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SystemSystem Posts: 5,841
edited June 6 in General

imagepoliticalbetting.com » Blog Archive » The latest PB cartoon

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  • PulpstarPulpstar Posts: 44,186
    Sinn Fein Amhain
  • TGOHFTGOHF Posts: 17,768
    2nd - like Remain.
  • AlanbrookeAlanbrooke Posts: 16,789
    why's Eamon de Valera standing on a cliff ?

  • Morris_DancerMorris_Dancer Posts: 43,043
    Fourth, like Claudius.
  • AlastairMeeksAlastairMeeks Posts: 19,759
    The waves were parted by Moses, not Jacob.
  • NigelbNigelb Posts: 5,700
    edited June 6

    why's Eamon de Valera standing on a cliff ?

    I thought it was JRM and a mini-Mogg.


    On the snout of a baleen whale.
  • TOPPINGTOPPING Posts: 13,198
    Bad portrayal. JRM's suits look like they were handed down to him by an uncle who weighed more than him or who worked out. The suits in the cartoon are too well-fitting.
  • TOPPINGTOPPING Posts: 13,198
    edited June 6

    why's Eamon de Valera standing on a cliff ?

    Waving at Galway, opposite.
  • AlanbrookeAlanbrooke Posts: 16,789
    Pulpstar said:

    Sinn Fein Amhain

    Votail Mafia
  • TGOHFTGOHF Posts: 17,768
    TOPPING said:

    why's Eamon de Valera standing on a cliff ?

    Waving at Galway, opposite.
    Waving goodbye to the ROI being net recipients from the EU budget (heart of stone etc).
  • SandyRentoolSandyRentool Posts: 6,201
    FPT: Sunil - The Stalyvegas - Stockport service now runs on a Saturday morning and does a return trip
  • Sunil_PrasannanSunil_Prasannan Posts: 26,335

    FPT: Sunil - The Stalyvegas - Stockport service now runs on a Saturday morning and does a return trip

    It does? Mr Maund needs to update PSUL!

    http://www.psul4all.free-online.co.uk/2018.htm
  • AnneJGPAnneJGP Posts: 2,206
    Can I be first to say I don't get it (the cartoon)?

    Good afternoon, everybody.
  • tlg86tlg86 Posts: 8,536
    AnneJGP said:

    Can I be first to say I don't get it (the cartoon)?

    Good afternoon, everybody.

    The Sun already used the lightbulb, but I guess it's along those lines.
  • logical_songlogical_song Posts: 5,846
    Scott_P said:
    Everything is under control.
    Nothing can go wrong,
    go wrong,
    go wrong....
  • AlastairMeeksAlastairMeeks Posts: 19,759
    AnneJGP said:

    Can I be first to say I don't get it (the cartoon)?

    Good afternoon, everybody.

    It's a homage to this one from the Second World War:

    https://archive.cartoons.ac.uk/GetMultimedia.ashx?db=Catalog&type=default&fname=LSE2791.jpg
  • Philip_ThompsonPhilip_Thompson Posts: 13,300
    Scott_P said:
    Terrible example given that there's already options for non-members to have access. More like:

    "I want to have full access to a pizza, but I don't want to eat in the restaurant"

    - "How are you going to get a pizza?"

    "I'll buy a takeaway"

    *Eats pizza*
  • FeersumEnjineeyaFeersumEnjineeya Posts: 1,244
    edited June 6

    AnneJGP said:

    Can I be first to say I don't get it (the cartoon)?

    Good afternoon, everybody.

    It's a homage to this one from the Second World War:

    https://archive.cartoons.ac.uk/GetMultimedia.ashx?db=Catalog&type=default&fname=LSE2791.jpg
    Yes, I got that, but I still don't really get the cartoon either. Why JRM and what looks like a mini-JRM? Without whose help are they doing what? Who is the USA meant to represent here?
  • SandyRentoolSandyRentool Posts: 6,201

    AnneJGP said:

    Can I be first to say I don't get it (the cartoon)?

    Good afternoon, everybody.

    It's a homage to this one from the Second World War:

    https://archive.cartoons.ac.uk/GetMultimedia.ashx?db=Catalog&type=default&fname=LSE2791.jpg
    Yes, I got that, but I still don't really get the cartoon either. Why JRM and what looks like a mini-JRM? Without whose help are they doing what? Who is the USA meant to represent here?
    If you haven't seen the photo of Mogg and mini-Mogg outside the BBC last week, then this is the inspiration..
  • Scott_PScott_P Posts: 36,412

    If you haven't seen the photo of Mogg and mini-Mogg outside the BBC last week, then this is the inspiration..

    A cartoon so good, they explained it twice...
  • TheScreamingEaglesTheScreamingEagles Posts: 65,544

    AnneJGP said:

    Can I be first to say I don't get it (the cartoon)?

    Good afternoon, everybody.

    It's a homage to this one from the Second World War:

    https://archive.cartoons.ac.uk/GetMultimedia.ashx?db=Catalog&type=default&fname=LSE2791.jpg
    Yes, I got that, but I still don't really get the cartoon either. Why JRM and what looks like a mini-JRM? Without whose help are they doing what? Who is the USA meant to represent here?
    This was a recent pic of JRM and sprog.

    image
  • MaxPBMaxPB Posts: 14,636
    edited June 6
    In lighter discussion, the new trailer for the Spiderverse is out. It is "holy balls this is awesome" level of good.



