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politicalbetting.com » Blog Archive » The overnight developments in Brussels barely move the Brexit

SystemSystem Posts: 6,666
edited April 11 in General

imagepoliticalbetting.com » Blog Archive » The overnight developments in Brussels barely move the Brexit betting markets

A quick look across the Brexit related betting markets suggest that there has been relatively little movement given the developments last night. That might be because Theresa May didn’t get her very short extension and neither did the EU leadership get their longer one.

Read the full story here


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Comments

  • FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 33,782
    edited April 11
    First....as in the exit may should be departing from #10 today.
  • FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 33,782
    Totally O/T...for fans of the good wife / good fight, the new season has Michael Sheen play a crazier individual than colin sweeney.
  • TGOHFTGOHF Posts: 19,885
    edited April 11

    Totally O/T...for fans of the good wife / good fight, the new season has Michael Sheen play a crazier individual than colin sweeney.

    He's the best thing about this series - the show has lost its way a bit IMHO. It's so achingly "woke" it's boring.
  • TheuniondivvieTheuniondivvie Posts: 13,977
    Nothing has changed, still weak and unstable.
  • Totally O/T...for fans of the good wife / good fight, the new season has Michael Sheen play a crazier individual than colin sweeney.

    He was in last week's episode he was great but he's no Colin Sweeney.
  • IanB2IanB2 Posts: 16,802
    Fifth like Boris
  • FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 33,782

    Totally O/T...for fans of the good wife / good fight, the new season has Michael Sheen play a crazier individual than colin sweeney.

    He was in last week's episode he was great but he's no Colin Sweeney.
    Wait and see.....
  • AlastairMeeksAlastairMeeks Posts: 24,125
    Is it not free money that the UK will hold EU elections now? The order has been given to extend to 31 October, so what's going to stop them?
  • NemtynakhtNemtynakht Posts: 1,412
    How did everyone vote in 2016 and what would they do in a further referendum? I’d love to know how many have changed their. I don’t. I’ll start

    Remain, then WA or remain if Remain vs no deal
  • TGOHFTGOHF Posts: 19,885

    Is it not free money that the UK will hold EU elections now? The order has been given to extend to 31 October, so what's going to stop them?

    Yes. And it has been for a few weeks.
  • Richard_NabaviRichard_Nabavi Posts: 22,131

    Is it not free money that the UK will hold EU elections now? The order has been given to extend to 31 October, so what's going to stop them?

    Parliament agreeing the deal next week, allowing a smooth exit in May or June.

    Well, you did ask...
  • IanB2IanB2 Posts: 16,802
    The currency markets haven't really responded either
  • FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 33,782
    edited April 11
    I hear that the former prime minister, who resigned after losing the EU referendum in 2016, had planned to begin promoting his long-awaited memoirs this month.

    However, he is said to have given his successor, Theresa May, a private understanding that he would not publish the autobiography until after Britain had left the European Union so as 'not to rock the boat'.
  • AlastairMeeksAlastairMeeks Posts: 24,125

    Is it not free money that the UK will hold EU elections now? The order has been given to extend to 31 October, so what's going to stop them?

    Parliament agreeing the deal next week, allowing a smooth exit in May or June.

    Well, you did ask...
    I'll take my chances on that one.
  • NickPalmerNickPalmer Posts: 12,054
    One constant in the last two years has been Mrs May's determination to hold on to office and persist in trying to get her way. It's unlikely that this will change or that the rules will enable Brexiteers to make it change, so betting against a leadership change this year seems a good punt at those odds.

    Indeed, I wonder if we'll actually see anything resolved before the summer recess. Tories won't want to do anything much till the locals, then nothing much till the Euros, and then we're just a few weeks from the break.

    But the Conservative conference in October should be interesting. What if we've formally withdrawn then and May makes a speech saying "I finally got us over the line, now let me finish the job"?
  • CD13CD13 Posts: 5,418
    Did Mrs May explain what the extension is for? Just asking for the UK population.
  • Richard_NabaviRichard_Nabavi Posts: 22,131

    Is it not free money that the UK will hold EU elections now? The order has been given to extend to 31 October, so what's going to stop them?

