remainers in her Cabinet she would not use Hard Brexit as a threat to force through her Deal.

    May was, is, and will always be - a sweet lying hound.
    Her dishonesty is hard to stomach, from any perspective. Calling the GE wasn't an aberration after all.
    The way May is now turning into a crazed No Dealer with just a week to go is like a WWF wrestler going from face to heel...

    She'll be smashing Bercow over the head with a chair next. :D
    In his defence I don't think anyone would dispute that that would indeed be a serious breach of parliamentary procedure.
  • FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 42,504

    Corbyn top trend on twitter. Bet not in a good way either.

    The cult will still find a way to claim he is the bigger better man doing everything to stop Brexit....
  • dyedwooliedyedwoolie Posts: 7,786
    GIN1138 said:

    IanB2 said:

    IanB2 said:

    Lidlington already promised indicative votes, a promise now broken. Hence why MPs are so angry.
    MPs also voted an amendment that May would seek a long delay if MV3 were not to pass by today.

    And May promises the Remainers in her Cabinet she would not use Hard Brexit as a threat to force through her Deal.

    May was, is, and will always be - a sweet lying hound.
    Her dishonesty is hard to stomach, from any perspective. Calling the GE wasn't an aberration after all.
    The way May is now turning into a crazed No Dealer with just a week to go is like a WWF wrestler going from face to heel...

    She'll be smashing Bercow over the head with a chair next. :D
    Stone cold! Stone cold!
  • mattmatt Posts: 3,770
    edited March 2019
    A midlife crisis in slow motion is a remarkable thing.
  • RogerRoger Posts: 12,698
    Corbyn is giving May a rare opportuniy to look reasonable. Whoever decided on the phrase 'stormed out of the meeting' didn't do Jeremy any favours
  • rottenboroughrottenborough Posts: 30,971

    Mason cracking off a comrade wank there
    Is eating cheese and biscuits a elite, neo-liberal thing now?

    I had no idea.

    I am a member of the elite at last!

    PS. I bet Mason never goes to any dinner parties in London.
  • RecidivistRecidivist Posts: 4,679
    The Revoke Article 50 is putting on votes at about 300 a minute right now. If you are quick you'll see it hit 100,000

    https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/241584
  • dyedwooliedyedwoolie Posts: 7,786

    Corbyn top trend on twitter. Bet not in a good way either.

    The cult will still find a way to claim he is the bigger better man doing everything to stop Brexit....
    That or they will say something about hating jews
  • SlackbladderSlackbladder Posts: 8,128
    matt said:

    A midlife crisis in slow motion is a remarkable thing.
    How do I get an invite to the 'cheese and biscuits' circuit..?
  • FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 42,504

    Mason cracking off a comrade wank there
    Is eating cheese and biscuits a elite, neo-liberal thing now?

    I had no idea.

    I am a member of the elite at last!

    PS. I bet Mason never goes to any dinner parties in London.
    Well they are all vegan now so no cheese....
  • ReggieCideReggieCide Posts: 4,312

    Mason cracking off a comrade wank there
    Does "you couldn't make it up" do it anymore?
  • dyedwooliedyedwoolie Posts: 7,786

    matt said:

    A midlife crisis in slow motion is a remarkable thing.
    How do I get an invite to the 'cheese and biscuits' circuit..?
    According to labour just observe the sabbath and you're in
  • dixiedeandixiedean Posts: 6,307
    When they said statement at 2030, did anyone check if that was time or year?
  • spire2spire2 Posts: 170
    has she done a runner?
  • El_CapitanoEl_Capitano Posts: 2,316


    My guess on exactly how short is: three words, approximately an anagram of "nation shagged nchh".
  • ralphmalphralphmalph Posts: 2,201
    Blackford on Sky. We need a second referendum. Can someone explain the SNP strategy to me, because if they get another ref and win, then all that will happen is the other political parties will say "Another referendum, just like you wanted in the EU ref." I would have thought the SNP would be defending referendums with small majorities to the hilt.
  • ReggieCideReggieCide Posts: 4,312
    Roger said:

    Corbyn is giving May a rare opportuniy to look reasonable. Whoever decided on the phrase 'stormed out of the meeting' didn't do Jeremy any favours

    would "flounced" have been more favourable?
  • Just fucking resign for Christ sake
  • dyedwooliedyedwoolie Posts: 7,786

    Mason cracking off a comrade wank there
    Does "you couldn't make it up" do it anymore?
    No, only breathless self abuse justifies the righteousness
  • rpjsrpjs Posts: 2,528
    spire2 said:

    has she done a runner?

    She's waiting for the petition to hit 100,000 so she can announce revocation. :)
  • FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 42,504

    Just fucking resign for Christ sake

    Are you talking about jezza?
This discussion has been closed.