    Might be the best movie of the year after Infinity War.
  • MortimerMortimer Posts: 9,868
    What power of summons do the committees have? They seem much more active now than say 15 years ago....
  • AnneJGPAnneJGP Posts: 2,206

    AnneJGP said:

    Can I be first to say I don't get it (the cartoon)?

    Good afternoon, everybody.

    It's a homage to this one from the Second World War:

    https://archive.cartoons.ac.uk/GetMultimedia.ashx?db=Catalog&type=default&fname=LSE2791.jpg
    Thank you, and to all the others too.
  • Richard_NabaviRichard_Nabavi Posts: 18,285
    It's ironic that many of those who most vociferously say that Theresa May should stand up to über-Brexiteer bullies in her party are precisely those who voted to deny her the parliamentary numbers to do so.
  • FeersumEnjineeyaFeersumEnjineeya Posts: 1,244

    AnneJGP said:

    Can I be first to say I don't get it (the cartoon)?

    Good afternoon, everybody.

    It's a homage to this one from the Second World War:

    https://archive.cartoons.ac.uk/GetMultimedia.ashx?db=Catalog&type=default&fname=LSE2791.jpg
    Yes, I got that, but I still don't really get the cartoon either. Why JRM and what looks like a mini-JRM? Without whose help are they doing what? Who is the USA meant to represent here?
    This was a recent pic of JRM and sprog.

    image
    Ah, thanks. I'm still not sure I get it though. The original cartoon expressed Britain's determination to fight on, alone if need be, despite apparently wavering allies. Who are JRM's wavering allies supposed to be? TMay and co.? And what does the inclusion of his sprog add?
  • surbysurby Posts: 469

    It's ironic that many of those who most vociferously say that Theresa May should stand up to über-Brexiteer bullies in her party are precisely those who voted to deny her the parliamentary numbers to do so.

    So the people are at fault ?
  • surbysurby Posts: 469

    AnneJGP said:

    Can I be first to say I don't get it (the cartoon)?

    Good afternoon, everybody.

    It's a homage to this one from the Second World War:

    https://archive.cartoons.ac.uk/GetMultimedia.ashx?db=Catalog&type=default&fname=LSE2791.jpg
    Yes, I got that, but I still don't really get the cartoon either. Why JRM and what looks like a mini-JRM? Without whose help are they doing what? Who is the USA meant to represent here?
    This was a recent pic of JRM and sprog.

    image
    Nowhere in the Ronaldo and Ronaldo Jr class. The suit, the shirt, the tie - all would have matched.
  • Richard_NabaviRichard_Nabavi Posts: 18,285
    edited June 6
    surby said:

    It's ironic that many of those who most vociferously say that Theresa May should stand up to über-Brexiteer bullies in her party are precisely those who voted to deny her the parliamentary numbers to do so.

    So the people are at fault ?
    Yes, of course, they gave her a near-impossible task and then they made it even more impossible. Votes have consequences, you know.
  • Philip_ThompsonPhilip_Thompson Posts: 13,300
    surby said:

    It's ironic that many of those who most vociferously say that Theresa May should stand up to über-Brexiteer bullies in her party are precisely those who voted to deny her the parliamentary numbers to do so.

    So the people are at fault ?
    Yes. The people have the government they deserve.
  • JosiasJessopJosiasJessop Posts: 19,885
    Off-topic:

    On Heathrow. Enough already. HR3 is not my favoured option, but we need something, and something ASAP. Just get the f***ing diggers in and start work.
  • AlastairMeeksAlastairMeeks Posts: 19,759

    It's ironic that many of those who most vociferously say that Theresa May should stand up to über-Brexiteer bullies in her party are precisely those who voted to deny her the parliamentary numbers to do so.

    Help will always be given at Hogwarts to those who ask for it.

    Theresa May has not asked for it, though there she has ample reinforcements available to her if she does.
  • Morris_DancerMorris_Dancer Posts: 43,043
    Mr. Max, hmm. There was a recent-ish Spiderman videogame that had four alternative universe Spidermen in it. That looks kind of similar.

    Also, Spiderman must be the most rebooted/origin storified of all the superheroes. But the trailer does look good.
  • Scott_PScott_P Posts: 36,412

    Yes, of course, they gave her a near-impossible task and then they made it even more impossible.

    Maybe if the vote had not been described as "crushing the saboteurs", some more of them might have voted for her
  • Richard_NabaviRichard_Nabavi Posts: 18,285
    edited June 6
    Scott_P said:

    Yes, of course, they gave her a near-impossible task and then they made it even more impossible.

    Maybe if the vote had not been described as "crushing the saboteurs", some more of them might have voted for her
    Possibly, although anyone whose vote is influenced by a Daily Mail headline deserves everything they get.
  • surbysurby Posts: 469

    surby said:

    It's ironic that many of those who most vociferously say that Theresa May should stand up to über-Brexiteer bullies in her party are precisely those who voted to deny her the parliamentary numbers to do so.