    Parliament agreeing the deal next week, allowing a smooth exit in May or June.

    Well, you did ask...
    I'll take my chances on that one.
    I don't think it's totally impossible, TBH. Unlikely, but maybe Labour are sincere.
  • Scott_PScott_P Posts: 44,557

    Parliament agreeing the deal next week, allowing a smooth exit in May or June.

    Well, you did ask...

    Are they not on holiday recess next week?
  • dyedwooliedyedwoolie Posts: 5,025
    CD13 said:

    Did Mrs May explain what the extension is for? Just asking for the UK population.

    She expects the ERG to have their Winston Smith moment and realise theyve always loved the WA
  • NickPalmerNickPalmer Posts: 12,054
    Some useful details on our semiu-detached status in this European source:

    https://www.euractiv.com/section/future-eu/news/eu27-is-now-free-to-hold-summits-without-the-uk/
  • rottenboroughrottenborough Posts: 20,668
    Scott_P said:
    I am looking forward to the public inquiry on all this.
  • CyclefreeCyclefree Posts: 12,978

    How did everyone vote in 2016 and what would they do in a further referendum? I’d love to know how many have changed their. I don’t. I’ll start

    Remain, then WA or remain if Remain vs no deal

    The decision in 2016 was very 50/50 for me. I am no fan of the EU. But now having seen the behaviour of the Brexiteers I am much more firmly in the Remain camp, despite my reservations about both the EU and whether long-term Britain fits comfortably in it.

    So if there were a referendum now I would vote Remain in a Remain/No Deal or Remain/May’s deal choice. If the choice was May’s Deal/No Deal I’d vote May’s Deal.

    I know three Leavers who have changed their minds, largely because of the utter pig’s ear the Brexit camp have made of the whole thing. That - and as one person put it - the fact that the EU has behaved like grown ups - contrary to expectations. Anecdotal I know.
  • BromBrom Posts: 1,350
    Still miles from a deal, still miles from a loser's vote, still miles from a no deal. Perhaps May should cancel summer recess to help focus MPs minds on making a decision.
  • Morris_DancerMorris_Dancer Posts: 48,591
    Miss Cyclefree, two people I know have both shifted somewhat. One was a soft leaver, the other a soft remainer, both now want us to just get out. Ironically, another person, who is a harder leaver, thinks May's deal is so bad we're better off remaining (if the only options are her deal or staying in).
  • MarqueeMarkMarqueeMark Posts: 24,353
    Scott_P said:

    Parliament agreeing the deal next week, allowing a smooth exit in May or June.

    Well, you did ask...

    Are they not on holiday recess next week?
    Then that will be the best time to ask, for a smooth exit.....
  • CyclefreeCyclefree Posts: 12,978

    Scott_P said:
    I am looking forward to the public inquiry on all this.
    I can’t think why anyone in the political class would agree to set one up. Everyone’s reputations would be utterly shredded.

    If it happens at all it will be when a whole new generation of politicians are in power and, by then, everyone will have made up their minds anyway.
  • TGOHFTGOHF Posts: 19,885
    Scott_P said:
    Wait until she finds out how much was spent on WW3 planning during the cold war..

    Stupid woman.

  • BromBrom Posts: 1,350
    TGOHF said:

    Scott_P said:
    Wait until she finds out how much was spent on WW3 planning during the cold war..

    Stupid woman.

    I have no idea who Pippa Crerar is or if she is a parody account, nor do I know where she gets her figures from but the idea of not planning for no deal is completely retarded, and it's worrying that anyone might agree with her 'point'.
  • Scott_PScott_P Posts: 44,557
    TGOHF said:

    Wait until she finds out how much was spent on WW3 planning during the cold war..

    We didn't vote for the Cold War
  • TGOHFTGOHF Posts: 19,885
    Cyclefree said:

    Scott_P said:
    I am looking forward to the public inquiry on all this.
    I can’t think why anyone in the political class would agree to set one up. Everyone’s reputations would be utterly shredded.