    So the people are at fault ?
    Yes, of course, they gave her a near-impossible task and then they made it even more impossible. Votes have consequences, you know.
    If given the opportunity, the people could change their collective mind - now that they know what the original "wish" actually means.
  • Scott_PScott_P Posts: 36,412

    Possibly, although anyone whose vote is influenced by a Daily Mail headline deserves everything they get.

    How about those whose vote was influenced by the side of a bus?
  • Richard_NabaviRichard_Nabavi Posts: 18,285
    surby said:

    surby said:

    It's ironic that many of those who most vociferously say that Theresa May should stand up to über-Brexiteer bullies in her party are precisely those who voted to deny her the parliamentary numbers to do so.

    So the people are at fault ?
    Yes, of course, they gave her a near-impossible task and then they made it even more impossible. Votes have consequences, you know.
    If given the opportunity, the people could change their collective mind - now that they know what the original "wish" actually means.
    Unfortunately the option of going back to Cameron and Osborne, and remaining in the EU under the excellent terms negotiated, is no longer available. Hell, even the option of going back to Ed Miliband has vanished. We are where we are.
  • Tissue_PriceTissue_Price Posts: 7,556
    edited June 6
    I note Sajid Javid is 10/1 Next Con Leader with Betfair Sportsbook (and also Betfred). This won't last. Especially now I've told you lot.

    I also note he's 14/1 Next PM with William Hill. Ditto.
  • Richard_NabaviRichard_Nabavi Posts: 18,285
    Scott_P said:

    Possibly, although anyone whose vote is influenced by a Daily Mail headline deserves everything they get.

    How about those whose vote was influenced by the side of a bus?
    I think that comes under the heading 'venal sin'.
  • PClippPClipp Posts: 1,543

    surby said:

    surby said:

    It's ironic that many of those who most vociferously say that Theresa May should stand up to über-Brexiteer bullies in her party are precisely those who voted to deny her the parliamentary numbers to do so.

    So the people are at fault ?
    Yes, of course, they gave her a near-impossible task and then they made it even more impossible. Votes have consequences, you know.
    If given the opportunity, the people could change their collective mind - now that they know what the original "wish" actually means.
    Unfortunately the option of going back to Cameron and Osborne, and remaining in the EU under the excellent terms negotiated, is no longer available. Hell, even the option of going back to Ed Miliband has vanished. We are where we are.
    What are these "excellent terms negotiated", Mr Navabi? I think we should be told.
  • TOPPINGTOPPING Posts: 13,198
    .

    surby said:

    It's ironic that many of those who most vociferously say that Theresa May should stand up to über-Brexiteer bullies in her party are precisely those who voted to deny her the parliamentary numbers to do so.

    So the people are at fault ?
    Yes, of course, they gave her a near-impossible task and then they made it even more impossible. Votes have consequences, you know.
    "...worst form of government..." and all...
  • Richard_NabaviRichard_Nabavi Posts: 18,285
    PClipp said:

    surby said:

    surby said:

    It's ironic that many of those who most vociferously say that Theresa May should stand up to über-Brexiteer bullies in her party are precisely those who voted to deny her the parliamentary numbers to do so.

    So the people are at fault ?
    Yes, of course, they gave her a near-impossible task and then they made it even more impossible. Votes have consequences, you know.
    If given the opportunity, the people could change their collective mind - now that they know what the original "wish" actually means.
    Unfortunately the option of going back to Cameron and Osborne, and remaining in the EU under the excellent terms negotiated, is no longer available. Hell, even the option of going back to Ed Miliband has vanished. We are where we are.
    What are these "excellent terms negotiated", Mr Navabi? I think we should be told.
    We were.
  • surbysurby Posts: 469
  • TheScreamingEaglesTheScreamingEagles Posts: 65,544
    Scott_P said:
    David Davis is all fart and no follow through.

    He threatened to resign if Damian Green was fired for porn on his laptop.
  • PClippPClipp Posts: 1,543
    Can they arrest him? That would be good. Taking back control, and all that!
  • Tissue_PriceTissue_Price Posts: 7,556

    Scott_P said:

    Possibly, although anyone whose vote is influenced by a Daily Mail headline deserves everything they get.

    How about those whose vote was influenced by the side of a bus?
    I think that comes under the heading 'venal sin'.
    omnibus creditum.
  • AlanbrookeAlanbrooke Posts: 16,789
    edited June 6
    Dumme Deutsche

    the germans have decided to introduce a PMQ style session in the Bundestag, I hope Ask Angie is better than our charade

    http://www.faz.net/aktuell/politik/inland/abgeordnete-fragen-merkel-eine-revolution-ohne-revolution-15625677.html

  • Richard_NabaviRichard_Nabavi Posts: 18,285
    edited June 6
    PClipp said:

    Can they arrest him? That would be good. Taking back control, and all that!
    Yes, according to the Font Of All Knowledge:

    In the United Kingdom, it has been alleged that arresting a member of Parliament in the course of carrying out his duties may constitute contempt of Parliament,[16] although immunity from criminal arrest was removed by the Parliamentary Privilege Acts of the 18th century.

    It is further contempt to bribe or attempt to bribe any member (and for any member to accept or solicit a bribe), to disrupt the sittings of the House or a committee—wherever it is sitting, to refuse to appear before a committee to testify, to refuse to answer any question put by a committee, to lie to a committee or to refuse to swear an oath when testifying, or to otherwise obstruct the business of the House.