    If it happens at all it will be when a whole new generation of politicians are in power and, by then, everyone will have made up their minds anyway.
    Is Lord Hutton available to chair ?

    No doubt a public enquiry would find the civil service behaved impeccably and it was all the fault of the voters.

  • dyedwooliedyedwoolie Posts: 5,025
    TGOHF said:

    Scott_P said:
    Wait until she finds out how much was spent on WW3 planning during the cold war..

    Stupid woman.

    No contingency planning! Its evil
  • TGOHF said:

    Scott_P said:
    Wait until she finds out how much was spent on WW3 planning during the cold war..

    Stupid woman.

    Was the threat of WW3 self-imposed ?
  • TGOHFTGOHF Posts: 19,885

    TGOHF said:

    Scott_P said:
    Wait until she finds out how much was spent on WW3 planning during the cold war..

    Stupid woman.

    Was the threat of WW3 self-imposed ?
    Corbyn thinks so.
  • dyedwooliedyedwoolie Posts: 5,025
    Scott_P said:

    TGOHF said:

    Wait until she finds out how much was spent on WW3 planning during the cold war..

    We didn't vote for the Cold War
    Yes we did. We voted for governments that engaged in it. We could have voted in peaceniks
  • isamisam Posts: 25,352
    Cyclefree said:

    Scott_P said:
    I am looking forward to the public inquiry on all this.
    I can’t think why anyone in the political class would agree to set one up. Everyone’s reputations would be utterly shredded.

    If it happens at all it will be when a whole new generation of politicians are in power and, by then, everyone will have made up their minds anyway.
    MP’s have behaved like a serial adulterer, given one last chance by his wife, who starts chatting up the first woman he sees the moment he gets a minute away from the missus. You so wanted him to do the right thing, but you always knew he wouldn’t/couldn’t.
  • kinabalukinabalu Posts: 2,012

    How did everyone vote in 2016 and what would they do in a further referendum? I’d love to know how many have changed their. I don’t. I’ll start

    Remain, then WA or remain if Remain vs no deal

    I was Remain last time but am now REMAIN.
  • NigelbNigelb Posts: 11,037
    It's all gone a bit "Dinner for One"...
  • CyclefreeCyclefree Posts: 12,978

    Miss Cyclefree, two people I know have both shifted somewhat. One was a soft leaver, the other a soft remainer, both now want us to just get out. Ironically, another person, who is a harder leaver, thinks May's deal is so bad we're better off remaining (if the only options are her deal or staying in).

    Yes - I can see why some would think “let’s just get on with it”. Sometimes I am tempted by that thought. But I feel a bit like Wilson was reputed to have felt after the 1975 referendum: that voting to leave would mean that the wrong people would be in charge ie the loony left. I feel that now - the loony right (and probably also the loony left) would be in charge if we left. And I very much don’t want that for my children’s future or my country.
  • lolandollolandol Posts: 21
    For the record, I voted Remain last time and would vote Leave if there was another Referendum. I don't believe in being asked the same question until we get the right answer. We were told in no uncertain terms it was a one-off vote. I am sure that I will be outnumbered by those moving the other way or previous Leavers staying at home.
  • Tissue_PriceTissue_Price Posts: 8,501
    Cyclefree said:

    That - and as one person put it - the fact that the EU has behaved like grown ups - contrary to expectations. Anecdotal I know.