    MPs accused of Contempt of Parliament may be suspended or expelled.[17] They may also be committed to the clock tower of the Palace of Westminster,[17] although this practice has not been used since Charles Bradlaugh was detained in 1880. Strangers (those who are not members of the House) may be committed to prison during the life of the Parliament. The House of Lords has the power to fine as well as to order imprisonment for a term of years.
  • SouthamObserverSouthamObserver Posts: 26,307
    surby said:

    It's ironic that many of those who most vociferously say that Theresa May should stand up to über-Brexiteer bullies in her party are precisely those who voted to deny her the parliamentary numbers to do so.

    So the people are at fault ?

    Of course!! It is inconceivable that it could be the fault of the Conservative party.

  • AlanbrookeAlanbrooke Posts: 16,789

    PClipp said:

    Can they arrest him? That would be good. Taking back control, and all that!
    Yes, according to the Font Of All Knowledge:

    In the United Kingdom, it has been alleged that arresting a member of Parliament in the course of carrying out his duties may constitute contempt of Parliament,[16] although immunity from criminal arrest was removed by the Parliamentary Privilege Acts of the 18th century.

    It is further contempt to bribe or attempt to bribe any member (and for any member to accept or solicit a bribe), to disrupt the sittings of the House or a committee—wherever it is sitting, to refuse to appear before a committee to testify, to refuse to answer any question put by a committee, to lie to a committee or to refuse to swear an oath when testifying, or to otherwise obstruct the business of the House.

    MPs accused of Contempt of Parliament may be suspended or expelled.[17] They may also be committed to the clock tower of the Palace of Westminster,[17] although this practice has not been used since Charles Bradlaugh was detained in 1880. Strangers (those who are not members of the House) may be committed to prison during the life of the Parliament. The House of Lords has the power to fine as well as to order imprisonment for a term of years.
    You still have to question the wisdom of asking him to appear, he will treat them with contempt and have a large and favourable audience urging him to do so. I can only see the committee undermining its own credibility.
  • Pro_RataPro_Rata Posts: 759

    It's ironic that many of those who most vociferously say that Theresa May should stand up to über-Brexiteer bullies in her party are precisely those who voted to deny her the parliamentary numbers to do so.

    My door, for one, was ajar to the idea of voting Tory.

    If she had given a hint of understanding the public services challenge, other than very obliquely via the dementia tax. I had spent three months up to GE17 regularly visiting a number of hospitals and the travails were pretty fresh in my mind. May started so well on the doorstep of no 10. We saw none of that.

    If she had given a hint at how she was going to play Brexit beyond a policy that seemed to pander to the hard line of her party, with no hint as to the underlying game (Saboteur crushing or no). She needed help for Brexit? OK, but from whom and why I never knew.

    My door is still ajar to voting Tory ata some point in the battle against Corbyn, despite their being an utter shower, but it is going to take something a teency bit different.
  • Richard_NabaviRichard_Nabavi Posts: 18,285

    You still have to question the wisdom of asking him to appear, he will treat them with contempt and have a large and favourable audience urging him to do so. I can only see the committee undermining its own credibility.

    Unfortunately, Select Committees on controversial issues have become excuses for MP grandstanding, which is a great pity since more obscure Select Committees do excellent work. It would be better if they weren't televised.
  • AndyJSAndyJS Posts: 22,081
    "Police fear career and lives could be ruined if they pursue moped gangs"

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2018/06/05/police-fear-career-lives-could-ruined-pursue-moped-gangs/
  • AlanbrookeAlanbrooke Posts: 16,789

    surby said:

    It's ironic that many of those who most vociferously say that Theresa May should stand up to über-Brexiteer bullies in her party are precisely those who voted to deny her the parliamentary numbers to do so.

    So the people are at fault ?

    Of course!! It is inconceivable that it could be the fault of the Conservative party.

    haven't you got a concert to organise ?
  • Tissue_PriceTissue_Price Posts: 7,556
    Quite a major-looking fire in Knightsbridge - the Mandarin Oriental Hotel apparently.
  • AlanbrookeAlanbrooke Posts: 16,789

    You still have to question the wisdom of asking him to appear, he will treat them with contempt and have a large and favourable audience urging him to do so. I can only see the committee undermining its own credibility.

    Unfortunately, Select Committees on controversial issues have become excuses for MP grandstanding, which is a great pity since more obscure Select Committees do excellent work. It would be better if they weren't televised.
    I'm afraid that's true, but MPs just cant help themselves.
  • Richard_NabaviRichard_Nabavi Posts: 18,285
    Pro_Rata said:

    It's ironic that many of those who most vociferously say that Theresa May should stand up to über-Brexiteer bullies in her party are precisely those who voted to deny her the parliamentary numbers to do so.

    My door, for one, was ajar to the idea of voting Tory.

    If she had given a hint of understanding the public services challenge, other than very obliquely via the dementia tax. I had spent three months up to GE17 regularly visiting a number of hospitals and the travails were pretty fresh in my mind. May started so well on the doorstep of no 10. We saw none of that.

    If she had given a hint at how she was going to play Brexit beyond a policy that seemed to pander to the hard line of her party, with no hint as to the underlying game (Saboteur crushing or no). She needed help for Brexit? OK, but from whom and why I never knew.