    The grown up thing to do would surely be to have one agreement covering everything: both departure and future relationship.
  • BromBrom Posts: 1,350
    kinabalu said:

    How did everyone vote in 2016 and what would they do in a further referendum? I’d love to know how many have changed their. I don’t. I’ll start

    Remain, then WA or remain if Remain vs no deal

    I was Remain last time but am now REMAIN.
    Though I am still leave along with my wife I'm pleased to say my parents are now leave. There seems to be a sentiment amongst a lot of reluctant remain pensioners about the importance of carrying out the vote which is in stark contrast to a lot of the younger me,me,me generation who never really accepted the 2016 result.
  • AlastairMeeksAlastairMeeks Posts: 24,125

    How did everyone vote in 2016 and what would they do in a further referendum? I’d love to know how many have changed their. I don’t. I’ll start

    Remain, then WA or remain if Remain vs no deal

    I voted Remain last time. If it's a vote between Remain and the withdrawal agreement I will vote for the withdrawal agreement. If it's a vote between Remain and No Deal I now think I will probably vote Remain in the end, though I might spoil my ballot paper.
  • WhisperingOracleWhisperingOracle Posts: 770
    edited April 11
    IanB2 said:

    The currency markets haven't really responded either

    Most politicians' intellects and brains haven't really responded to this either ; it's just stasis, which I quite strongly suspect might be followed by another delay up to March

    As many people have mentioned, the prospect now of Britain being almost eternally "in transition" is not impossible now ; in fact that ambivalence might quite accurately represent both the country's split and fatigue with the process.
  • TGOHFTGOHF Posts: 19,885

    Scott_P said:

    TGOHF said:

    Wait until she finds out how much was spent on WW3 planning during the cold war..

    We didn't vote for the Cold War
    Yes we did. We voted for governments that engaged in it. We could have voted in peaceniks
    Had we voted for Corbyn we could have saved billions on nuclear weapons and EU membership costs as we would have been members of the Warsaw pact.

  • NemtynakhtNemtynakht Posts: 1,412
    Cyclefree said:

    How did everyone vote in 2016 and what would they do in a further referendum? I’d love to know how many have changed their. I don’t. I’ll start

    Remain, then WA or remain if Remain vs no deal

    The decision in 2016 was very 50/50 for me. I am no fan of the EU. But now having seen the behaviour of the Brexiteers I am much more firmly in the Remain camp, despite my reservations about both the EU and whether long-term Britain fits comfortably in it.

    So if there were a referendum now I would vote Remain in a Remain/No Deal or Remain/May’s deal choice. If the choice was May’s Deal/No Deal I’d vote May’s Deal.

    I know three Leavers who have changed their minds, largely because of the utter pig’s ear the Brexit camp have made of the whole thing. That - and as one person put it - the fact that the EU has behaved like grown ups - contrary to expectations. Anecdotal I know.
    Most (normal) people no longer want to talk about Brexit. As I’ve got a very Remain centric group of friends and I live on the edge of Bristol it is hard to gauge the opinions of Leavers expect through Facebook or through my job.
  • Morris_DancerMorris_Dancer Posts: 48,591
    Miss Cyclefree, a counterpoint, assuming your underlying suggestion is correct (which it may not be), is that we can vote for a new set of MPs. We can't vote for a new EU.

    Not to mention the damage that has already been caused and will be even worse if we end up staying in having voted to leave.

    I'd add that if we stay, that'll shatter the Conservatives and improve Corbyn's chances of winning the subsequent election massively. And whilst there are some daft sods in the Conservatives, the worst of them are the backbenchers, whereas Labour's lunatics are squatting on the front bench.
  • dyedwooliedyedwoolie Posts: 5,025
    kinabalu said:

    How did everyone vote in 2016 and what would they do in a further referendum? I’d love to know how many have changed their. I don’t. I’ll start

    Remain, then WA or remain if Remain vs no deal

    I was Remain last time but am now REMAIN.
    Leave in 2016, fairly reluctantly but through dislike of the beaurocracy and I think the project is doomed anyway
    I wouldn't vote in another referendum. Well I would but spoil my ballot.
  • BromBrom Posts: 1,350
    Cyclefree said:

    Miss Cyclefree, two people I know have both shifted somewhat. One was a soft leaver, the other a soft remainer, both now want us to just get out. Ironically, another person, who is a harder leaver, thinks May's deal is so bad we're better off remaining (if the only options are her deal or staying in).