    My door is still ajar to voting Tory ata some point in the battle against Corbyn, despite their being an utter shower, but it is going to take something a teency bit different.
    Well it's certainly true that during the campaign she did a great job of putting voters off, with much help from Fiona Hill and Nick Timothy.
  • TOPPINGTOPPING Posts: 13,198

    Quite a major-looking fire in Knightsbridge - the Mandarin Oriental Hotel apparently.

    It's just undergone a huge refurb.
  • SandyRentoolSandyRentool Posts: 6,201

    Quite a major-looking fire in Knightsbridge - the Mandarin Oriental Hotel apparently.

    Remoaner arsonists disrupting DD's speech...
  • williamglennwilliamglenn Posts: 18,892

    Quite a major-looking fire in Knightsbridge - the Mandarin Oriental Hotel apparently.

    Doesn't look good.
  • Morris_DancerMorris_Dancer Posts: 43,043
    Mr. JS, so a moped in London is like a crime licence under Gotham's Pax Penguina?
  • TheScreamingEaglesTheScreamingEagles Posts: 65,544

    Quite a major-looking fire in Knightsbridge - the Mandarin Oriental Hotel apparently.

    Doesn't look good.
    Fuck’s sake.

    When will people learn to shoot videos like this horizontally.


    You might as well not bother recording the video if you’re going to shoot it vertically.

    Very sad, stayed there a few times, enjoyed my time there.
  • AndyJSAndyJS Posts: 22,081

    Mr. JS, so a moped in London is like a crime licence under Gotham's Pax Penguina?

    I don't know but something odd is going on if the police are afraid of arresting moped drivers.
  • PulpstarPulpstar Posts: 44,186

    I note Sajid Javid is 10/1 Next Con Leader with Betfair Sportsbook (and also Betfred). This won't last. Especially now I've told you lot.

    I also note he's 14/1 Next PM with William Hill. Ditto.

    Ahead of him in Hills market are

    Corbyn @ 7-2 : Possibly but 7-2 is far far too short.
    Mogg @ 9-2 : LOL - Deep red on Betfair for me.
    Gove @11-2 : Possible, but too short
    Johnson @ 12-1 : Looks long enough, but a value trap
    Leadsom @ 14-1 : Hahaha
    Hunt @ 16-1 : A fair price but not in one of the big 4 offices..
    Williamson 20-1 : Who is backing him ?!?!?!
    Davidson 25-1 : Wishful thinking.
    Hammond 33-1 : OK (But 33-1 seems fair)
    Cleverly 40-1 : Well liked by Tories but not experienced enough to go for the top job
    Thornberry 40-1 : Any Labour person other than Corbyn should probably be automatically over 100-1 here as the Labour leadership is open post Corbyn.
    Rudd 40-1 : Joined the no hoper list as soon as she lost the Home Sec job tbh.
    Davis 40-1 : If Brexit goes well (No laughing at the back), May gets the glory. If Brexit goes badly, Davis carries the can..
    Tugendhat 50-1 : Into the realm of AN Other Tory here, there's alot of them and if you give the big jobs a certain % of the market; Labour another smaller slice then 50-1 is actually looking quite a large slice of the rags pie you have left
    Patel 50-1 : Again - Into the realm of AN Other Tory here, there's alot of them and if you give the big jobs a certain % of the market; Labour another smaller slice then 50-1 is actually looking quite a large slice of the rags pie you have left
    Sadiq Khan 80-1 : Huge amount of unlikely scenarios here
    Tom Watson 80-1 : 1000-1 more like.
    McDonnell 80-1: He might do it, personally I'm asking for another 0 onto the price on Betfair.
    Farage 250-1 : A lay at any price, red on Betfair for me.


  • SandpitSandpit Posts: 18,075
    AndyJS said:

    Mr. JS, so a moped in London is like a crime licence under Gotham's Pax Penguina?

    I don't know but something odd is going on if the police are afraid of arresting moped drivers.
    They’re afraid of the consequences of what happens when they get killled in the crash.
    https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-london-35635536
  • SlackbladderSlackbladder Posts: 6,020

    Quite a major-looking fire in Knightsbridge - the Mandarin Oriental Hotel apparently.

    I've had lunch there at Hestons. it's very nice... maybe not so much right now.
  • SlackbladderSlackbladder Posts: 6,020
    Sandpit said:

    AndyJS said:

    Mr. JS, so a moped in London is like a crime licence under Gotham's Pax Penguina?

    I don't know but something odd is going on if the police are afraid of arresting moped drivers.
    They’re afraid of the consequences of what happens when they get killled in the crash.
    https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-london-35635536
    Which the scrotes know, so thats why they do it.
  • Richard_NabaviRichard_Nabavi Posts: 18,285
    Pulpstar said:

    I note Sajid Javid is 10/1 Next Con Leader with Betfair Sportsbook (and also Betfred). This won't last. Especially now I've told you lot.

    I also note he's 14/1 Next PM with William Hill. Ditto.

    Ahead of him in Hills market are

    Corbyn @ 7-2 : Possibly but 7-2 is far far too short.
    Mogg @ 9-2 : LOL - Deep red on Betfair for me.
    Gove @11-2 : Possible, but too short
    Johnson @ 12-1 : Looks long enough, but a value trap
    Leadsom @ 14-1 : Hahaha
    Hunt @ 16-1 : A fair price but not in one of the big 4 offices..
    Williamson 20-1 : Who is backing him ?!?!?!
    Davidson 25-1 : Wishful thinking.
    Hammond 33-1 : OK (But 33-1 seems fair)
    Cleverly 40-1 : Well liked by Tories but not experienced enough to go for the top job
    Thornberry 40-1 : Any Labour person other than Corbyn should probably be automatically over 100-1 here as the Labour leadership is open post Corbyn.
    Rudd 40-1 : Joined the no hoper list as soon as she lost the Home Sec job tbh.
    Davis 40-1 : If Brexit goes well (No laughing at the back), May gets the glory. If Brexit goes badly, Davis carries the can..
    Tugendhat 50-1 : Into the realm of AN Other Tory here, there's alot of them and if you give the big jobs a certain % of the market; Labour another smaller slice then 50-1 is actually looking quite a large slice of the rags pie you have left
    Patel 50-1 : Again - Into the realm of AN Other Tory here, there's alot of them and if you give the big jobs a certain % of the market; Labour another smaller slice then 50-1 is actually looking quite a large slice of the rags pie you have left
    Sadiq Khan 80-1 : Huge amount of unlikely scenarios here
    Tom Watson 80-1 : 1000-1 more like.
    McDonnell 80-1: He might do it, personally I'm asking for another 0 onto the price on Betfair.
    Farage 250-1 : A lay at any price, red on Betfair for me.


    Good summary
  • PClippPClipp Posts: 1,543

    PClipp said:

    surby said:

    surby said:

    It's ironic that many of those who most vociferously say that Theresa May should stand up to über-Brexiteer bullies in her party are precisely those who voted to deny her the parliamentary numbers to do so.

    So the people are at fault ?
    Yes, of course, they gave her a near-impossible task and then they made it even more impossible. Votes have consequences, you know.
    If given the opportunity, the people could change their collective mind - now that they know what the original "wish" actually means.
    Unfortunately the option of going back to Cameron and Osborne, and remaining in the EU under the excellent terms negotiated, is no longer available. Hell, even the option of going back to Ed Miliband has vanished. We are where we are.
    What are these "excellent terms negotiated", Mr Navabi? I think we should be told.
    We were.
    There now! It quite passed me by..... Did the Conservative leadership fight for Remain on those terms? I feel sure I would have noticed i they had.......
  • BenpointerBenpointer Posts: 3,407
    Scott_P said:
    That's very good :lol:

    (Would be even better if it avoided the American euphemism for 'toilet')
  • felixfelix Posts: 7,567
    If we believed the chatteratis of the last couple of hours DD would have quit and the Government fallen by now. Colour me unimpressed!
  • GIN1138GIN1138 Posts: 11,129
    The government being split over Brexit is news.... ?
  • SandpitSandpit Posts: 18,075
    Hotel fire on Knightsbridge looks somewhat serious.
    image
  • TOPPINGTOPPING Posts: 13,198
    This has so much resonance of the Blair/Brown years. Outwardly what on earth does Joe Public know, seeming all calm and harmonious while the protagonists themselves are going at it like cats in a sack.

    Quite the opposite of what is good for the country.
  • DecrepitJohnLDecrepitJohnL Posts: 8,202

    Pro_Rata said:

    It's ironic that many of those who most vociferously say that Theresa May should stand up to über-Brexiteer bullies in her party are precisely those who voted to deny her the parliamentary numbers to do so.

    My door, for one, was ajar to the idea of voting Tory.

    If she had given a hint of understanding the public services challenge, other than very obliquely via the dementia tax. I had spent three months up to GE17 regularly visiting a number of hospitals and the travails were pretty fresh in my mind. May started so well on the doorstep of no 10. We saw none of that.

    If she had given a hint at how she was going to play Brexit beyond a policy that seemed to pander to the hard line of her party, with no hint as to the underlying game (Saboteur crushing or no). She needed help for Brexit? OK, but from whom and why I never knew.

    My door is still ajar to voting Tory ata some point in the battle against Corbyn, despite their being an utter shower, but it is going to take something a teency bit different.
    Well it's certainly true that during the campaign she did a great job of putting voters off, with much help from Fiona Hill and Nick Timothy.
    The problem was Lynton Crosby who sidelined the rest of the Cabinet, and had Theresa May respond to any question by parroting "strong and stable" which was immediately undermined by the dementia tax U-turn (stable) and running away from debates (strong).
  • Peter_the_PunterPeter_the_Punter Posts: 4,322

    surby said:

    It's ironic that many of those who most vociferously say that Theresa May should stand up to über-Brexiteer bullies in her party are precisely those who voted to deny her the parliamentary numbers to do so.

    So the people are at fault ?
    Yes, of course, they gave her a near-impossible task and then they made it even more impossible. Votes have consequences, you know.
    In a sense Richard, they gave her a very easy task. The referendum result imposed no condition other than to leave the EU. So any kind of Brexit, from WTO terms to BRINO, ticks the box.

    The problem as we both know is that wherever on that spectrum we finish up, the voters will be dissatisfied. Now it would be perfectly fair to point out that the voters gave a stupid answer to the question put. And then of course it would be fair to say that it was a stupid question to which a stupid answer was given.