    Yes - I can see why some would think “let’s just get on with it”. Sometimes I am tempted by that thought. But I feel a bit like Wilson was reputed to have felt after the 1975 referendum: that voting to leave would mean that the wrong people would be in charge ie the loony left. I feel that now - the loony right (and probably also the loony left) would be in charge if we left. And I very much don’t want that for my children’s future or my country.
    I see it the other way round, if we don't leave chances are the Tory right will be emboldened and we'll end up with Boris PM, if we do come to some kind of agreement they will get any 'blame' for Brexit and no doubt someone like Hunt or Javid will lead the party towards the centre ground in an attempt to mend the country.
  • Scott_P said:

    TGOHF said:

    Wait until she finds out how much was spent on WW3 planning during the cold war..

    We didn't vote for the Cold War
    Yes we did. We voted for governments that engaged in it. We could have voted in peaceniks
    That wouldn't have stopped its leading edge in the USA and USSR.
  • TOPPINGTOPPING Posts: 17,404

    Totally O/T...for fans of the good wife / good fight, the new season has Michael Sheen play a crazier individual than colin sweeney.

    When/where is it due to be screened?
  • FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 33,782
    edited April 11
    Scott_P said:
    I notice glenn greenwald is now a regular on fox news over the "russian hoax". I presume he is also now not popular with guardianistas.
  • glwglw Posts: 4,889
    TGOHF said:

    Scott_P said:
    Wait until she finds out how much was spent on WW3 planning during the cold war..

    Stupid woman.

    It is an extremely stupid argument. This government and all other sensible governments spend enormous sums of money preparing for all sorts of risks that they hope never happen.
  • not_on_firenot_on_fire Posts: 2,710
    Remain then, Remain now.
  • dyedwooliedyedwoolie Posts: 5,025
    TGOHF said:

    Scott_P said:

    TGOHF said:

    Wait until she finds out how much was spent on WW3 planning during the cold war..

    We didn't vote for the Cold War
    Yes we did. We voted for governments that engaged in it. We could have voted in peaceniks
    Had we voted for Corbyn we could have saved billions on nuclear weapons and EU membership costs as we would have been members of the Warsaw pact.

    Da, comrade
  • WhisperingOracleWhisperingOracle Posts: 770
    edited April 11
    HYUFD said:
    If I was a Tory, I'd be as worried by that -10 as by that other -11 in the poll a couple of weeks back.
  • BromBrom Posts: 1,350
    There would be a lot of ballot spoiling going on, it would be a tough decision. Of course I support the WA and of course I want to leave, but would I have any expectation that another leave victory would be adhered to? Definitely not. This is a strong reason why a people's vote would be nonsense, but as we know parliament likes nonsense.
  • dyedwooliedyedwoolie Posts: 5,025

    Scott_P said:

    TGOHF said:

    Wait until she finds out how much was spent on WW3 planning during the cold war..

    We didn't vote for the Cold War
    Yes we did. We voted for governments that engaged in it. We could have voted in peaceniks
    That wouldn't have stopped its leading edge in the USA and USSR.
    It was a good excuse to funnel money into secret projects anyway
  • NickPalmerNickPalmer Posts: 12,054
    edited April 11
    I've now dug out the BMG polling approach. As I rather suspected, there was a somewhat leading question involved, but not as much as some polls. It appears that they first asked a standard question, and then a question with the new parties "hypothetically" asked. They claim there is "little chance" that this nudged respondents - I think that understates it a bit.

    "Respondents were asked: “If a hypothetical General Election were held today with the following parties available to vote for, who would you vote for?”, with options for The Brexit Party and Change UK included as additions.

    The poll shows The Brexit Party attracting the support of 6%, whilst Change UK receives 8%. The poll suggests that both of the major parties are set to lose some support. However, the results indicate that it is the Conservative Party who would be most affected, with a potential drop of 6 percentage points, compared to the three point drop for Labour. That said, given that awareness of both parties is still fairly low, plus the usual caveats for the margin of error, readers should treat the changes with a degree of caution.