    But true as this may be, it really doesn't help Theresa May, or any of us who wish a fiasco to be avoided. So what to do?

    Personally apart from leaving the country there isn't much one can do. As for the Government, I suppose it could grow a pair and tell the voters the true consequences of the decision to which they were bound.

    No, I don't think that's likely either, so what then?

    Buggered if I know, Richard, but I wouldn't rule out the scenario you and I have contemplated here before - Brexit followed by Corbyn and a spin down the road towards Venezuela.

    Toodle pip.
  • DecrepitJohnLDecrepitJohnL Posts: 8,202
    TOPPING said:

    This has so much resonance of the Blair/Brown years. Outwardly what on earth does Joe Public know, seeming all calm and harmonious while the protagonists themselves are going at it like cats in a sack.

    Quite the opposite of what is good for the country.
    Not really. These are fundamental policy differences inside the Cabinet, and is more reminiscent of Mrs Thatcher's cabinets. Blair and Brown just disagreed on when Blair should retire.
  • PClippPClipp Posts: 1,543
    felix said:

    If we believed the chatteratis of the last couple of hours DD would have quit and the Government fallen by now. Colour me unimpressed!
    Well, he would have done, if he had been half a man. Everybody is unimpressed by DD.
  • RobDRobD Posts: 32,510
    Scott_P said:
    Simple, offer a free method of proving citizenship/right of abode, and have that have the same status as passports in the check.
  • Philip_ThompsonPhilip_Thompson Posts: 13,300
    RobD said:

    Scott_P said:
    Simple, offer a free method of proving citizenship/right of abode, and have that have the same status as passports in the check.
    Checking right to work in the UK has been a legal requirement for employers for well over a decade now. I fail to see any difference between that and this.
  • RobDRobD Posts: 32,510
    TOPPING said:

    Quite a major-looking fire in Knightsbridge - the Mandarin Oriental Hotel apparently.

    It's just undergone a huge refurb.
    That's one way to describe a fire... :p
  • anothernickanothernick Posts: 1,241

    surby said:

    It's ironic that many of those who most vociferously say that Theresa May should stand up to über-Brexiteer bullies in her party are precisely those who voted to deny her the parliamentary numbers to do so.

    So the people are at fault ?
    Yes, of course, they gave her a near-impossible task and then they made it even more impossible. Votes have consequences, you know.
    In a sense Richard, they gave her a very easy task. The referendum result imposed no condition other than to leave the EU. So any kind of Brexit, from WTO terms to BRINO, ticks the box.

    The problem as we both know is that wherever on that spectrum we finish up, the voters will be dissatisfied. Now it would be perfectly fair to point out that the voters gave a stupid answer to the question put. And then of course it would be fair to say that it was a stupid question to which a stupid answer was given.

    But true as this may be, it really doesn't help Theresa May, or any of us who wish a fiasco to be avoided. So what to do?

    Personally apart from leaving the country there isn't much one can do. As for the Government, I suppose it could grow a pair and tell the voters the true consequences of the decision to which they were bound.

    No, I don't think that's likely either, so what then?

    Buggered if I know, Richard, but I wouldn't rule out the scenario you and I have contemplated here before - Brexit followed by Corbyn and a spin down the road towards Venezuela.

    Toodle pip.
    Until recently I assumed that since neither side wanted a cliff edge departure such an eventuality would be avoided. But there is now only about 4 months to go before a draft withdrawal treaty needs to be ready for ratification if the 29 March deadline is to be met. And we are nowhere near agreement on the text of such a treaty and no progress toward agreement is currently being made.

    It is not clear that the UK government is capable of agreeing with itself let alone the EU. And if it did manage to agree with itself there is no guarantee that it could take parliament with it.

    And the EU is preparing for a no deal - France and Holland are hiring the additional customs officers that would be needed for example. The UK, on the other hand, is playing the part of the rabbit in the headlights.

    Time to fasten our seatbelts....
  • TheScreamingEaglesTheScreamingEagles Posts: 65,544
    RobD said:

    TOPPING said:

    Quite a major-looking fire in Knightsbridge - the Mandarin Oriental Hotel apparently.

    It's just undergone a huge refurb.
    That's one way to describe a fire... :p
    It reminds me of the time I threw a house warming party for the chavs who moved onto our street.

    Well I say house warming, the police called it arson.
  • felixfelix Posts: 7,567
    PClipp said:

    felix said:

    If we believed the chatteratis of the last couple of hours DD would have quit and the Government fallen by now. Colour me unimpressed!
    Well, he would have done, if he had been half a man. Everybody is unimpressed by DD.
    That would be the LD version of 'everyone' - ie less than a cabful!
  • HYUFDHYUFD Posts: 41,348

    surby said:

    It's ironic that many of those who most vociferously say that Theresa May should stand up to über-Brexiteer bullies in her party are precisely those who voted to deny her the parliamentary numbers to do so.

    So the people are at fault ?
    Yes, of course, they gave her a near-impossible task and then they made it even more impossible. Votes have consequences, you know.
    In a sense Richard, they gave her a very easy task. The referendum result imposed no condition other than to leave the EU. So any kind of Brexit, from WTO terms to BRINO, ticks the box.

    The problem as we both know is that wherever on that spectrum we finish up, the voters will be dissatisfied. Now it would be perfectly fair to point out that the voters gave a stupid answer to the question put. And then of course it would be fair to say that it was a stupid question to which a stupid answer was given.

    But true as this may be, it really doesn't help Theresa May, or any of us who wish a fiasco to be avoided. So what to do?

    Personally apart from leaving the country there isn't much one can do. As for the Government, I suppose it could grow a pair and tell the voters the true consequences of the decision to which they were bound.

    No, I don't think that's likely either, so what then?

    Buggered if I know, Richard, but I wouldn't rule out the scenario you and I have contemplated here before - Brexit followed by Corbyn and a spin down the road towards Venezuela.

    Toodle pip.
    Until recently I assumed that since neither side wanted a cliff edge departure such an eventuality would be avoided. But there is now only about 4 months to go before a draft withdrawal treaty needs to be ready for ratification if the 29 March deadline is to be met. And we are nowhere near agreement on the text of such a treaty and no progress toward agreement is currently being made.

    It is not clear that the UK government is capable of agreeing with itself let alone the EU. And if it did manage to agree with itself there is no guarantee that it could take parliament with it.

    And the EU is preparing for a no deal - France and Holland are hiring the additional customs officers that would be needed for example. The UK, on the other hand, is playing the part of the rabbit in the headlights.

    Time to fasten our seatbelts....
    The deal at least in terms of through the transition period was already agreed in December ie the size of the exit bill, EU citizens rights and enough regulatory alignment by the UK to avoid a hard border in Ireland.

    A FTA may not be agreed by next March but that was never likely when Canada took 7 years to agree its EU FTA
  • Casino_RoyaleCasino_Royale Posts: 24,222

    Pro_Rata said:

    It's ironic that many of those who most vociferously say that Theresa May should stand up to über-Brexiteer bullies in her party are precisely those who voted to deny her the parliamentary numbers to do so.

    My door, for one, was ajar to the idea of voting Tory.

    If she had given a hint of understanding the public services challenge, other than very obliquely via the dementia tax. I had spent three months up to GE17 regularly visiting a number of hospitals and the travails were pretty fresh in my mind. May started so well on the doorstep of no 10. We saw none of that.

    If she had given a hint at how she was going to play Brexit beyond a policy that seemed to pander to the hard line of her party, with no hint as to the underlying game (Saboteur crushing or no). She needed help for Brexit? OK, but from whom and why I never knew.

    My door is still ajar to voting Tory ata some point in the battle against Corbyn, despite their being an utter shower, but it is going to take something a teency bit different.
    Well it's certainly true that during the campaign she did a great job of putting voters off, with much help from Fiona Hill and Nick Timothy.
    Theresa May and Nick Timothy are to blame for the result of the GE2017, in my opinion.

    She for not turning up or living up to her pitch and providing piss poor leadership, and Timothy for his arrogance, complacency and piss poor manifesto.

    Both for their secretive do-as-you’re-told style of Government. We didn’t have to be where we are now.
  • Philip_ThompsonPhilip_Thompson Posts: 13,300

    surby said:

    It's ironic that many of those who most vociferously say that Theresa May should stand up to über-Brexiteer bullies in her party are precisely those who voted to deny her the parliamentary numbers to do so.

    So the people are at fault ?
    Yes, of course, they gave her a near-impossible task and then they made it even more impossible. Votes have consequences, you know.
    In a sense Richard, they gave her a very easy task. The referendum result imposed no condition other than to leave the EU. So any kind of Brexit, from WTO terms to BRINO, ticks the box.

    The problem as we both know is that wherever on that spectrum we finish up, the voters will be dissatisfied. Now it would be perfectly fair to point out that the voters gave a stupid answer to the question put. And then of course it would be fair to say that it was a stupid question to which a stupid answer was given.

    But true as this may be, it really doesn't help Theresa May, or any of us who wish a fiasco to be avoided. So what to do?

    Personally apart from leaving the country there isn't much one can do. As for the Government, I suppose it could grow a pair and tell the voters the true consequences of the decision to which they were bound.

    No, I don't think that's likely either, so what then?

    Buggered if I know, Richard, but I wouldn't rule out the scenario you and I have contemplated here before - Brexit followed by Corbyn and a spin down the road towards Venezuela.

    Toodle pip.
    Until recently I assumed that since neither side wanted a cliff edge departure such an eventuality would be avoided. But there is now only about 4 months to go before a draft withdrawal treaty needs to be ready for ratification if the 29 March deadline is to be met. And we are nowhere near agreement on the text of such a treaty and no progress toward agreement is currently being made.

    It is not clear that the UK government is capable of agreeing with itself let alone the EU. And if it did manage to agree with itself there is no guarantee that it could take parliament with it.

    And the EU is preparing for a no deal - France and Holland are hiring the additional customs officers that would be needed for example. The UK, on the other hand, is playing the part of the rabbit in the headlights.

    Time to fasten our seatbelts....
    People were saying the same about 10 months ago about the Phase 1 negotiations. Then suddenly everything was ready to be signed minus some last minute posturing.

    I'm fairly relaxed the same is happening now.
This discussion has been closed.