    Unlike other polls examining support for Change UK and The Brexit Party, the question did not include a preamble explaining who each of the parties were or information on each of their respective policy agendas. Our poll therefore relies exclusively on respondents “top-of-mind” awareness each of the new political outfits, with little chance that any respondents stating they would vote for them as a result of being primed by the wording of the questions or previous questions."

    https://www.bmgresearch.co.uk/bmgs-westminster-voting-intention-results-april-2019/
  • Ishmael_ZIshmael_Z Posts: 6,587

    Scott_P said:

    TGOHF said:

    Wait until she finds out how much was spent on WW3 planning during the cold war..

    We didn't vote for the Cold War
    Yes we did. We voted for governments that engaged in it. We could have voted in peaceniks
    I don't think any major party ever ran on a peacenik manifesto.

    The thought experiment of a referendum on completely denuclearizing in the 1960s is a good argument against referendums.
  • "daily life protocols" ? Has he been stinking the place out ?
  • anothernickanothernick Posts: 2,405

    IanB2 said:

    The currency markets haven't really responded either

    Most politicians' intellects and brains haven't really responded to this either ; it's just stasis, which I quite strongly suspect might be followed by another delay up to March

    As many people have mentioned, the prospect now of Britain being almost eternally "in transition" is not impossible now ; in fact that ambivalence might quite accurately represent both the country's split and fatigue with the process.
    I agree. I can see the "transitional period" continuing until a government with a large majority is elected with a mandate to move forward, and the likely move is back to full membership. There is no prospect of a government committed to no deal being elected IMO, the political forces that supported Brexit are fragmenting and weakening as their inability to deliver becomes clearer.
  • NemtynakhtNemtynakht Posts: 1,412
    Brom said:

    kinabalu said:

    How did everyone vote in 2016 and what would they do in a further referendum? I’d love to know how many have changed their. I don’t. I’ll start

    Remain, then WA or remain if Remain vs no deal

    I was Remain last time but am now REMAIN.
    Though I am still leave along with my wife I'm pleased to say my parents are now leave. There seems to be a sentiment amongst a lot of reluctant remain pensioners about the importance of carrying out the vote which is in stark contrast to a lot of the younger me,me,me generation who never really accepted the 2016 result.
    An interesting point. A friend has recommended the book Selfie by Will Storr. I’ve not got around to reading it yet but I believe he puts forward the idea that we are becoming more perfectionist yet unable to achieve our preferred outcome. I would stress this as a motivation rather than me me me being a negative, young people are just not willing to put their name to something they don’t agree with, and this greater accountability affects politics too.
  • FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 33,782
    I presume all those right on celebs who used to back assange will be shortly protesting outside the local police station...no?
  • HYUFDHYUFD Posts: 52,143

    HYUFD said:
    If I was a Tory, I'd be as worried by that -10 as by that other -11 in the poll a couple of weeks back.
    Yet with Labour also down 9% on GE17 it would still be a hung parliament
  • dyedwooliedyedwoolie Posts: 5,025
    He will be fine. He has dirt on people trump wants dirt on.
  • AlastairMeeksAlastairMeeks Posts: 24,125
    There will be a few prominent people sweating a little about what might be discussed in the interview rooms with Mr Assange.
  • RecidivistRecidivist Posts: 3,655
    TGOHF said:

    Scott_P said:
    Wait until she finds out how much was spent on WW3 planning during the cold war..

    Stupid woman.

    We are not planning a war.
  • Ishmael_ZIshmael_Z Posts: 6,587
    edited April 11
    Brom said:

    There would be a lot of ballot spoiling going on, it would be a tough decision. Of course I support the WA and of course I want to leave, but would I have any expectation that another leave victory would be adhered to? Definitely not. This is a strong reason why a people's vote would be nonsense, but as we know parliament likes nonsense.

    As I said on the previous thread, once you have a clear and reducible-to-writing form of Leave you can exclude the possibility of a Leave result being stolen by the politicians. You put the wording in a schedule to the Act and you provide that if Leave wins then on the *very next day* the PM will sign up to the deal in the schedule. Only a furthe Act can reverse that , and there isn't time for another Act to pass.
  • dyedwooliedyedwoolie Posts: 5,025

    There will be a few prominent people sweating a little about what might be discussed in the interview rooms with Mr Assange.

    Trump will give him a pardon in return for the goodies
  • Danny565Danny565 Posts: 7,657
    Brom said:

    kinabalu said:

    How did everyone vote in 2016 and what would they do in a further referendum? I’d love to know how many have changed their. I don’t. I’ll start

    Remain, then WA or remain if Remain vs no deal

    I was Remain last time but am now REMAIN.
    Though I am still leave along with my wife I'm pleased to say my parents are now leave. There seems to be a sentiment amongst a lot of reluctant remain pensioners about the importance of carrying out the vote which is in stark contrast to a lot of the younger me,me,me generation who never really accepted the 2016 result.
    Huh, my experience is the opposite - the only two Leave voters I can remember who said they've changed their minds were older women who said they felt guilty about messing up their kids/grandkids' futures.

    Anyway, I'd vote Remain, like last time, but I'd be happy enough if May's deal won since atleast it would be an end to it and would shut up everyone but the most diehard.

    God forbid if "No Deal" is an option on the ballot paper.
  • Ishmael_ZIshmael_Z Posts: 6,587

    "daily life protocols" ? Has he been stinking the place out ?
    And using other peoples' milk from the fridge.
  • AlastairMeeksAlastairMeeks Posts: 24,125

    There will be a few prominent people sweating a little about what might be discussed in the interview rooms with Mr Assange.

    Trump will give him a pardon in return for the goodies
    Donald Trump is not the only person who will have damp palms.
  • TheWhiteRabbitTheWhiteRabbit Posts: 9,275

    HYUFD said:
    If I was a Tory, I'd be as worried by that -10 as by that other -11 in the poll a couple of weeks back.
    It's not great, but neither CHUK nor BREX are in a position to field the requisite number of candidates.
  • FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 33,782
    Ishmael_Z said:

    "daily life protocols" ? Has he been stinking the place out ?
    And using other peoples' milk from the fridge.
    I reckon it was hogging the internet bandwidth.
  • TheuniondivvieTheuniondivvie Posts: 13,977
    What are daily life protocols, not leaving the bog seat up and taking your turn to do the dishes?
  • dyedwooliedyedwoolie Posts: 5,025

    There will be a few prominent people sweating a little about what might be discussed in the interview rooms with Mr Assange.

    Trump will give him a pardon in return for the goodies
    Donald Trump is not the only person who will have damp palms.
    No but he will give the pardon and come into possession of the palm sweating goodness on others
  • RecidivistRecidivist Posts: 3,655
    HYUFD said:

    HYUFD said:
    If I was a Tory, I'd be as worried by that -10 as by that other -11 in the poll a couple of weeks back.
    Yet with Labour also down 9% on GE17 it would still be a hung parliament
    Deep joy.
  • glwglw Posts: 4,889

    What are daily life protocols, not leaving the bog seat up and taking your turn to do the dishes?
    He wasn't properly looking after his cat.
  • CarlottaVanceCarlottaVance Posts: 33,283
    Pas hereux:

    Cette valse de plus en plus incompréhensible des dates montre que le Royaume-Uni a réussi l’exploit d’exporter ses batailles byzantines internes à Bruxelles. Car ce sommet a fait voler en éclat le beau front uni des Européens qui tenait vaille que vaille depuis trois ans, à l’image d’un couple franco-allemand décidément de plus en plus fictionnel.

    https://www.liberation.fr/planete/2019/04/11/brexit-les-europeens-accordent-un-nouveau-report-jusqu-au-31-octobre_1720646?xtor=rss-450&utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Twitter&utm_campaign=dlvr.it
  • Ishmael_Z said:

    "daily life protocols" ? Has he been stinking the place out ?
    And using other peoples' milk from the fridge.
    I reckon it was hogging the internet bandwidth.
    He ordered boxed wine and Hawaiian pizzas every Saturday night.
  • dyedwooliedyedwoolie Posts: 5,025

    What are daily life protocols, not leaving the bog seat up and taking your turn to do the dishes?
    Didn't take the bins out because of some ludicrous hitman
  • CyclefreeCyclefree Posts: 12,978
    edited April 11

    Miss Cyclefree, a counterpoint, assuming your underlying suggestion is correct (which it may not be), is that we can vote for a new set of MPs. We can't vote for a new EU.

    Not to mention the damage that has already been caused and will be even worse if we end up staying in having voted to leave.

    I'd add that if we stay, that'll shatter the Conservatives and improve Corbyn's chances of winning the subsequent election massively. And whilst there are some daft sods in the Conservatives, the worst of them are the backbenchers, whereas Labour's lunatics are squatting on the front bench.

    There aren’t many good options now. I don’t care if the Tories are shattered. Labour are lunatics, I agree, but if they are in power and we are still in the EU, their ability to carry out their lunacy will be limited to some extent.

    I have to say that I am beginning to rethink my whole approach to the EU. I wonder whether it might not be better to get more involved. Bear with me: some say that an EU army would be a terrible thing. But would it be such a bad thing for the EU to take European defence more seriously? After all the US is retreating from Europe and Putin is being aggressive so maybe the old verities are no longer true and we need some fresh thinking. Ditto re the euro and re taxation of large global companies. And, maybe, rather than retreating into national nativist and nastily illiberal parties we should look to see how we can develop a much more liberal Europe-wide demos.

    I don’t know and my thinking on this has barely started and if I have time (I have a new project starting soon) I may do some thread headers on this. But as I’ve banged on about this before, we - and the EU - need a proper strategy about how we interact with each other. The tragedy of Brexit is that none of that fresh thinking about what such a British/ European strategy should be has been done. It has been a colossal wasted opportunity.
  • TheuniondivvieTheuniondivvie Posts: 13,977

    TGOHF said:

    Scott_P said:
    Wait until she finds out how much was spent on WW3 planning during the cold war..

    Stupid woman.

    We are not planning a war.
    Well, not all of us.

    'Nigel Farage has said he would, “don khaki, pick up a rifle and head for the front lines” if Theresa May fails to deliver Brexit in the fashion he wants.'
  • kinabalukinabalu Posts: 2,012
    It would appear to me that this parliament, under either Mrs May or any feasible replacement PM, is resolved to block Deal, No Deal, and REF2. That leaves nothing. A different parliament (via a GE) is therefore required. But (Tory) MPs are blocking that too. So where does this leave us? Utterly stuck. Can't even see an exit, let alone stumble towards it. It's an unpleasant, claustrophobic situation. It doesn't feel at all like taking back control.
  • CarlottaVanceCarlottaVance Posts: 33,283
    edited April 11
    Met statement:

    The MPS had a duty to execute the warrant, on behalf of Westminster Magistrates' Court, and was invited into the embassy by the Ambassador, following the Ecuadorian government's withdrawal of asylum.

  • Richard_NabaviRichard_Nabavi Posts: 22,131
    edited April 11
    I have an outstanding bet dating from 2010 (!) at Paddy Power: £15.70 @ 2.1 that Julian Assange will be extradited.
  • FrancisUrquhartFrancisUrquhart Posts: 33,782
    edited April 11

    Ishmael_Z said:

    "daily life protocols" ? Has he been stinking the place out ?
    And using other peoples' milk from the fridge.
    I reckon it was hogging the internet bandwidth.
    He ordered boxed wine and Hawaiian pizzas every Saturday night.
    Or played OK Computer on loop without headphones while he was working.
  • TheuniondivvieTheuniondivvie Posts: 13,977

    What are daily life protocols, not leaving the bog seat up and taking your turn to do the dishes?
    Didn't take the bins out because of some ludicrous hitman
    Aye, we've all used that one.
This discussion has been closed.